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Bella has 2 white grains in her poop this morning. I treated her about a month ago for tapeworms giving her 3 doses of virbantel over the course of about 6-8 weeks and they went away until today She is on revolution for flea prevention. How can she keep getting tapeworms, every other dog I have ever had has never gotten tapeworms
 

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Does she or any of the other dogs in the house have fleas?
 

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She is on revolution for flea's and I have never seen a flea on her, she scratches but I never see flea's on her and our other dog is on comfortis for fleas. Ive had other dogs never on any form of flea prevention never get tapeworms but Bella who is on flea prevention keeps getting them
 

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She is on revolution for flea's and I have never seen a flea on her, she scratches but I never see flea's on her and our other dog is on comfortis for fleas. Ive had other dogs never on any form of flea prevention never get tapeworms but Bella who is on flea prevention keeps getting them
It is from ingesting fleas. She is coming into contact with them from somewhere. Maybe the revolution isn't working. Check around the tail area for fleas. the hide well in the fur. You could start giving her Health clay. You just sprinkle in on her meals.
Parasites
Calcium bentonite clay is a natural de-wormer. It gently removes parasites from the intestinal tract and safely eliminates them- all without the use of harmful chemicals or medications. In addition, the clay also cleanses the digestive tract of bad bacteria, viruses and fungi, which allows the animal to better absorb nutrients from its diet. This detoxifying action also aids the animal’s liver and kidney, which can easily become overloaded with toxins.
https://earthslivingclay.com/1702/heal-your-pet-naturally-with-calcium-bentonite-clay/
What and how to use
https://earthslivingclay.com/shop/clay-for-pets.html?sef_rewrite=1
 

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I have never heard of that, I will have to look into that. It's a-lot cheaper then buying dewormer all the time
 

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I have never heard of that, I will have to look into that. It's a-lot cheaper then buying dewormer all the time
Its also great to have around for teeth cleaning. You just rub it on the teeth and it kills bacteria where ever you put it. I have also used it for scrapes on myself and the dogs it heals and when hardens from a paste it creates its own bandage. It seems to work better than antibiotic cream on wounds plus you don't have to worry if they lick it off. It is a lot easier on the system than the wormers. They can be really harsh. Also good for settling a sick tummy for a pup that eats something they aren't supposed to. That is what makes kaopectate work. You used to be able to use for upset stomachs on dogs until they added something that was not good for them to it. Thats when I looked into using healing clay. The astronauts are using it for bone loss and scientific studies are proving it can kill things like staph infections. Amazing what mud can do. The only time you don't want to use it internally is if your pet is on medication. It sees the meds as a toxin and will remove them from the system. The clay has to be given 2 hours after the meds. Here is more info
http://www.allnaturalpetcare.com/Holistic_Pet_Remedies/Edible_Green_Calcium_Montmorillonite_Clay_Bulk_Powder-Pets.html
 

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Depending on where you are, there are some areas (I believe Southern USA) where the fleas are beginning to become resistant to certain flea treatments. Have you spoken to your vet about potentially trying something else?
 

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Dogs can also get some species of tapeworms from eating small prey animals.

Also if you're not seeing fleas and your dog doesn't hunt, then bring a sample to your veterinarian in case it's not actually tapeworms. It won't do you any good to keep treating them over and over if that's not what it is.
 

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Dogs can also get some species of tapeworms from eating small prey animals.

Also if you're not seeing fleas and your dog doesn't hunt, then bring a sample to your veterinarian in case it's not actually tapeworms. It won't do you any good to keep treating them over and over if that's not what it is.
This is the case with our guys. They hunt rats and rabbits at the farm, and they'll get tapeworms from ingesting fleas from the prey items. It doesn't happen too frequently, but when it does I call up the vet and pick up some wormer. I have NEVER seen a flea on any of my animals, and all of them are on prevention.

Awhile back I was bringing my puppy in for shots and mentioned to the vet tech that I needed to get some wormer for my other dog for tapeworms. The tech (who I'm not overly fond of at all, and who I've had issues with in the past) was a real pain in the butt about it and said that I "have GOT to get this flea problem under control." Uhh, what flea problem? My dogs go out in the world and do what they were bred do, and sometimes come down with parasites in the process ;) Needless to say, we had words and the vet did end up giving us the wormer...

I did have my exclusively indoor cat get tapeworms once. My guess is that a stray flea came in on one of the dogs, and managed to get on the cat before the preventatives killed it. So, even if your dog doesn't have fleas it could come in contact with one and ingest it before the preventatives take effect. He could also get it from playing with another dog or other animal with fleas, stuff like that.

And, like others have said, not all preventatives are 100% effective in all areas. People around here don't use frontline anymore for that reason. Even with the preventatives I'd be going over your dog very thoroughly with a flea comb to make sure he doesn't currently have any. If he does, getting rid of them and getting on a more effective flea control program would be the first course of actions. Tapeworms are transmitted to dogs through fleas, so somehow he's had occasion to ingest them. Either he has the fleas on him, or picks up and ingests stray fleas from other animals.
 
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