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So we have a 14 week year old puppy, but we've been having some problems with training, particularly the come, drop it, and follow commands. I know for a fact that he knows them, as if I bring a higher value treat, like cooked chicken, he suddenly is does it perfectly. When I tell him to drop the bark, he bolts, and we begin an awful game of cat and mouse, usually with me losing. He does this with other commands as well, but this one is the most irritating. It is a very frequent occurance, and I've started taking him outside on a leash so he can't run away. Any ideas on how I could get him to listen? I give him a treat after every trick, but I guess chewing on bark is more fun.

I guess what I'm looking for is some sort of punishment method, as awful as that sounds. He also bites us, and turning your back and ignoring him is difficult when he is locked onto your arm.
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For biting, I've found just freezing will usually work to get the pup to let go as you are now "boring" to bite and then replace with an appropriate toy.

For the training, punishment in training is a no go, especially since the puppy is so young. Remember he's 14 weeks. He's still a *baby*. Perhaps you could sign up for a positive reinforcement training class.
 

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He is a baby with a very short attention span, like about 5 seconds. How to teach a terrific recall make your hands his breakfast and dinner bowl. As he is enjoying his meal take a step backwards and say the word come. If he follows (which he should) take two steps backwards. Once he knows that your hands mean food bend down with your hands cupped saying come. Sometimes there is food sometimes there is not. But more often because he is young there should be a reward. Slowly raise your hands from the low height to a higher one. If he continues to come eventually you will not have to cup your hands just say come. He needs to know that good things happen when he comes. This should be done inside where he is safe. The next step is to train outside with distraction on a long line. One more thing when he has bark in his mouth don't chase him you run the opposite direction with a toy. You make yourself more interesting than the bark.
 

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I can think of a lot of things to say but if I had to say just one thing, it would be based on your pup's age. Discipline has its place but taking advantage of the pup's malleability is a precious moment of sorts. I would encourage the shaping of your pup in a positive fashion rather than burden or the risk of a negative consequence hindering the bond which you are currently forming with your pup which will last a lifetime.

I know it's not much of an answer in a specific way rather more of the big picture.
 
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