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I know he's not attacking me, but it sure does feel like it.
I've been working on Theo's (3 month old cattle dog mix) biting and it just doesn't seem to be getting better. It seems to be getting worse actually (he's drawn blood multiple times).

These are the typical situations when he bites:
-practicing the come command, he'll be running towards me and sometimes instead of sitting he's just go straight for my ankles
-on walks, he'll have random fits and just attack
-fetch, similar to come, when he's running towards me with the toy he's just drop it and go for my ankles

When I'm near an area where I can get away from him, I do. I close the door on him, put him in his pen, etc or if I'm outside I'll be desperate enough to climb a tree to escape his jaws. This works well, he learns that he shouldn't be biting and (for that session) it stops after a few repetitions.

But on walks or when we are training in big open field where I have no escape, I know I shouldn't do this but I have no choice but to restrain him. I'll hold his snout shut, pin him down on the ground, etc. Clearly, that strategy has no been working but I just don't know what to do because sometimes he just "attacks" at he most randomest times when I can't take cover or leave him alone.

I've tried stopping and staying still but then he just bites down harder and the pain is too much. And when using a toy to distract, he just completely ignored it.

I don't believe his biting is out of aggression. He's never growled at me (he has barked though) and this always happens on walks/play sessions or when my legs are moving around him. Apart from this, he's very sweet, he knows to mouth my hand gently when I handle him but when I just can't handle these fits.

I am planning on going to puppy/obedience classes but I can't until August (have to save up some money).

Is there anything I could do to help teach bite inhibition? Should I just not be going on walks and only play in areas where I can escape his biting? Should I try to get him to have more play times with other dogs/puppies?
 

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First of all, you have a herding dog: these dogs are bred to keep animals together. For example, my brother has a working border collie. When my four dogs are playing in the yard, he will circle them to keep them together. Sometimes he bites one of them if they are too far away from the pack. It's his instinct; he is bred to do this.

Besides his instinct (so during games): if your puppy bites you, just make a high pitched pain noise (like a puppy would do). When puppies are still with their mother, the mother corrects them. So if they bite, and it's too hard, the mother will correct the pup. Since you are the new puppy parent, it's your job to correct him. If you make this noise, your puppy will know he bit a little bit too hard.

This might sound weird, but this really works!

A kong stuffed toy is also a great idea. Your dog will teach himself that if he plays with his toy, he gets a treat. If he bites on other things, he gets nothing.

Hope this helps!
Good luck!
 

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I don't have a working dog, but I do have a 9month old puppy who was like this up until a month ago. He would bite our hands all the time and it hurt so much we tried yelping we tried showing him his toys, giving him a kong, which would work while it ate what was in it then he's come back and start again. If we said 'no' he do it even harder.

Thing it puppy play like this with each other they nip all the time so to him your his pack and he's playing with you. But I understand it's too much.

Hope hos helps.
 

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You have a dog that is bred to use his mouth, it's going to be harder than some other breeds.
Also, keep all activities as calm as possible. If you get excited, or move quick, it will get him excited too!

When playing fetch, throw a second toy before he even reaches you. You may end up needing 3 or more toys, but prevention is one of the biggest parts of stopping the behavior. Give him a break and time to relax and try again.
When working on "come" try having a treat/toy ready to reward him for coming to you. Don't ask for a sit until he can first come to you without going for your ankles. You can add in the sit once he stops biting.
 

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My cocker mix is also very mouthy. I honestly always found that making any kind of noise to stop him really just egged him on.

What worked for us was just freezing. He bites, I stop moving entirely. All of a sudden, I am no fun anymore. Once he stopped biting, I would give him a rope to chew on instead. If you're going on walks, invest in a nice long rope that you can swing around for him to play with.
 
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