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I have a 5 month old Corgi puppy, that has not been neutered yet, who has been very nippy since we got him. When he was younger he would mouth and nip but would break the skin occasionally due to his teeth being so sharp. When we play with him on the ground he will mouth our arms and hands which can escalate into a more aggressive nipping. This will occasionally result in the puppy going behind us and "attacking" our backs. During these fits he does not become deterred with toys or treats and growls while lacking on to body parts. When this happens we have tried walking away, making a noise to connote rough play, and even time outs to have him calm down. This aggressive behavior does not seem to be getting better and we are getting concerned. He does not seem to like being pet and will mouth/nip at people who pet him when he is not in a mood for it. He is a well mannered dog who is in socialization classes and obedience classes but is this behavior normal herder puppy play or is this an aggressive dog who needs an intervention?
 

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The biting and nipping is completely normal for a puppy, he is probably just teething and playing. The puppy should have a full set of adult teeth at about 7 month. It has nothing to do with aggression. Keep on doing what you’re doing, just walk away and ignore him if he starts biting or divert him with toys or treats. You say that he won’t care about the toys or treats, try to make them more desirable. A toy in motion or a squeaky toy is often more interesting to the dog. You can also try to find more high value treats, which you can throw on the ground to direct him.

Herding dogs often has an higher tendency to nip and bite since this is part if their instinct.
 

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Perhaps a little bit of a combination. Mainly play, and I wonder if you trying several solutions has been why he hasn't clicked - it's usually best to pick one thing and stick to it, the consistency is important. It is just an extension of the boisterous play he had with is littermates but he needs to learn this is not how to play with humans. Some people find a sharp 'ouch' works but it can just ramp up the excitement. Some people find putting a toy in the dog's mouth works, others find the puppy is still more interested in nipping hands. My preferred method is to teach him that teeth on skin equals end of fun. So as soon as he makes contact, walk out of the room for a few moments. As long as the whole family is consistent - do it immediately and do it every time - he will learn. You could use a house line to draw him away, which keeps your hands both out of reach and also keeps hands for only good things.

You may also be seeing something called extinction burst. This is when a behaviour that used to get attention no longer works for the dog so he tries it all the harder and it seems like things are getting worse, not better. This is good, because it means that what you are doing is starting to work!

But if he doesn't like being petted, pay attention to him. Some dogs just don't. You can try the five second rule - you pet him for five seconds, then stop. If he initiates further contact, for example by nudging you, do another five seconds then stop. Continue to pet him only for as long as he asks. This gives him control over how much he is touched, which in turn gives him confidence because he learns he can stop it if he feels uncomfortable.

It's also worth knowing about canine body language because a growl before a nip is an important communication, and one that we should respect. Your dog is saying ”I'm uncomfortable, please make this stop or take me away from it”. Dogs give a series of signals that they are unhappy, but unfortunately most people don't recognise them because they can be quite subtle. To begin with there is often wide eyes, lip licking and yawning. There is also muscular tension in the body. Then the ones we sometimes do see - growl, snarl, nip then bite. If the early signals are not seen (or, in the dog's view, ignored) he won't bother with them because us stupid humans pay no attention anyway; so he may go straight to the bite. So it's important never to ignore the early signals. As a friend says, she would rather be told verbally to sod off than be smacked in the face with no apparent warning.
 

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I have a 5 month old Corgi puppy, that has not been neutered yet, who has been very nippy since we got him. When he was younger he would mouth and nip but would break the skin occasionally due to his teeth being so sharp. When we play with him on the ground he will mouth our arms and hands which can escalate into a more aggressive nipping. This will occasionally result in the puppy going behind us and "attacking" our backs. During these fits he does not become deterred with toys or treats and growls while lacking on to body parts. When this happens we have tried walking away, making a noise to connote rough play, and even time outs to have him calm down. This aggressive behavior does not seem to be getting better and we are getting concerned. He does not seem to like being pet and will mouth/nip at people who pet him when he is not in a mood for it. He is a well mannered dog who is in socialization classes and obedience classes but is this behavior normal herder puppy play or is this an aggressive dog who needs an intervention?
 

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Also having the same issues with my puppy and I am training it. I think you need to train your puppy in order to control its aggression. Training definitely helps is solving behavior issues.
Do you experience that your puppy is aggressive? If so, why?
 
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