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Discussion Starter #1
Like most dog owners after purchasing dog food, I would pick up a bag of dog snacks. I always bought Pup-peroni lean beef flavor at $10.00 to $11.99 for 25 ounce bag. Although this snack can be had cheaper on the Web with free shipping and at Walmart for the same price.
But the reason for this thread is to point out the differences in Price, Quality and the Weight you get for your money.

Pup-Peroni lean beef flavor 25 ounces = $10.00 to 11.99 and this snack has meat by- products as part of the ingredients.
Vs
Hormel Black Label Ham 48 ounces at Walmart = $9.66 and there is no meat by-products in it. And you are getting almost TWICE the weight for your money.
Needless to say, I now share this ham with my dog. I just cut a couple pieces at 3/8 thick and dice it up and I give him 40 grams. That's a little more then the weight of two Pup-Peroni sticks. The rest goes into a zip-lock bag and placed back into the fridge.
 

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I give my dog super cheap crappy dog treats(Ol' Roy). I use them pretty rarely and my mom bought me two huge things of them for Christmas so that's what I have, were it up to me I'd use something high quality, but it's fine, like I said I rarely use them. Much more often my dog gets pieces of deli meat or mozzarella I'm eating in exchange for commands.
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Makes me wonder why dog snack food cost more to produce then People Food.
I feed "Taste Of The Wild" brand dog food and what I pay per can is a little more then what I pay for "Campbells Chunky Soup or "Progresso" traditional can soups.
 

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That is why feeding real meat is cheeper and healthier. I would skip the ham though because it is full of nitrates and to much salt for a dog. But then I would not feed pup -peroni either
Beef, Meat By-products, Soy Grits, Sugar, Wheat Flour, Liver, Bacon, Dried Eggs, Salt, Propylene Glycol, Corn Gluten Meal, Garlic Powder, Natural Smoke Flavor, Potassium Sorbate (Used as a Preservative), Yellow 5, Caramel Color, Applewood Smoke Flavor, Red 40, BHA (Used as a Preservative), Sodium Nitrite (for Color Retention), Onion Extract.
You have byproducts that are junk soy sugar wheat that can cause allergies and hyperactivity dyes that can cause seizures and BHA that causes cancer That is not a treat. I like to get the turkey strips, cook them put them into snack size bags and freeze what you can't use in three days. They thaw quickly in small quantity. Healthy and cheep.
 

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I consider pup-peroni to be something like hot dogs and/or sugar cereal... every so often isn't too bad, but more then twice a week is dangerous to one's health. My girls LOVE it when I trim off bits of raw meat from what I'm about to make for dinner. They love it more than the 'treats' from the store. :)
 

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I use little training treats, the brand that I use varies based on what I find on sale. I just read the ingredient list and make sure that it looks half way decent.

I'll also cook real meat for him, and am going to make tuna brownies as soon as I end my lazy streak and get back to baking.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks,
I'll look for it next shopping trip. When I figured out that a can of quality dog food cost the same or more then people food, then why not prepare his food with fresh ingredients and make a 31 day supply and freeze the other 30. As you stated, fresh meat is cheaper.
I worked out a recipe for chicken & veggies for my 35 lb. beagle. He is a bit over weight.
6 ounces of chicken breast & 6 ounces of peas, carrots & potato's per day.
Each portion will be placed in zip lock bags and frozen.
He will be fed 1/2 portion twice a day with a snack in between. The chicken breast at $1.99 per pound comes out to $0.124 per ounce and a 31 day supply of chicken cost $23.06. Adding veggies should bring the total to less then $30.00 per month. That beats the $74.40 I pay for can food.
I will also check out stewing beef along with turkey to give him variety.
 

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Thanks,
I'll look for it next shopping trip. When I figured out that a can of quality dog food cost the same or more then people food, then why not prepare his food with fresh ingredients and make a 31 day supply and freeze the other 30. As you stated, fresh meat is cheaper.
I worked out a recipe for chicken & veggies for my 35 lb. beagle. He is a bit over weight.
6 ounces of chicken breast & 6 ounces of peas, carrots & potato's per day.
Each portion will be placed in zip lock bags and frozen.
He will be fed 1/2 portion twice a day with a snack in between. The chicken breast at $1.99 per pound comes out to $0.124 per ounce and a 31 day supply of chicken cost $23.06. Adding veggies should bring the total to less then $30.00 per month. That beats the $74.40 I pay for can food.
I will also check out stewing beef along with turkey to give him variety.

It's not that easy to prepare homecooked food for a dog, you need to make sure that, over the course of a couple of weeks, it's a balanced diet. In other words you don't have to provide a balanced diet every meal, but over the course of time it must be balanced. To do that you need to provide a variety of proteins, beef, poultry, fish etc, the reason for that is not for variety but because each meat provides different vitamins and minerals. You need to provide organ meat, liver, kidneys, green tripe (not the bleached stuff they sell in most groceries). If not feeding RAW bones you need a source of calcium. Even with all that you'd do best to also add a good vitamin dog supplement just to make sure anything you missed will be covered. It's actually easier to feed a dog a balanced PMR diet then it is to feed a homecooked one.

Here's a link to look at if you are serious about cooking for him, it'll help you get it right but I still urge you to double check with a veterinarian nutritionist just to be certain that your recipe is a good one. DogAware.com Articles: Homemade Cooked Diets for Dogs
 

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Thanks Rain & Dawnben
Gosh! I did not know what I was getting into when I suggested I would see about making up my own food. Its easier for me to spend the money then worry about vitamins, calcium, etc. I am feeding a quality dog food and your suggestions are good one's but its a lot of work just for one pet. Now someone with a couple of dogs may be able to use this info more then me. But thanks again for taking an interest.
 

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Thanks Rain & Dawnben
Gosh! I did not know what I was getting into when I suggested I would see about making up my own food. Its easier for me to spend the money then worry about vitamins, calcium, etc. I am feeding a quality dog food and your suggestions are good one's but its a lot of work just for one pet. Now someone with a couple of dogs may be able to use this info more then me. But thanks again for taking an interest.

You're welcome!



I cook stuff to put on top of my dogs food, so he gets more variety then plain kibble, you might look into trying that rather then cooking their regular food. Whatever you cook can also be used for treats and it does tend to be cheaper, tastier, and a lot more nutritious then store bought treats.
 
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