Dog Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,876 Posts
she is obviously protecting her territory, this is common it terriers. what I suggest it letting her bark but give her a command like STOP and if she doesn't, squirt her with a spray bottle. this way she will alert you until she knows you want her to stop and that you know of the possible threat.
Please check out our forum rules, in particular #13.:thumbsup:
http://www.dogforum.com/dogforum-community-rules/dogforum-com-rules-1606/

Spray bottles may seem effective for some dogs, but normally aren't for several reasons. Two biggest ones...

First, with corrections like this typically the dog really never learns the appropriate behavior. It only learns to be quiet when the bottle comes out so as to avoid the correction. Thus the reason so many people have to have bottles nearby and go get them when the dog acts up for much of the dog's life.

Second, if the dog does dislike being sprayed, it's likely the dog is making a negative association between the visitors and the spray bottle. Perhaps even on some level a negative association with the handler. Just not likely to actually help this dog feel any better about the strangers (stopping at a distance and the cautious approach suggest discomfort).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,876 Posts
@Bantams, your girl stopping and barking at a distance and then approaching hesitantly for a treat, to me points to discomfort/nervousness/fear moreso than protectiveness.

Personally if expecting visitors I would come up with a way to keep her with me or prevent her from being able to practice this barking at arrival in the first place. Perhaps inside, on lead, in a fenced area, etc. Once calm then I would allow greeting if she was comfy.

Something else to consider is that sometimes luring in a hesitant dog backfires down the road. The possibility of food draws them in close, however they aren't actually comfy with the proximity or interaction. So they'll approach strangers who squat or hold out their hand but without the food or when food ends may have an ''uh-oh! You're scary!" moment and react.

You'll likely have better long term success if you work on proximity first then later once comfy, work on the interaction.

But if you feel you must work on interaction, teach a couple cute tricks. Guests can ask for those behaviors and toss treats. No food directly from strangers' hands for now. Tossing the treats away behind your dog will likely be super helpful. Gives a brief relief or break from the social pressure and ups the value of the reward. It'll make greetings predictable, give her the freedom to choose how close to get to the guest, and give a safe hands-free way to begin interactions with strangers. :)
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top