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Discussion Starter #1
I have 2 pits and one seems to be having problems. I have been noticing that she kind of gallops, or limps favoring one side. We have checked her legs and feet and she is fine. This seems to be getting worse and she tripped coming up the stairs the other day. She has lots of energy when playing with her sister, but after a good run around she is the slowest to come in as she does her "limping" thing.

The other thing I have noticed is she has tremors when she is at rest (she is not cold).

Any ideas what this is or if it is anything?

Thanks.
 

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Sounds neurologic.

Has she been lyme tested recently? Lameness and tiredness, and shaking can all be symptoms. I've notice this year was horrid for ticks, and lots of those little teeny ones too, that you don't always find, and they are the devils that carry lyme.

Have you had her thyroid level checked? Some symptoms of hypothyroidism can include exercise fatigue and lameness as well... also weight gain and cold intollerance.

Overall, I'd definitely take her to the vet and describe her symptoms. A few simple tests and blood work could rule in/out several possibilities.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Tess

We did have the yard (Green) treated for fleas and ticks so hopefully not that. I didn't think of the thyroid. We get her checked out. Thank you :)

Sounds neurologic.

Has she been lyme tested recently? Lameness and tiredness, and shaking can all be symptoms. I've notice this year was horrid for ticks, and lots of those little teeny ones too, that you don't always find, and they are the devils that carry lyme.

Have you had her thyroid level checked? Some symptoms of hypothyroidism can include exercise fatigue and lameness as well... also weight gain and cold intollerance.

Overall, I'd definitely take her to the vet and describe her symptoms. A few simple tests and blood work could rule in/out several possibilities.
 

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That's good you've had the yard treated, but ticks are very sneaky. Your dog could easily have gotten bitten without you knowing it. What you need is a LYME test. Its called "4 DX snap test" and it checks for 4 different tick born diseases, including Lyme.
It takes just a couple drops of blood to do the test.
Your vet should be doing this at least once a year.
The tick diseases are very prevalent and insidious!

Please let us know what you learn. :)
 

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How old is the dog and what color? And my apologies but I am on my phone I cannot see your location, do you live in the southwest (I am just assuming you are in the US)
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Is she still eating well?
Has she been showing any signs of respiratory distress?
Any dischage from the eyes or runny nose?
Do the pads of her feet seem to be thickening?
Is she fully Vaccinated?
Do you know her family history? (health issues)
If not, I would talk to your Vet about distemper, wobblers syndrome, or other possible causes.
I hope you get to the bottom of it soon, please keep us posted :)
 

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Lyme disease is only spread by deer ticks so you'd have to be in an area with deer (at least that was the last set of facts I ever heard about it). My guy has had tremor episodes before and drags his feet sometimes when walking, it is a genetic thing. Now limping or favoring one side sounds to possibly be a different issue and so a vet visit to rule out both Tess and Mischiefs points I think are a good way to start
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Discussion Starter #9
reply to mischief

Had her since she was a puppy and all shots are up to date. No other visible signs, and oddly she is doing better today. I do not want to risk her health, however our financial situation is...I am making homemade dog food because I am on stamps :(. Although that's probably better :) Point being, I don't want to risk, but have to be careful where I spend money as I am out of work and would have to ask someone for the money.


Is she still eating well?
Has she been showing any signs of respiratory distress?
Any dischage from the eyes or runny nose?
Do the pads of her feet seem to be thickening?
Is she fully Vaccinated?
Do you know her family history? (health issues)
If not, I would talk to your Vet about distemper, wobblers syndrome, or other possible causes.
I hope you get to the bottom of it soon, please keep us posted :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
UPDATE (epilepsy?)

UPDATED SECTION:(not sure how to update this thread, hop I am doing this properly)

We were taking her to the vet this week but this morning (Sunday) I found her laying on the bathroom floor (in the second bathroom where she NEVER goes to "hang out" and she was shaking. I used to have a husky that would have seizures and hers were full blown but the weird thing is that she did the same thing...she would go into the bathroom where she would NEVER go and that's how I always knew she was ready to have one. It gave me time to get her out side and I could stay with her.

Back to Bella, she was on the floor shaking (more like tremors) and when I tried to get her up after a few minutes when the shaking subsided, she had a hard time getting up and limped to the couch.

If you think this is epilepsy, I know there is little we can do, but do I need to find an emergency vet TODAY or is our apt next week ok? I hate to admit this, but our finances are so bad and I know an emergency visit will be difficult for us...but do not want to risk damage to our baby.

Thanks for reading again.


I have 2 pits and one seems to be having problems. I have been noticing that she kind of gallops, or limps favoring one side. We have checked her legs and feet and she is fine. This seems to be getting worse and she tripped coming up the stairs the other day. She has lots of energy when playing with her sister, but after a good run around she is the slowest to come in as she does her "limping" thing.

The other thing I have noticed is she has tremors when she is at rest (she is not cold).

Any ideas what this is or if it is anything?

Thanks.
 

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I would still encourage you to get the 4DX test for all the tick diseases. There are several diseases and they are found all over the country, carried by many kinds of ticks. Symptoms of these diseases can vary a great deal. What you describe sounds like it comes from the central nervous system, and this correlates with some manifestations of tick diseases (as well as many other possibilities) I've seen wobbler's syndrome before and in my experience it is slowly progressive, not something that has episodes as you describe. What ever Pawz is talking about I've never heard about, but it sounds similar to your dog's problem, so maybe you can find out more about that.

I'm sure you would indeed spend a ton of money at an emergency vet, and still maybe not come up with answers very quickly. If she is having difficulty breathing, or color is wrong (pale or blue gums/tongue), actively vomiting or having terrible diarrhea, or in any other way seems to be in dire condition, I would take her to the emergency vet. If she is stable, eating, wagging her tail, peeing, pooping and otherwise acting normal (besides the trembling) it may be OK to just keep an eye on her and try to make it to your appointment.

What is her condition at this time?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thank you so much!

Right now she is back to normal...still limps around...but she has always been the "lazy" sister, so she is hanging out on the couch as usual. She did engage in some play but only if we played according to her rules...on the couch. It seems she is not up to bouncing around, but otherwise seems happy. No problems eating or color changes.

I will look into what Tess mentioned and make sure I ask for the tick test you mentioned.

I will let everyone know when we get the results from the vet. You have put me to ease...a bit, but of course still worried about her. Thank you SO much for everyone input.


I would still encourage you to get the 4DX test for all the tick diseases. There are several diseases and they are found all over the country, carried by many kinds of ticks. Symptoms of these diseases can vary a great deal. What you describe sounds like it comes from the central nervous system, and this correlates with some manifestations of tick diseases (as well as many other possibilities) I've seen wobbler's syndrome before and in my experience it is slowly progressive, not something that has episodes as you describe. What ever Pawz is talking about I've never heard about, but it sounds similar to your dog's problem, so maybe you can find out more about that.

I'm sure you would indeed spend a ton of money at an emergency vet, and still maybe not come up with answers very quickly. If she is having difficulty breathing, or color is wrong (pale or blue gums/tongue), actively vomiting or having terrible diarrhea, or in any other way seems to be in dire condition, I would take her to the emergency vet. If she is stable, eating, wagging her tail, peeing, pooping and otherwise acting normal (besides the trembling) it may be OK to just keep an eye on her and try to make it to your appointment.

What is her condition at this time?
 

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Um can you post a link where it says lyme disease is carried by many types of ticks?

The condition may have is called idiopathic epilepsy or something like that. I believe its beneficial to take a dog who had a seizure in within an hour or something of the seizure but I'm not sure
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i know that e-vets can be very expensive, but a vet visit, sooner, rather than later is best for the dog. if you knew, for certain what was causing the dog's problem, you might be better able to make a decision about waiting or not, but since you do not know, the symptoms you described absolutely sound like e-vet worthy symptoms. i'm not trying to frighten you, only to encourage you to do what is in the best interest of your dog... i'll be keeping her in my thoughts, and sending {{{healing vibes}}} your way... please, definitely keep us posted...



Dog | Forum | Rocks!
 

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Um can you post a link where it says lyme disease is carried by many types of ticks?
This is what I said...
" There are several diseases and they are found all over the country, carried by many kinds of ticks."

For example...
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Dog Tick Diseases—How to Protect Your Dog from Tick Illnesses
Canine Anaplasmosis [ an-uh-plaz-moh-sis ]

Sometimes referred to as dog fever, or dog tick fever, canine anaplasmosis is caused by the bacteria Anaplasma phagocytophilum or is transmitted by the deer tick (often referred to as the black-legged tick)—the same tick that transmits Lyme disease. Another form of Canine Anaplasmosis is caused by the Anaplasma platys bacterium carried by the brown dog tick. Although these two forms of Anaplasmosis present with different signs, both may pose a serious threat to your dog's health.
Most common signs of canine anaplasmosis:

  • Arthritis-like stiffness with painful joints
  • High fever accompanied by lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea
  • Neurological signs (infrequent) resulting in seizures and neck pain
U.S. Regions Where Canine Anaplasmosis May Affect Your Dog
Canine anaplasmosis is found throughout the United States, primarily in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic and north-central states, as well as in California.

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by the American dog tick, the wood tick and the lone star tick. In most cases, Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs lasts about two weeks, but in severe cases it can result in death.
Most common signs of Rocky Mountain spotted fever:

  • Fever
  • Skin lesions
  • Stiffness when walking
  • Neurological abnormalities
U.S. Regions Where Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever May Affect Your Dog
Despite its name, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is prevalent throughout most of the United States, with the highest concentrations in the Rocky Mountain states, California and the Southeast.

------------------------------

You can go to the link for more examples. That link is not a complete list, but is a place to start if you are interested.



Clearly if the owner feels the dog is in need of emergency care, she should take the dog to the emergency vet!
 

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ThatKingCole,
If you don't take pup to the emergency vet today, you might at least call your regular vet first thing on Monday morning to describe the symptoms and see if you can get an appointment asap, rather than wait for the scheduled appointment.
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Calling Vet on Monday...

I will call a vet, we do not have a "regular" one because the people that owned these pits (next door) were breeding irrisponsibly for money and then could not sell them...I needed a couple of big dogs like a hole in my head...but then you know we fell in love!

The puppies were never contained and were starving. I kept feeding them until they wouldn't leave as we watched the other pups of the little get hit by a car (in front of our home), one froze to death and then there was one more that died (probably starved or froze) and they left it underneath the trailer. This is not a trailer park, but it is out in the country and a dumping ground for these poor animals.

I couldn't watch anymore. I took them in. They wanted me to pay them (kids) and I told them if you care about the dogs give them to me free and I will spend my money on caring for them, for their life. They then asked my husband to help them bury the one that was hit by a car...sickening.

Sorry to get off track...point being, they had already been to the vet as pups (before us) and we had them fixed through a free clinic an hour away that only does that for broke people.

I have an apt. next week, but tomorrow I need to see if I can't find one that can help us with regards to the bill...payment perhaps. I am waiting for a friend to tell me who her vet is, she has mentioned before that is quite reasonable.

Bella has been doing great since this morning. Still doing that limping thing, but happy and playful. No tremors. They are both under the covers, smashed up against one another...these are the cutest couple of dogs ever!

They think I am a dog too. When I am sleeping, sometimes I can't breath, only to find out I have one of my 65 lbs. pups on my head!!

ThatKingCole,
If you don't take pup to the emergency vet today, you might at least call your regular vet first thing on Monday morning to describe the symptoms and see if you can get an appointment asap, rather than wait for the scheduled appointment.
Good luck!
 

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So glad to hear Bella has been feeling better the second half of today! She is clearly very lucky to have found you and be under your care! :)

Hope you can get some answers from your vet soon. You might also ask about the possibility of a pinched nerve in the neck. That sort of thing can cause pain and trembling, along with lameness and the in-coordination you describe as she goes up the steps.

Here is a test you can do. If you take her bad paw, and just turn in under so she is standing on her knuckles, does she immediately place it correctly, pad side down, or does she leave it knuckled under for a second or two? This is a sort of "propioperception" test... seeing if the nervous system is telling the brain about the orientation of the paw correctly.

Is her lameness primarily front or back leg? Is it the same leg all the time, or does it change?
 

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Have the dogs been to a vet since you have had them? Pit bulls badly bred can have an array of health issues. I don't know if distemper causes seizures but if the dog has not been vaccinated in your care then this is a huge possibility.
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Have the dogs been to a vet since you have had them? Pit bulls badly bred can have an array of health issues. I don't know if distemper causes seizures but if the dog has not been vaccinated in your care then this is a huge possibility.
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Yes, the thought occurred to me too, that the dogs may not have been vaccinated by the first owner, although one might anticipate that the vet who did the spay would have made sure of vaccinations. TKC did state the dog was up on her shots.

Here are distemper symptoms.
Canine Distemper Signs & Symptoms - Canine Distemper - Animal Health Channel
 
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