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Hi my 2 and a half year old Great Dane Domino recently had what is believed to be a mammary tumour removed (we are awaiting test results), im just curious as to whether it is possible or dangerous to put her in pup before the recommended desexing? This is based on of course only if the tumour has not spread anywhere else. Any info appreciated...
 

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So... what you're saying is you want to know if you can breed your sick dog so she can have a bunch of sick puppies? That makes sense.
 
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So... what you're saying is you want to know if you can breed your sick dog so she can have a bunch of sick puppies? That makes sense.
Clearly you have not understood my question, I thought this was a frindly place I could go for help and advice and I don't appreciate the insinuation that I am an irresponsible dog owner and want to put my dog through anything that is not in the best interest of her health. Firstly I don't even know if it is a tumour, or if it is whether it's benign or malignant and I also already stated if it was and had spread obviously breeding is out of the question. I am after anyone that has knowledge of breeding after removing benign or isolated tumours. I have read that after such surgery the dog can be in perfect health and have no further problems? Anyone with some USEFUL info would be great thanks...
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Hi my 2 and a half year old Great Dane Domino recently had what is believed to be a mammary tumour removed (we are awaiting test results), im just curious as to whether it is possible or dangerous to put her in pup before the recommended desexing? This is based on of course only if the tumour has not spread anywhere else. Any info appreciated...

Yes it is dangerous. Your girl would be at risk of sever internal bleeding from carrying pups, she could die. Also Danes must be of full maturity before they should be bred - around 3 and a half at least, since most Danes are still growing at that age. Actually the best thing you should do is get her spayed ASAP, so you don't risk another tumour growing (very common). Also any female that has had such health issues shouldn't be bred for the fact that the puppies would possibly receive this trait if it's genetic, and that wouldn't be ethical in the sense of a responsible breeder.
 

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If you were an experienced breeder you would already understand the risks. Why do you want to breed your dog in the first place?
 

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Perhaps your veterinarian would be able to answer your question. He/she would be able to give you a real medical answer. Most folks here are not well trained in medicine so you are going to get answers from a variety of angles.

For example, my bias would be to recommend not to breed the dog, simply because issues like this are likely to have a genetic component, so why reproduce this? Giant breeds like Danes are already so prone to issues that a real expertise is needed to know how to avoid turning out puppies with all sorts of genetic issues, not just this tumor problem but also skeletal issues, eyesight, temperament and so forth.
Also, there are far too many puppies in the world already.

If you get an answer from Holly or Mythbuster though, you are getting a trained medical opinion.
 
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Please don't breed till the dog is mature.

Please don't breed a dog with potential health issues that haven't been diagnosed.

Unless the diagnosis is something as simple as a fatty deposit, there is almost always a genetic componant to the growth (malignant or not), please don't breed a dog that carries those genes.
 

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If this simply a medical issue then you could compromise her immune system by getting pregnant. Takes a lot out of a healthy female to carry a litter.

If it is a genetic issue then you would be producing pups with the same problem if not worse. This of course depends on the genetics of the male. You could actually have more genetic issues if you do not know the whole genetics of both dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Perhaps your veterinarian would be able to answer your question. He/she would be able to give you a real medical answer. Most folks here are not well trained in medicine so you are going to get answers from a variety of angles.

For example, my bias would be to recommend not to breed the dog, simply because issues like this are likely to have a genetic component, so why reproduce this? Giant breeds like Danes are already so prone to issues that a real expertise is needed to know how to avoid turning out puppies with all sorts of genetic issues, not just this tumor problem but also skeletal issues, eyesight, temperament and so forth.
Also, there are far too many puppies in the world already.

If you get an answer from Holly or Mythbuster though, you are getting a trained medical opinion.
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Perhaps your veterinarian would be able to answer your question. He/she would be able to give you a real medical answer. Most folks here are not well trained in medicine so you are going to get answers from a variety of angles.

For example, my bias would be to recommend not to breed the dog, simply because issues like this are likely to have a genetic component, so why reproduce this? Giant breeds like Danes are already so prone to issues that a real expertise is needed to know how to avoid turning out puppies with all sorts of genetic issues, not just this tumor problem but also skeletal issues, eyesight, temperament and so forth.
Also, there are far too many puppies in the world already.

If you get an answer from Holly or Mythbuster though, you are getting a trained medical opinion.
Thanks Tess my vet and I have had a brief discussion but will get more info today when we get results as that is really what will determine the answer here. She is a very special dog and the last thing I would do is jeopardize her health further if she is sick. I was just trying to gather as much info as possible...:)
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you were an experienced breeder you would already understand the risks. Why do you want to breed your dog in the first place?
I'd jut like to point out that ALL breeders start somewhere and they don't all start off with experience in every aspect! Hence why I have not rushed into anything and am trying to get info from other people who may have come across this. You know you can give someone a chance and not presume I'm just breeding for the sake of it! I am simply trying to make sure I can make an educated decision but I think I'll stick to my vet from now on as it seems most people on here would prefer to simply have a go at you instead of offering kind advice.
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Hi, Melzee! :)

I believe many of our members who breed started by mentoring under a breeder who shows their dogs and is bettering the breed with every litter. Many reputable breeders learn everything they can about their chosen breed by being involved in showing, sporting, or working for years prior to purchasing a quality sire or dam with generations of documented ancestry.

Please don't feel alienated. :) It is a sensitive topic, when about 60% of puppies born into the the US are euthanized each year. Perhaps you could look into local kennel clubs or working/sporting groups to find out more about Great Danes and all that it takes to become an ambassador of the breed?
 

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I'd jut like to point out that ALL breeders start somewhere and they don't all start off with experience in every aspect! Hence why I have not rushed into anything and am trying to get info from other people who may have come across this. You know you can give someone a chance and not presume I'm just breeding for the sake of it! I am simply trying to make sure I can make an educated decision but I think I'll stick to my vet from now on as it seems most people on here would prefer to simply have a go at you instead of offering kind advice.
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I don't think that it's that anyone wants to pick a fight with you, they are just deeply concerned that you are thinking about breeding a dog that may have a tumor.

Was your GD's dam and sire health and temperament tested, were they screened for breed specific inherited diseases? Does the breeder of your GD keep health records on his dogs? Are you planning to make sure that the male that you breed your female to has been screened for breed specific diseases? Have you had your female screened? Do you have the money for an emergency trip to the vet if she has trouble whelping?

This link is to the Great Dane Club of America and contains a list of diseases that are hereditary or prevalent in the breed and which can be screened for.Great Dane Club of America Health and Welfare

From the link:
Recommended disease screenings - OFA offers a public database where breeders can record the health status of their dogs. The minimum recommendations for the Great Dane to be used for breeding are a baseline at approximately two years with normal hip, heart, thyroid & eye results established. Heart & thyroid testing should be repeated at least every 2-3 years as results done on young adults do not remain valid for the life of the dog. Echocardiograms (for heart testing) are recommended for all adult Great Danes used for breeding, but are particularly important for stud dogs. Records of other disease issues should be maintained on all potential breeding stock (i.e. these four tests are not enough on their own). Note owners may wish to perform any &/or all of these tests on their own dogs, as health is a concern for all owners, not just breeders of Great Danes, and results publicly recorded can benefit the whole breed. For more information see the AKC-CHF's

I hope that your girl is alright and whatever the lump was it's nothing to be concerned about. I wish you the best of luck if you decide to breed her but please do a ton of research before you do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi, Melzee! :)

I believe many of our members who breed started by mentoring under a breeder who shows their dogs and is bettering the breed with every litter. Many reputable breeders learn everything they can about their chosen breed by being involved in showing, sporting, or working for years prior to purchasing a quality sire or dam with generations of documented ancestry.

Please don't feel alienated. :) It is a sensitive topic, when about 60% of puppies born into the the US are euthanized each year. Perhaps you could look into local kennel clubs or working/sporting groups to find out more about Great Danes and all that it takes to become an ambassador of the breed?
Hi seebrown thankyou for your advice. I myself am not actually thinking of starting my own breeding line. I have in fact got some friends who have their own great Dane kennel here in Australia and they were actually interested in my bitch as she is of exceptional type and temperament. I have spoken to them breifly about her lump and of course they too believe her health is first and foremost which was why my first step was a trip to the vet, I just like to know as much as possible from all avenues. And yes puppies can be a very sensitive topic!! Rescue centers etc are full and it's not just cross bred dogs taking up the space! Domino is our baby and we will do everything in our power to prolong her time with us as long as possible and if she needs to be desexed after we get results today then that is what will happen. We are just hoping it was just a fatty deposit or cyst for her sake not even for the sake is puppies! But thankyou for your KIND reply and advice it's much appreciated.. ?❤?
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I don't think that it's that anyone wants to pick a fight with you, they are just deeply concerned that you are thinking about breeding a dog that may have a tumor.

Was your GD's dam and sire health and temperament tested, were they screened for breed specific inherited diseases? Does the breeder of your GD keep health records on his dogs? Are you planning to make sure that the male that you breed your female to has been screened for breed specific diseases? Have you had your female screened? Do you have the money for an emergency trip to the vet if she has trouble whelping?

This link is to the Great Dane Club of America and contains a list of diseases that are hereditary or prevalent in the breed and which can be screened for.Great Dane Club of America Health and Welfare

From the link:



I hope that your girl is alright and whatever the lump was it's nothing to be concerned about. I wish you the best of luck if you decide to breed her but please do a ton of research before you do.
Thanks for the link I will check it out further and I've got some friends in the GD business who I'm getting advice from also. The last thing I would do is breed her if it's damaging to her or her pups. Thankyou I hope she is alright also, fingers crossed its a fatty lump I'd like her around for a few more years yet puppies or no puppies! She is most important.
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I'd jut like to point out that ALL breeders start somewhere and they don't all start off with experience in every aspect! Hence why I have not rushed into anything and am trying to get info from other people who may have come across this. You know you can give someone a chance and not presume I'm just breeding for the sake of it! I am simply trying to make sure I can make an educated decision but I think I'll stick to my vet from now on as it seems most people on here would prefer to simply have a go at you instead of offering kind advice.
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Yes every one who breeds starts some where. Before I bred a litter I studied the breed. I learned about what genetic conditions I had to avoid doubling up on and such. What was polygenic...autosomal recessive..autosomal dominant.... I also learned about what can happen..eclampsia..mummy pups..etc..everything to look for..signs and symptoms and everything that could happen.

Though a vet can help medically some do not know a lot of the genetic conditions in the breeds. There are however vets that specialize in breeding and genetics. Some family vets feel all females that have a uterus can be bred. If you really want good information. Find a GD breeder who has done if for years and knows everything about the breed. :)
 

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Vets see a lot of dogs and they are not aware off hand of every genetic condition that a dog might be prone to. I totally agree with finding a reputable breeder to talk with you about this. Your dog will need to be screened for whatever genetic tests are available that pertain to her breed. You should have copies of those tests for potential buyers. If this tumor is something genetic don't breed her. I'd be so angry if I received a dog prone to something like that and the breeder did not inform me (or bred that dog in the first place). Every dog is gonna have a health problem here or there but your job is to stack the odds in favor of the healthiest dog possible. Good temperament and pretty markings does not overrule health.
 

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If the mass comes back benign then no, there is no added medical risk to breeding her before you spay her and you don't necessarily have to worry about genetic spread since a lot of those benign mammary masses are due to hormones and not genetics.

The rest of the responses about the risks in general I would agree with. I don't agree with breeding in general and really wish you wouldn't breed her, but I have no problem giving you the facts.

Also, as an added input, when you DO spay her, you should have the vet do a prophylactic gastropexy to prevent a GDV as well.
 

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I agree, most vets have limited experience with breeding and breeds. Some do specialize in reproduction, and most can help you with medical issues of course, but general practice vets are not the best to use as a breeding mentor.
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I agree, most vets have limited experience with breeding and breeds. Some do specialize in reproduction, and most can help you with medical issues of course, but general practice vets are not the best to use as a breeding mentor.
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While that is true of a lot of vets, I would also caution the OP not to listen to everything even an experienced breeder says especially when it comes to medical things, even if they are breed specific. I've had owners come in and tell me that they don't want to give heartworm preventative or vaccinate for certain things because their breeder told them that the particular breed couldn't get heartworms or the particular breed couldn't get distemper etc... Or that they did or did not need certain procedures done. It's annoying to then have to correct them with actual medical information. Obviously an exception, but just be careful what you're told and you believe...
 
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