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Discussion Starter #1
I never take the event of me or anyone getting a dog a light event. I've always done research and think ahead. Soon I'm going to be off to school, and like many others around here, taking my dog with me. She'll be 6 when we leave and is starting to show her age. Unfortunately if anything is to happen to her requiring surgery, the vet informed us it's unlikely they'd work on her due to her heart murmur. So the potential odds of obtaining a new member of the family may be in the works. Looking into breeds, I've come down to either a Husky, Doberman, or Rhodesian Ridgeback. Of course, adoption isn't out of the question either.
 

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Those breeds can be incredibly difficult to find housing/apartments... even if you start in a place that allows them, you may not be as lucky in the future. Also life as a college student (assuming that's what you mean) is often quite busy and chaotic/unpredictable so a high energy dog requiring a lot of exercise and training may not be the best fit.

Probably best thing to do is to go to school, settle into your new routine, and then think about type of dog based on your lifestyle at that future time.:)
 

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I was thinking the same thing, hence why I'm considering it now while I still have lots of time.

As a rundown on how the situation would be, my cousin's actually taking the same course I'm planning on taking, and there's actually only 3 classes a week sometimes 4, roughly 1-2 hours. Exercise really won't be a problem, as I'm always running or walking. A nearby dog park too should help for off leash romps. I'll be taking the dog to obedience classes, making sure to socialize, etc. My education's paid for, and I've got a steady income of money so that shouldn't be a big problem.

Nothing's solid yet. It's just a potential plan should my dog take a turn for the worse. We had quite a scare last summer.
 

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Ridgebacks require a crazy amount of exercise . From my understanding, not a I run a couple miles a day kind of exercise but a multi-hour of intense running, playing, hiking, etc. kind of exercise. These guys where bred to be lion hunters after all.
 

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Would it be safe to assume the husky would be a better hiking companion? I haven't read or seen anything on it for ridgebacks as of yet
 

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Ok so a breakdown of what I know of those three breeds:

Husky:
- TONS of hair. All the time and especially when they blow out their coat 2x a year.
- Very difficult train reliable recall so off-leash walking is ill-advised.
- Can be very active dogs, but many actually are big couch potatoes and gain a lot of weight. However when younger they definitely need lots of exercise, which is harder to give them with just a leashed walk so things like urban mushing, skijoring, etc are advised.
- Definitely need a fenced back yard to let them play in (see point above)

Ridgebacks
- Still shed, but less hair so less noticeable
- Difficult as puppies: independent, smart, high energy but if you can make it through adolescence they are wonderful loving dogs
- roamers. They can be trained for recall but you need to be VERY consistent about it and these dogs are bred to go and go and go and to CHASE.
- typically protective of their owners so reactivity to people and other dogs is an issue that needs to be monitored

Doberman I can't speak to as I have little experience with them.

All three of these are quite tough breeds that require a lot of time for training, grooming (husky), and exercise. They're all perfectly capable hiking partners (on leash) but I don't think Huskies or Ridgebacks are great off-leash (huskies ever and ridgebacks while their young).

I would post on breed specific forums to get more detailed responses as those folks will know much more about suitability for ownership and the like.
 

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There's a lot of info above that's being missed. Huskies love to run-and this can mean away from you, it can mean pulling on walks, and escaping enclosures in order to run around. Very prey drive-not good with other animals, typically.

Ridgebacks actually have been bred for a spine defect to get the ridge - so expect health issues.

Dobermans were bred for working as guard dogs - they're less likely to be friendly with strangers (as a college student living in tight areas this will be a big deal) and will alert bark on their own.

I think the firs thing you should look at is how much energy you want in your dog. Do you want them to have energy all the time and go go go, or do you want them to be energetic sometimes but then laze around? After this temperament would play a big role...what is your lifestyle like? Would you be okay not inviting people or other dogs over? Do you plan on having small animals? Are you very cuddly and want that in your dog, or are you okay with a dog that hates hugs entirely? What type of training can you provide easily (do you want to have to teach bath time to be a fun thing, or do you want a water dog who LOVES it)? Maybe answer a few of these questions and we can help you speculate for a future breed :)
 

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@Kwenami I didn't know it was a Spine defect that caused the ridge I just thought that was how the hire grew sometimes (I knew that there are Ridgeless Ridgebacks). I know quite a few Rhoddies, what and interesting tidbit.
 

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@Kwenami I never knew this either about ridgebacks, though they seem healthier than some other dog breeds out there. In my experience with dobermans and rotties they both loved people. Never barked when someone knocked on the door, rung the doorbell, etc. In fact I had to teach the one to sit and wait for the visitor to approach him he got so excited. It's always been the dachshund that went crazy over strangers and potential prey. She definitely could put a dog like a husky to shame when it comes to howling.

With energy level, I want a dog I can take for daily walks and runs and the less common hike every now and again (can only drive so much with how much gas is). With my lifestyle it's mostly myself and the odd friend or two coming over every now and then. Either way the dog will get properly socialized which I always consider necessary. The only small animal I would worry over is my brother's cat, but she wouldn't be over anyway. I'm not huge on a cuddle monster, hence why my girl often finds herself in her bed after a while.
 
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