Dog Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!
My girlfriend has a doodle (hypoallergenic dog). I noticed when the dog licks my neck or face, it tends to get red afterwards.
I was myself diagnosed with an allergy to animals as a child (8-9 years old) but am now 30. My parents have had a cat for years and I lived with the cat for year without symptoms so I assumed had faded away.
I've spent a few days at a time at my girlfriend without issue (besides my neck, that doesn't hurt, but physically goes red). We are now talking of moving in together.
Apart from the obvious (I shouldn't let her dog lick me), has anyone ever experienced this? Can an immunity be built over time? Do you have any tips for people with a diagnosed allergy that have been able to live with a dog?

Thank you for your help,
 

· Registered
Joined
·
764 Posts
I would get yourself hooked up with a good allergy doctor if you haven't already. Someone I knew with asthma moved in with his girlfriend and her cats. One hot August night the combination of humid weather, high pollen count and exposure to the cats triggered a fatal asthma attack.

In general it seems people can be sensitive to the saliva, to the skin oils and dandruff, and/or to allergens such as pollen that collect in the hair. People sometimes are more tolerant of dogs such as poodles & some doodles. One reason is that poodle coats don't shed: allergens that normally fall off the dog with the loose hair instead stay stuck to the dog. Another is that poodle coats are high maintenance: the dog typically goes to the groomer and gets the accumulated allergens washed off every few weeks. However, if the dog isn't getting groomed regularly, or if the dog goes rolling in the grass during pollen season, enough allergens will build up in the coat to cause problems for some people.

I would suggest making sure the dog gets bathed and blow dried (preferably somewhere other than your living space) regularly. My standard poodles go into the groomer monthly; poodle people who bathe at home sometimes do it as often as weekly. I would also set up an air filter in rooms where you and the dog hang out. You might also want to put slip covers on the furniture and toss them in the wash weekly. And, as I mentioned, get hooked up with a doctor who specializes in allergies. I'm just some internet rando without a medical degree. ;)
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top