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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey,

So I wasn't sure I would return here after some previous 'drama' from now-blocked users, but those of you that have helped me have been so nice and I really do want some advice from an outside source, so here I am again.

So, my rescue pup Emmy gave me TONS of issues in the past. She has progressed beautifully lately and we're talking of getting a second one. Since we got her we knew she did better with another dog around but we were focused on adjusting her and having her settle in that we didn't even think of getting another one. But she's been with us 5 months and there's a huge adopt-a-thon coming up, and we're going to go look.
Now, this new dog will be a puppy-puppy. When we got Emmy she was already about 6 months old (I will never rescue that age again after having all the issues we've had with her!) so we missed that "OH MY GOD SHE'S SO CUTE" phase of puppies. We're not ready for a 6-12 month dog with issues from being in a shelter or a bad past, so we will adopt a 6-10 week old given they have the right size, temperament, etc.
We've listed pros and cons and the pros win. She's so much happier with another dog around that the neighborhood 'Tramp' has spent a few hours in the house with her because she adores him so (and vice versa). So we have high hopes that a puppy will help her adjust even more, hopefully where strangers and cars are concerned.

Okay, sorry! Getting off track. It's been so long since we've had a young puppy in the house and I was 13 at the time so, yes, I am very puppy rusty. I think, for the most part, I remember how to deal with a new addition but sleeping arrangements will be brand new. Last time we had a new puppy the other dogs slept with my parents and the puppy (who was mine) slept with me, so it was very different than my situation now.

My main question:

Where does the new puppy sleep? Emmy has confinement issues so we gate rooms off at night and she has access to the bedroom, hall and attached stairs, and the living room as she likes to sleep between the couch and her bed at night. I don't want a new puppy to have a stair accident or get into anything that Emmy now leaves alone, but I'm not sure Emmy will be quiet with a puppy in the crate all night. Any suggestions/ideas on where to have the new puppy sleep for a while until it can have the nighttime access Emmy does?

Another I just thought of:
Emmy has a strong prey drive. We're planning on getting a puppy that will be about her size (30 lb) when fully grown but the size of a puppy is causing us a little hesitation. A friend's Chihuahua can no longer come over because as soon as he ran he went from dog to rabbit in her mind. We're hoping since the puppy will grow that she won't do this to it or that maybe she'll realize it's a puppy and be more gentle, but has anyone had any experience with a high prey drive dog (Emmy is Beagle/Golden Retriever mix) and adding in a puppy? I would love some tips on handling what I hope I don't have to.

I'm sure there are more but like I said there are no guarantees we're getting a puppy at the adopt-a-thon, but we are going to look and see if there's a match for us. If we get one, I'm sure I'll be here sleep-deprived begging you guys for more advice.

Thanks!
 

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Welcome back!

I too am glad former drama loving members have been blocked so I'm glad you came back here!

Please make sure the pup is at least 8 weeks old, any younger and it should still be with its mum.

Also I just skimmed through your previous thread, I take it Emmys problems have been solved? Has she met many puppies? How did she react? I'd try and see first how she reacts to puppies seeing as she has high prey drive for small dogs.

On where to sleep seeing as you'll have a clean slate to work with I'd think about crate training. They are great tools for house training, alone time, if you need to travel in the car, transporting safely, a safe place for them to go if they need to escape, all that good stuff. I've never dealt with a young pup as Buster was 10 months when he came to us, but many suggest having the crate neXt to your bed for the first while allowing pup to see and smell you and settle down for the night. And as pup gets older you can move the crate further away from the bed :) you make their crate a safe and fun place, always getting fun toys and yummy treats in there, make it super cosy for them to sleep and relax in :)

I don't have much experience in dealing with high prey drive so I'm sure another member will come along and give you a hand :)
 
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Welcome back!

I too am glad former drama loving members have been blocked so I'm glad you came back here!

Please make sure the pup is at least 8 weeks old, any younger and it should still be with its mum.

Also I just skimmed through your previous thread, I take it Emmys problems have been solved? Has she met many puppies? How did she react? I'd try and see first how she reacts to puppies seeing as she has high prey drive for small dogs.

On where to sleep seeing as you'll have a clean slate to work with I'd think about crate training. They are great tools for house training, alone time, if you need to travel in the car, transporting safely, a safe place for them to go if they need to escape, all that good stuff. I've never dealt with a young pup as Buster was 10 months when he came to us, but many suggest having the crate neXt to your bed for the first while allowing pup to see and smell you and settle down for the night. And as pup gets older you can move the crate further away from the bed :) you make their crate a safe and fun place, always getting fun toys and yummy treats in there, make it super cosy for them to sleep and relax in :)

I don't have much experience in dealing with high prey drive so I'm sure another member will come along and give you a hand :)
I'll definitely ask the shelters/rescue groups at the adopt-a-thon the puppy's age to double check - thanks!

Emmy has not met a single puppy since I've had her. But she's met plenty of young/adult dogs and has loved them all. So we're not sure how she'll do with a puppy but based on how she acts towards other dogs in general I think she'll do okay - I'm just worried about the size because of the prey drive. I don't know anyone with a puppy to have her meet, so I'm not sure how I could ever make that happen. :/

The majority of her issues have gotten so much better most people tell me she's a different dog. Her main issues now are being afraid of strangers (which has gotten better) and going for car rides (she's still terrified of cars).

I agree a crate is great but I don't see Emmy being quiet with a puppy in a crate in my room while she sleeps a few feet away. I think she'll want the puppy with her and even if the puppy is fine and wants to sleep, Emmy will bark at the puppy wanting it out of the crate. I cannot for the life of me remember how I did the first few nights with my last new puppy. I think I just puppy-proofed the room and had him on his bed, and I tried to get up every few hours to take him out. With Emmy in the mix, I'm not sure how to have two sleep together without one confined. I can't close the bedroom door without Emmy having a dog panic attack, so I'm really struggling with how to do sleeping for them both.
 

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What about adopting a dog that is past adolescence? Maybe in the range of 2 to 4 years old? I would go with a dog that has lived in a foster home setting with other dogs. I'd also suggest arranging for a two-week trial period before the adoption is finalized.
 

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What about adopting a dog that is past adolescence? Maybe in the range of 2 to 4 years old? I would go with a dog that has lived in a foster home setting with other dogs. I'd also suggest arranging for a two-week trial period before the adoption is finalized.
Everyone in the house is against a second dog unless it's a puppy. :/ I have a trainer friend who says bringing in an older dog with Emmy being just under a year might cause more issues with her specifically and that a dog younger than her is a better idea.

I do think the trial period is a great idea though; I'll see if the shelter/rescue will allow that if we find a potential.
 

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Keep in mind that even a puppy that young can have issues; age isn't a guarantee of a 'clean slate' (been there).

If you can, maybe look for a puppy that was born from a dog in foster care - they're not terribly uncommon and if you can see what the mother's like you may at least have a better picture that you otherwise would of the pup.

Is there anyone else the puppy can sleep in a crate with? I've actually always had puppies just sleep in bed with me and then I take them out, but that can get messy and I've always kind of regretted not crate training earlier.
 

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Keep in mind that even a puppy that young can have issues; age isn't a guarantee of a 'clean slate' (been there).

If you can, maybe look for a puppy that was born from a dog in foster care - they're not terribly uncommon and if you can see what the mother's like you may at least have a better picture that you otherwise would of the pup.

Is there anyone else the puppy can sleep in a crate with? I've actually always had puppies just sleep in bed with me and then I take them out, but that can get messy and I've always kind of regretted not crate training earlier.
That's a good idea about a puppy born into foster care. We're making a list of things to ask/look for!

No, I can't think of any. :/ Emmy has mild resource guarding with the couch we're working on, so in no way is she allowed on the bed(s) so I don't want to start a new puppy on the bed - not a fan of them on the bed, anyway. So maybe the crate? Ugh, I'm really not sure what to do about sleeping!
 

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Hallo!

We were pushed into bringing a puppy home when our first dog, Kasper, was 2 years old...we were supposed to do emergency fostering, but we ended up keeping the puppy - oops! :)

When we adopted Kasper he was 9 months old. He was untrained, overly energetic, had separation anxiety, resource guarded, had high prey drive and was fearful of strangers. He was a handful :D

When we brought Zoey (the puppy) home we had already worked on and improved many of Kasper's "issues". However he hated Zoey to begin with (we didn't introduce them as well as we could) and there was lots of growling, stiffening and resource guarding. We worked through this. Within a week they were fine playing together, but to this day Kasper will RG toys from Zoey. We simply don't have toys out when they're together - they are happy to playfight with each other, and get toys when one is crated / in the playpen :D

I will say we had no issue with Kasper's prey drive, he never chased the puppy other than if they were playing...but then again he has met plenty of Chi's on walks and has never seen them as prey either.

Zoey was (is :p ) extremely noisy and whiny...I put this down to her being from a pet shop, where I imagine she was rewarded constantly for whining by customers fussing her. We actually had her crate downstairs in our living room, and slept next to her on the sofa bed, with Kasper. He paid no attention to her whining at all, it didn't bother him in the slightest. When Zoey was about 5 months old we returned to sleeping upstairs, and this didn't upset her in the slightest.
 

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I can echo @PoppyKenna's advice that puppies aren't as clean of a slate as you may think. If they haven't come from a place where socialization occurred early (like 4 weeks) with humans they may be much more fearful - a great example is my dog. She wasn't really handled as a pup and has a lot of fear issues now that she is an adult. I got her at 8 weeks, did all the classes, did the socialization with dogs, cats and people, etc. and still she's a fear, unconfident, dog reactive mess. Though it's getting better and better every day with work, we can now have other dogs in the house!

Anyway, I just want you to make sure that your dog is ready for a second house mate. Make sure to find a good match, and if you're not sure have a trainer/rescue worker match you up. A confident adolescent or adult would be better matched, but if your prepared for additional work then a confident puppy should work too.

Good luck, and remember to share puppy pictures!
 

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I don't want to start a new puppy on the bed - not a fan of them on the bed, anyway. So maybe the crate? Ugh, I'm really not sure what to do about sleeping!
A crate right by your bed is better. It enables you to hear the pup if it wakes up and needs to go out at night. Sounds like your dog has already established where she like to sleep so it should not disrupt her. I had not had a puppy for about 20 years and had forgotten how much you have to do with a puppy. My rescued for years had always been 6 months or older. Getting up every 2 hours to take the puppy out then trying to get them back to sleep takes a huge portion of the night. When do you get to sleep? The answer is in about 3 months. Welcome back and good luck with your new pup. If you get the puppy blues this is a good place to get support.
 
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