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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have two miniature American Eskimos who are both sisters and are 7 years old. Ever since they were puppies, one has always been bigger than the other, but they are both healthy and get good exercise. Since about 5 years old, the bigger one started having hip issues and trouble doing certain things. Having owned this breed before, we were aware that this is a common problem among many eskies and the vet confirmed that she was fine. She has seen the vet many times since and it didn't seem too much of an issue to them and we never considered surgery or anything. Her hips have since gotten worse and we've come to the conclusion that she may be suffering as a result of hip dysplasia. She is very delicate and doesn't like to be away from her sister, so we would not want to put her through a surgery like this. She is also very active and the recovery would probably be very hard as it can last up to 10 weeks long. Other than surgery, are they any other safe and effective options? Anything would help and we just want to get her back to feeling herself again. Thank you and stay safe!!!

We will be consulting the vet about this as well, but I am asking for any advice from other people who have knowledge about this or have gone through this.
 

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As far as I'm aware, once the joint has deteriorated it can only be fixed surgically. Things like keeping her weight low and painkillers will help with the pain.

But at her age, she could have a lot of years of pain ahead - would it not be worth considering the long term benefit for the short term difficulties?
 

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You need to have your Vet do a workup on her, including Xray's, which will show the degree of deterioration, and will provide good information as to what would be the most effective treatment plan for her. We on this forum are not Vets and can only offer best guesses, not real information, which is what you need to formulate an appropriate treatment plan.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thank you! I just wanted to see if anybody had any useful information or has gone through this before. I understand that you aren't Vets but I will definitely take her as soon as possible. Stay safe! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thank you! I will definitely consider surgery and will be taking her to the vet as soon as I can. I appreciate you replying, as I wanted to see if there were other options if anyone had gone through this before. Stay safe :)
 

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I have two miniature American Eskimos who are both sisters and are 7 years old. Ever since they were puppies, one has always been bigger than the other, but they are both healthy and get good exercise. Since about 5 years old, the bigger one started having hip issues and trouble doing certain things. Having owned this breed before, we were aware that this is a common problem among many eskies and the vet confirmed that she was fine. She has seen the vet many times since and it didn't seem too much of an issue to them and we never considered surgery or anything. Her hips have since gotten worse and we've come to the conclusion that she may be suffering as a result of hip dysplasia. She is very delicate and doesn't like to be away from her sister, so we would not want to put her through a surgery like this. She is also very active and the recovery would probably be very hard as it can last up to 10 weeks long. Other than surgery, are they any other safe and effective options? Anything would help and we just want to get her back to feeling herself again. Thank you and stay safe!!!

We will be consulting the vet about this as well, but I am asking for any advice from other people who have knowledge about this or have gone through this.
Some time ago, our shepherd displayed those symptoms, so my wife, who suffers from severe RA gave him some prednisone from her supply for a few days until we could get him to the vet. Worked admirably and the vet prescribed the same thing. We are due for another visit today for a blood test and hope we can keep him on something to keep him out of pain. An expensive operation is out of the question because of our low income.
 

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Please be aware that giving medication without veterinary advice is not advisable. Dogs metabolise some drugs differently from humans do you can't just dose by maths. I'm glad it worked out for you but it is not something to be recommended.
 

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As sentient adults, I and my wife are fully aware of the consequences, but we prefer, especially in the current atmosphere, to care for our pets as best we can when possible. Our actions in the last fifty or so years have been overwhelmingly beneficial, and never injurious and, in that time, we have had many canine members of our family suffer from various maladies. If you wish, you can remove me from this forum for my so contempible behaviour.
 

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No need to take offense, please try to see it from our perspective. If someone recommends a human medication, and a dog has a bad reaction, we don't want to be held accountable for any part of that.
 
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