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My 8 year old cat, Tilly, is in the process of having tests for possible diabetes. Our vet has tested her urine & done a basic blood test, he is also sending some bloods off to the lab for further testing. If confirmed we will have her on a specialist food & I will have to inject her twice a day. Thankfully she is insured, so cost shouldn't be a problem (until they put the premium up next year I guess :rolleyes:) So, my question is, do any of you guys have experience of this & how to manage it, also, is this likely shorten her life span? I'd quite like to hear positive stories if possible as I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed by it all at the moment :(
Judy x
 

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This being a dog forum I'm not sure how many responses you'll get. However, when it comes to animals there's so many variables. First it depends on how severe the disease is. It depends on how well the animal responds to treatment physically. It depends on how well it responds to you giving it it's medicine. It also depends on how well the anima does emotionally. I've had friends with very sick animals respond well and tolerate treatment well, and I've had friends with very, very healthy animals simply not respond, or physically respond but mentally not want to deal with the treatment and go downhill fast. You just can't predict it.

The most important thing for you to do is to be positive and treat this like you're simply brushing your teeth. I'm not sure about cats but in dogs I learned that one of teh best way you can calm it is by sitting, stretching and yawning. You're signaling it's safe to rest. The animals above that fared the best had owner who treated their diseases as no big deal, yet internally took it seriously. Animals NEED to know you're ok or they won't be.
 

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Thanks for your reply. Yes, my challenge will be learning to administer the injection. I had my '3am' panic during the night, when I was thinking this is going to be tough, Tilly doesn't really like being handled (but will happily curl up on your lap!) The last thing I want is her being a stressed little kitty :( & what do I do when we go on vacation :confused: So, we will give it a go & hopefully it will become second nature for both of us eventually.
 

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Well, just spoke to vet & although results do show diabetes, it's not as severe as he first thought. He wants to start her on injections but is confident we may be able to go on to oral meds eventually. So fingers crossed she responds to her special diet & the injections well :thumbsup:
 

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Hang in there. Diabetes is very common in older cats and easy to manage. The injections are given subq (under the skin) with a very small needle in the scruff of the neck every 12 hours. Your vet will probably do a diabetic curve (kitty stays for the day normally three days in a row to find the correct amount of insulin.) After that depending on your vet they will do fructosamine levels every 6 months to a year to determine that kitty is maintaining proper insulin levels. I work for a vet and teach how to give insulin injections all the time. Your vet should give you take home instructions for caring for your diabetic kitty. Good luck. Hope this was of help.Ask your vet for a kennel or pet sitter in your area who cares for diabetic animals for when you go on vacation. Planning ahead will relieve future stress.
 
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