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I'm looking for a different approach with my puppy. A lot of her issues are on the leash but she's also reactive to people that come over to our house. She gets overcome with excitement and she jumps, bows, barks, and carries on. She's ALWAYS restrained either in a crate or tether.

My previous trainer said for me to throw treats in her crate when people come over. By the handfuls. I'm assuming this was in effort for her not to cross threshold. We work on this 2-3 days a week. She always calms down after 5-10 minutes and can be let out. At that point she can be controlled by treats. But I've been using this strategy for 2 months and it's not getting better. She still acts crazy initially.

What about planned ignoring and letting her self-soothe and then she's rewarded for calm behavior? That's how I trained her to stop going nuts in her crate. She would paw, jump, cry, and dance around so hard that I thought she was going to hurt herself. One time she set off my house alarm she was throwing such a fit. But I ignored it. Stood there until she was quiet and sat - then she got out. Do you think a similar strategy would work for the reactivity? If not, suggestions please. And please don't tell me to continue to shower her with treats. It's not working.
 

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I have had success with requiring a pup to show some restraint before being able to indulge in what is making it lose its crap. "Civility" on your terms requires consistent application and blatant direction so the dog gets the message.
 

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I have had success with requiring a pup to show some restraint before being able to indulge in what is making it lose its crap. "Civility" on your terms requires consistent application and blatant direction so the dog gets the message.

Can you give an example? I may be doing this in some ways. For instance - she waits for her food. When I first got her she would jump on my hand as I was feeding her and spill it. Now she sits and waits until I give her the release word. This is one thing she does well. She would wait however long I made her.
 

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I can't imagine throwing handfuls of treats to a crated dog. Its not teaching them anything. If someone is coming over, I would have treats ready but I would have the individual approach the dog so the dog could get a smell and then say "good boy, come on" and then take the dog a bit further away and give a treat if the dog behaved appropriately.
 

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My previous trainer said for me to throw treats in her crate when people come over. By the handfuls. I'm assuming this was in effort for her not to cross threshold.
Well, a good trainer would have explained the rationale to you. Personally, I fail to see the logical connection between being in a crate while getting carpet-bombed with treats and developing proper greeting etiquette. Chances are your dog is scratching his head, too (after greedily gobbling the treats, of course!).

With strangers/visitors, it's hard to get them "educated" enough to assist with training proper greeting behavior. This link goes through the basics. For cases where I can't have the stranger/visitor do the right thing, I restrain/manage with a leash/collar hold to preclude jumping. While walking on leash, we work on "look" (at me) when she starts to veer off to a stranger she wants to befriend. Treats follow immediately after proper behavior.
 

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I'd wait it out. Wait for 5 seconds of quiet, calm, behavior before giving the dog what it was acting crazy to have. Using my boy as an example. He'll occasionally demand bark to get me to come inside, since I do not want a dog that barks, and barks, to get me to come back I'll stand outside the door slowly counting to 5, and each time he barks I reset the count. Usually it will go something like this 1,2,3...BARK...1,2....BARK...1,2....BARK.....1,2,3,4 and so on until I finally reach 5 and open the door and go in. After a day or two of that he learns, or remembers, that barking gets him nothing and being quiet gets me to come in.

I'd also recommend reinforcing calm behavior, here's a Kikopup video on how to go about it
 
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Can you give an example? I may be doing this in some ways. For instance - she waits for her food. When I first got her she would jump on my hand as I was feeding her and spill it. Now she sits and waits until I give her the release word. This is one thing she does well. She would wait however long I made her.
Example: Dog gets overamped when greeting people. Dog is on a lead in heel position as we approach a person, dog forges toward the individual, I immediately do an about-face and walk away maybe 10-20 feet. Reset the dog in a sit in the heel position and then proceed toward the person again. As long as the dog holds the heel discipline ( no forging toward the person ) we continue towards the person. If the dog breaks again as the distance is closed, another about-face and walk away. The dog only gets what it wants ( meeting a person perhaps ) if it maintains some "civility". Your situation " she's also reactive to people that come over to our house. She gets overcome with excitement and she jumps, bows, barks, and carries on." is one which could be remedied using this method. If the people that come over to your house are willing to work with you for a bit, just practice this method. Yes, it might take many times of turning around and resetting the dog and then approaching again but the dog will soon learn in order to get to its desire it must conduct itself in a certain fashion. If one allows the dog to continue its antics/reactivity then the dog will continue being that way.
 
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