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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

Has anyone ever purchased a pet stroller as an alternative to a crate/carrier for a puppy? I've been researching online about socialising puppies under 12 weeks old and from what I understand, there can be really harmful diseases such as parvo around dog crowded areas (anywhere where there may be dogs who are infected) but it is also really important to bring the puppy out to different places between 8 - 12 weeks.

I will be getting a puppy next month. I don't have a car and cannot drive by myself yet but my parents have cars so I can take the puppy in my mum's car to socialise him for the first week he arrives. But my mum will be going overseas for three weeks and my dad won't be home until later at night so I'm planning to take the puppy out myself to different cafe, the shops, other places (city) and the vet as well as puppy socialising classes.

The problem is since I don't have a car, I will need to take the bus or train to get to a lot of places. My house is 15 minutes walk from the train station so I need to walk with my puppy to the train station in order to reach these places. There's going to be more walking after getting of the bus or train too. There's a lot of dogs in my neighbourhood so I don't want to let my puppy walk on the ground on our way to the train/bus station in case he catches some disease such as parvo until he gets all his vaccinations. I'm also concerned that carrying him in a crate/ carrier /in my arms might become too heavy for me as he is not a small puppy and considering I need to walk a lot.

So is getting a pet stroller a good idea in this case ($50-$100) or am I crazy for putting a puppy in a stroller? Is there a better alternative to a pet stroller? :ponder:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No idea really about the stroller, but very excited for you!
Thank you! I'm super excited to. My whole family is counting the days haha I'm glad my mother got over her dislike for dogs after taking care of the kelpie from the elderly owner.
 

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We don't have a car or drive either, and we have a 10 week old puppy. A few weeks before Raiden came home we bought a second hand pram / pushchair for £20 online...it was much cheaper than all the doggy ones I looked at, and the pushchair we got is awesome; you can have it facing the person pushing or away, and you can have it upright or horizontal so it works really well.

We started doing lots of calming work in the pushchair and it went really well...we've slacked a little since then so I need to get back on that, but here's little Rey chilling in his pram :)



Of course if you don't mind paying extra / can't find a second hand pram go with the dog stroller ;)

We've waited until he's full vaccinated (which will be next week) to take him out in the pushchair, and have been carrying him in our arms out and about until then...my thinking was in the pushchair he's closer to the ground and I didn't know if he could pick up diseases easier? I really have no idea though, and if most are the result of coming into contact with infected poo / wee I don't see why a pushchair would be an issue :confused:

I had someone I know use a sling, like people use for babies, for their puppy too. That worked really well, although the pup was a small breed and you said your boy's gonna be big :D
 

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I have to admit that the idea of putting a dog in a stroller is a strange one to me, closely akin to those who literally treat their dogs as infant humans. The vast majority of people, I'm willing to bet almost all of them, don't need or use a stroller to socialize their puppy while it's small even in places crowded by dogs. Parvo is a possibility anywhere but it's unlikely to be lurking at literally every corner.

If it were dog parks, I'd say avoid them due to age, but just passing on the street? I doubt there'll be a problem, just avoid the places you know dogs congregate as opposed to 'may have wandered past once or twice'. I certainly wouldn't spend 50-100$ on something like strollers designed for dogs.

In spite of the risk of parvo, people still attend puppy training classes, which are always held in the same places other dogs have been. Don't let your pup walk where you think, specifically, another dog has left a pile, as that's how it gets onto the ground.. which isn't going to be most places human foot traffic travels. Puppy classes will require the first set of vaccinations, which will help with protections.

Skip the stroller. Use the opportunity to teach leach training and your own awareness of the area for possible/likely poop spots.

Edit: Also you can simply speak to your vet and ask what the current prevalence of parvo is in your area. In MANY places it's perishingly rare to begin with thanks to high vaccination rates and herd immunity.
 

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I have a friend who uses a stroller for her dog at shows and events. Each time I see it, I want one! :p
She has back issues so her stroller makes things much easier for her. Her's is enclosed so serves as a crate and she can also load up her gear so no carrying heavy bags.

You'll of course want to teach your puppy to walk nicely in new places, but personally I think a stroller would be fine for your needs. A walk, bus/train ride, an hour class, and then return trip is likely to be a lot for a very young pup. Your pup will probably nap a bit on the way home in the stroller if comfy in there.

Also I would imagine you might need a crate or something to keep your puppy in for the bus/train? A enclosed stroller would be portable and hopefully meet requirements if there are rules about it.

Just find a balance. You don't want to keep your puppy in a stroller every second of each outing. But for travel on a bus or train and naps on very long/taxing outings I say go for it!:)
 

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@Redwood I agree that the idea of it freaks me out a bit but the practicalities do soften my views on it.

It's brilliant for disabled or elderly dogs so they can still go out and aren't cooped inside.

I also saw a young pyranese pup in one, too big to carry and too young to walk. Better than being isolated inside until 16 weeks.

Would I get one? depends on the size of the pup, my travel arrangements (do I have a car) and infection rates. Right now im in a place with very low infection rates so as long as I stay away from dog parks I would take the risk and walk a pup and socialise it well.

I wouldn't keep it in it all the time, but if you are concerned about parvo ect it is a good compromise.

I imagine as in your case it is also very convenient when using public transport and travel alot even after vaccination an hour walk is going to be too much and it is uncomfortable to carry it even if its a toy breed, and you can keep your purse and shopping underneath usually (atlease with prams for babies).
 

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Some dog illnesses like Kennel Cough are airborne...so the pup would still be susceptible to some things. I personally think strollers for dogs are a bit ridiculous, but if you have no other way to get your dog around it's probably the best option.
 

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Will the public transport system, allow a dog on the bus, stroller or not? I didn't see if you check that out or not.

If you would rather save your money, or perhaps spend less, as some suggested, a trip to a thrift shop might turn up a stroller that would work for a lot less money.

Also, if the walks are not too long and the puppy can rest on the bus and such, maybe even some booties might solve the problem, something you can wash after each walk. I had a very old dog once, who's feet really hurt her on winter mornings when the temps were 5 below zero or colder. I ended up buying a large package of baby socks and sliding them on her feet before she went outside.

She looked rather silly, but she immediately felt the difference and I never had to run out and pick her up to bring her in when she had the socks on, without the socks she would end up just standing in one spot, and whining, and then make a few crippled up looking steps towards the house and stop again. Fortunately, around here that -5 to -20 below zero weather usually only lasts about 2 weeks in the winter. Once the temps were back up around zero and above, she didn't need the socks.

That was back in the early 1980's.. I'm sure now days there are sources to buy light weight footwear made just for dogs...

EDIT: Had to go look... found these and similar items, so yeah, they're out there...lol

http://www.miniinthebox.com/yellow-frog-fashion-socks-with-non-slip-for-pets-dogs_p965297.html

http://www.dogquality.com/products/...mBTmm4b9XJjsciFlo_jSbk8GEZwfXiYlBoaAk-M8P8HAQ

Stormy
 

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Oh, forgot to add. To me, $100 dollars sounds like a huge expense for something that might only be used for a few months...as the puppy either out grows the stroller, or comes the time he can get the shots and parvo isn't such a huge concern.

I would think, walking a dog on a leash is a lot easier than shoving a stroller up and down bus steps, etc...

I can understand your concern about the parvo, but think too that there are probably less expensive ways to get around the exposure to it. But, all that also depends upon a person's income level.. For me $100.00 is a lot of money, but others, it might just be chump change. If that is the case...then I suppose it's a good way to make you feel better about keeping your pupppy a bit more safe.

Stormy
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Will the public transport system, allow a dog on the bus, stroller or not? I didn't see if you check that out or not.


Stormy
Yes here in Melbourne, I'm allowed to take the dog on public transport as long as he is controlled (train) or crated (bus).
 

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There is a couple who live near me and they have a puppy and a 3 year old dog, they use a stroller because a walk that is long enough for dog is too long for the puppy, and they don't want to walk them separately, so the puppy walks part of the way then curls up in the stroller when he is tired!

I see it as a good way to take a dog further than they could walk due to physical limitations/age, but not sure how much more disease prevention it would afford beyond just being careful.
 

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If you are traveling, i definitely suggest a doggie stroller! I have one, and it is very handy!! My mom was a little confused at first to why I had gotten it. But they're very cute and easy to travel with! (And your arm will certainly not get tired with a doggie stroller!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you are traveling, i definitely suggest a doggie stroller! I have one, and it is very handy!! My mom was a little confused at first to why I had gotten it. But they're very cute and easy to travel with! (And your arm will certainly not get tired with a doggie stroller!)
Thank you for the suggestion. Yes I did purchase a pet stroller for $50 from ebay and it is great (I have not yet met my puppy) so I'm just currently purchasing all the toys, tools, kennel, kelpie training books before he arrives.

Money isn't too big of a concern for me right now as I do work casual with good pay and also have a teaching job lined up for next year. I'm also living at home so buying the stroller and paying for other puppy related expenses is not too stressful. I'll be travelling a lot with the puppy for socialising from October - January so I think a puppy stroller is a good idea just to take away some stress on my shoulders and arms as I don't need to carry a crate around or carry him in my arms for a few hours. He can also take a nap in the stroller when he wants to.
 

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Thank you for the suggestion. Yes I did purchase a pet stroller for $50 from ebay and it is great (I have not yet met my puppy) so I'm just currently purchasing all the toys, tools, kennel, kelpie training books before he arrives.

Money isn't too big of a concern for me right now as I do work casual with good pay and also have a teaching job lined up for next year. I'm also living at home so buying the stroller and paying for other puppy related expenses is not too stressful. I'll be travelling a lot with the puppy for socialising from October - January so I think a puppy stroller is a good idea just to take away some stress on my shoulders and arms as I don't need to carry a crate around or carry him in my arms for a few hours. He can also take a nap in the stroller when he wants to.
That is really wonderful! Wish you all of luck with your new pup :)
 

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When my little 10-lb puppy torqued her knee and was on 2-months crate rest, I was kind of desperate for a way to get her out of the house so she could still see the world (and get tired out) without messing with her knee at all. I first tried a forward-facing carrier, which I think would've been fantastic.



The problem was that the vet nixed the whole idea because he thought the up-and-down movement of me walking would cause Merlee's injured hind leg to move up and down a little bit and probably aggravate the knee :rolleyes:

So then I did a LOT of research on pet strollers and discovered a common problem is not enough window-lookout opportunity and they get top heavy and tip over pretty easily. That led me to this particular stroller that has great reviews, lots of window/screen space, and was one of the cheapest available at around $50 with shipping.



It works really well and the few times I used it with Merlee, she did fine and the stroller performed perfectly in our walks around the neighborhood. I don't think I used it enough to get my money's worth and am torn between trying to sell it on Craig's List and saving it in case some other opportunity for use comes along (hopefully NOT Merlee getting hurt again!). It would be equally good for a senior small dog that has arthritis issues or joint problems and still needs fresh air.
 

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I just don't know about pet strollers...for me it's a bit much. A dog can be adequately socialized after the puppy shots are given. I think sometimes people get a bit too nervous and hung up with the whole socialization time frame and fear missing out when in truth there is still plenty of time. A dog can be socialized at any point in it's life. Yes, it can be easier when younger, but a puppy is still very young after the 3 sets of shots. It's not like the window closes forever and socialization won't work after that.

A wagon or something of the sort would be good for a senior dog that can't get around anymore, but a stroller? Yet, I am happy to see that it works well for others. Like the saying goes, there's more than one way to skin the cat. :)
 

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I have two small puppies and they are halfway through their jab courses. Naturally they can't go on the ground outside either, but I manged to buy a puppy sling for about £6 on Amazon, there are some more expensive ones for bigger puppies but maybe that would be worth a look?

Sent from my D2303 using Tapatalk
 

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I have a pet stroller I bought for my two smaller dogs--one was in a car accident earlier this year and can't go on our long walks like she used to. The other is a young dog who can get nervous inside of stores and do the "freeze and skid" randomly when we're walking down the aisle. He loves going out, but is very small and is extremely intimidated on slippery flooring with strange dogs and people around. I use my stroller for both of them at different times and LOVE it. It doubles as a very portable crate as it closes in completely. I paid around $60 and definitely consider it worth the purchase.

While I understand people who think it's unreasonable, I don't believe dog strollers should be approached thinking of them as a baby stroller for a dog. In Florida it's far too hot many days for my dogs paws to be on the pavement. Since sidewalks are, by nature, pavement any time I want to take them into the city in Summer I use the stroller. For Victoria who has limited mobility it's a way she can come on our longer walks. If I'm going to a park that has a lot of larger offleash dogs I feel much more comfortable keeping Skipper, my little 14lb'er in the stroller while I scope out the situation. It's definitely a practicality. A cute practicality, but sensible nonetheless.
 
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