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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lately I've been seeing a lot of posts on my Facebook about various household items, plants, and situations that can be lethal for dogs. For example, today I saw one about asphalt causing third degree burns on paw pads, one about dogs getting caught in traps while out hiking, and another about foxtails and the plant's seed having the potential to cause severe medical issues and even death. Normally this doesn't phase me, but I've noticed that recently I have started to feel very anxious about these posts I've seen online.

I have walked through a field of foxtail with Nev, and I've caught myself worrying about her health because of it. She seems totally like herself, and yet I'm conjuring images of horrible abscesses in my head. And while walking a trail we've been on hundreds of times I kept imaging her getting her foot stuck in a trap. It's like these stupid posts are in the back of my mind now.

Have you noticed an influx of these types of posts/notices? Are they justifiable or a little over the top? How do they affect you?
 

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I have seen those. But to be fair I also see a myriad of paranoia posts about children, health, safety, etc. This society thrives on fear of stuff that is very unlikely to happen. It's ridiculous.
 

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I see them, I like to go on them and correct the incorrect information that they seem to love spreading, that's especially true about the ones on food that say things like do not feed raw eggs, do not feed raw meat, don't feed avocado, and don't feed any dairy products.

There are dangers out there but with just a little bit of common sense we can keep our pets safe. Like with the asphalt / concrete, if it's early enough in the day concrete, even if the sun's been shining the entire time on it, does not get hot enough here to bother Zody's paws (I've checked it multiple days in a row at increasing temps). Asphalt gets hotter faster and I worry about it earlier in the day. When I'm not sure I'll simply hold Zody back in the shade and check the asphalt / concrete.

I'd not worry about traps unless I know people have been trapping in the area.

When I lived in the country what I did worry about, after I got Zody, was hawks. We had some that lived in the area and I was always keeping an eye out for them if I had Zody out. He was at the top of the size range of what they considered prey.
 

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There are a lot of dangers out there and it seems like there's a new one popping up every day. The thing is we can't put our dogs in bubbles and stuff is going to happen. I would just try to be as educated as possible about what is dangerous and what is not and do your best.

Recently I posted a beautiful picture of one of my dogs swimming on facebook, she just learned how and one of my "friends" came along and posted a huge warning about toxic algae blooms. Sigh.. and yeah.. it did freak me out, but what can you do? The area we swam at is a pretty clean area and the dogs are still alive, thankfully. Now I know about it and will avoid letting them get into gross water.
 

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Honestly? if I were to worry about everything out there that could be bad for dogs - my dogs would never leave my house.

All you can do is take what you feel to be reasonable precautions. Otherwise you'll have some pretty neurotic dogs - which is also unhealthy.
 

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Honestly? if I were to worry about everything out there that could be bad for dogs - my dogs would never leave my house.

All you can do is take what you feel to be reasonable precautions. Otherwise you'll have some pretty neurotic dogs - which is also unhealthy.
Some facebook sites like to post things like this because they know people will share it.
 

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For the burns issue, before you walk on a surface with your dog on a hot day, hold the back of your hand against it for five seconds, if you can't do that, it is too hot for the dog.
For the poisonous plant issues and other outdoor hazards, unless you trust your dog not to eat/root around in stuff that they shouldn't use a leash. Also try to train them not to eat any plants or anything they find lying around.
As an example we had belladonna growing in our yard a while back, I cancelled all dog/kid play dates till it was totally gone, showed it to my own kids so they would know not to touch, and never let Jasmine in the yard unless I was watching. I am also working on a strong leave it for any vegetation at all.
Of course it is impossible to stay 100% safe all the time, for anyone canine or human, we can just minimize our risks as much as possible with common sense.
 

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I´ve recently seen a lot of warnings about burned paws from pavements and dogs dying in hot cars on facebook. With comments like ´I would brake the car window open if I saw a dog left in a car. Which wouldn´t be alarming except these people all live in ICEland. Literally the clue is in the name, Reykjavik is the most northernly capital in the world!

We also have one of the lowest crime rate in the world. Statisticly the dog is HIGHLY unlikely to come to harm while the car is stationary, its much MUCH more likely to be hurt while in a moving car in a car accident!!!

If you been working all day but still have to go and get grocery´s ect. Isn´t better to take the dog with you, leave him in the car for 30 mins while you shop and then take him to the park rather than leave him alone for another 60 mins??

There might definately be days in the summer where people need to be aware of the danger but honestly with the Icelandic summer that won´t be more than one or two days a year! we call it a heatwave when it goes up to 17 C (62 f) plus constant wind chill.

Also the pavement will not get hot enough in Iceland to cause 3 degree burns on paws!! They are more likely to burn their feet by accidentally trotting into water from natural hot springs (this has happened to animals and humans). Also we live in ICEland stop giving me information about burns and give me info on frostbite!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good points everyone. I too think a lot of the information you see posted on Facebook isn't accurate, or is scare tactics. And of course we can't protect our dogs from the world. Not only would that be exhausting but not very fun for the dogs!

I find I have become a little more paranoid after the passing of my Greyhound, Joe. He needed dental work done, and I was very nervous about how the surgery was going to go. My vet sat with me and walked me through the procedure, and reassured me that this was very routine for them and that there would be no issues. I said goodbye, and expected to pick him up the next morning. I ended up getting a call saying he had a heart attack during the procedure, due to not tolerating the anesthetic well. :( Although I'm not helicopter Mom crazy, I do find myself more leery than I used to be.
 

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I am slightly paranoid, but not to the extremes that some people go. I am constantly checking my dogs to make sure they are ok. Drives my husband nuts.
 
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Good points everyone. I too think a lot of the information you see posted on Facebook isn't accurate, or is scare tactics. And of course we can't protect our dogs from the world. Not only would that be exhausting but not very fun for the dogs!

I find I have become a little more paranoid after the passing of my Greyhound, Joe. He needed dental work done, and I was very nervous about how the surgery was going to go. My vet sat with me and walked me through the procedure, and reassured me that this was very routine for them and that there would be no issues. I said goodbye, and expected to pick him up the next morning. I ended up getting a call saying he had a heart attack during the procedure, due to not tolerating the anesthetic well. :( Although I'm not helicopter Mom crazy, I do find myself more leery than I used to be.
I'm so sorry that happened to Joe! I'd have been heartbroken and devastated beyond words :(

If you ever get a greyhound again get a vet that knows the breed well, they have special needs when it comes to anesthesia.

Greyhound Anesthesia Protocol - Greyhound Pets of America Minnesota
 
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