Dog Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I live in Southern California, where the temperature can soar above 100. Rickie is a 12 pound poodle/maltese. He is able to come into the garage. We always provide him food and water. We have a relatively big backyard (suburbs).
That being said, I know living outside is terrible for him. Dogs are meant to be part of a pack. And he is constantly bored or overexcited. I visit him several times a day to train him and to be with him.
I have been trying very hard to train him recently, but by nature outside dogs are harder to train. He will sit in the garage and backyard, but not anywhere else. He gets extremely excited(distracted) going anywhere else.
Before suggesting that I debate with my parents, please consider that they come from a country where child obedience is expected. They will not listen. I have tried. It has even been hard to spend my own money on him.
Their reasons are that they don't want the house value to go down and that he will dirty up or tear up the furniture.
I want him to be happy. I owe it to him. I love him. Please help me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I really don't understand why would anyone get a dog and then don't let it inside the house but i suppose that's none of my business. You could provide him with a kiddie pool to help him keep cool in hot weather. Always have cold water available. Try to find a place for him in your backyard with shade. You could give him ice cubes but be careful that he doesn't choke on them. You could also freeze treats like watermelon so he can lick it and cool off. Good luck and try once again to persuade your parents to let poor dog inside the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
Some dogs survive well living outside, however a maltepoo IMO is not one of them. They need human contact and a lot of it. I guess you could fix up the garage and spend more time with him there, but its not ideal. We too are in Southern California, and it does get hot during the summer and very cold in the winter. Spend as much time with him as you possibly can, he needs that human contact, and he must always have easy access to cool water, and relief from the heat now, and later from the cold. You have your work cut out for you.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,240 Posts
On top of the environmental issues the dog might face, doesn't California have a real Coyote problem? Maybe your dog would be better off with a family that does allow it in the house?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for your suggestions, I'll have to see what I can do about the kiddie pool and find ways to keep his water nice and cold. I mentioned that he can come into the garage, which is shady and cool (or at least cooler than it is outside). My primary concern is keeping him mentally stimulated through training and toys, etc. so that perhaps one day I can allow him to come inside. The problem that my parents have with him is that he's "crazy" and "uncontrollable" which is a direct result of them not really bothering to do much more than the bare physical minimums. I tried to persuade them yesterday, but my mom is an obsessive clean freak and she said I couldn't even do it for 5 minutes a day for training because "I'll never finish mopping".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I'm planning to have a table in the backyard where I can work and be around him passively. It's exhausting to have to go out everyday just to be with him, I mean, dogs are supposed to be around us all the time.
There are no coyotes where I am, but I know my parents wouldn't allow me to drop him at a rescue. On top of being neglectful, they are also quite possessive. My father has said more than once that the dog is the only one who loves him (ironic, considering he does not love the dog). They won't let him go.
To be honest, I don't know if I can either. I just want to give him the best life I can manage in this situation. I was blind to what was going on before, but now I'm trying to find ways to improve his situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I'm sorry your dog is in this situation. :(

It sounds like you need to do some serious training with him and work on his behavior and manners so your parents will let him inside, otherwise his behavior and his health, mental and physical, will continue to decline. It might also help if you can make friends with folks who have a well behaved indoor dog to show your parents that a dog inside doesn't necessarily guarantee destroyed furniture or decreased house value.

This seems like a situation where basic obedience training could make all the difference and show your parents that he can be calm and well behaved. Sit, down, stay and come would go a long way towards giving him a fighting chance at having a good life inside with his family.

If he's "crazy and uncontrollable" in the house, then working on teaching him 'settle' or 'relax' might also help. Any time he's lying down quietly, reward him. Let him know that's a desired behavior. There are plenty of positive reinforcement videos and websites that have instructions, but I'll drop this link here since I was just on that page, myself. I'll come back and post others as I come across them.

Also maybe work on teaching him to walk nicely on a leash that way you can introduce him to new environments outside the yard and teach him not to be excited and distracted in novel environments.

Don't be around him passively; work with him. Play with him. Teach him. He needs you to show him the proper way to act. :) Also, training doesn't have to be a formal "ok, this is training time, starting NOW" kind of thing. You can incorporate little training lessons into anything you do with him, including play.

Disclaimer: I have very little first hand experience with dog training, so take anything I say with a grain of salt. :eek: Hopefully folks who know more than I do will be around with more specific suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts
Try teaching him some "stupid pet tricks" like spin and shake. Those are a lot of fun to teach and to learn, and if he can learn some tricks, he might behave better in time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AlwaysTomboy

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I'm really glad that you're all here to help me out :) Tomboy, I just read through that article and it seems like that would really help, I'll definitely have to try it. I'm still in the process of teaching my dog to sit consistently (a long, slow process it is) and by now at least I know he's capable to learning something. I definitely have to buy a training leash to get him to stop being so wild on walks. By passively I meant I will start to move my desk work outside so I can just be around him, offer him pets, maybe squeeze in some training. It's a big improvement not only for him but also for me :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
I can share some of our experience with a poodle mix, ours is a bischon/poodle mix. Samantha is as much a house dog as a dog can be, I walk her every morning, then she is happy to hang out in the house the rest of the day, usually sharing a chair with me, or a couch with my wife. She definitely needs and demands the human contact with us. As far as tricks, although she is extremely smart, she is primarily a companion dog, which is how I would categorize most poodles and poodle mixes, so we really haven't taught her tricks. Dogs are adaptive, and if you can provide for his needs, he should be ok, but your situation is not ideal. As far as coyotes, I don't know where in Southern California you are, but even where we are in LA county, there are coyotes that come out of the hills looking for food and water. Don't be too sure there are none where you are, they are pretty pervasive and very sneaky. We have neighbors that have lost cats to the local coyotes, so I am pretty protective where Samantha is concerned, she is not even allowed on our fenced patio alone. Just a suggestion, but perhaps you could provide some articles for your parents to read, that detail how important that human connection is, to all dogs, but even more critical for some breeds, such as your Maltipoo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,800 Posts
If cleanliness is the main issue your parents have, would they let him inside if you gave him a bath/brush first or brought him to a groomer? Maltipoos should be relatively clean, low/no shedding dogs, but if he hasn't been groomed recently and lives outside, I can imagine his coat might be dirty and even matted. It might make a difference if they see him clean and well groomed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
I agree that making sure he is groomed, trimmed and clean might help you make your case with your parents. I can tell you, Samantha, similar breed to yours, (PoodleBischon mix) does not shed, we groom her every month, she is brushed daily and is always very clean and sharp looking, and her color is snow white. We live in a large townhouse, that my wife has decorated, and Samantha in over the seven years we have had her, has destroyed nothing inside, ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,900 Posts
If they won't listen to you, would they listen to a vet's suggestion that the dog should be indoors?

I'd definitely be concerned about coyotes. The heat is an issue too, even with plenty of water.

I live on a farm and have a cat that was mainly outside, but will move with me and be indoors in 2 weeks. He was always fine, but for some reason he got heatsick and dehydrated this year - even with ample water. My parents agreed it was a major issue and caved to let him live in the guest house, which is air conditioned, until he moves.

So, it's scary to me. I had no idea he'd get ill like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I'm so sorry for taking so long to reply! This week has been extremely hectic.
Training update: He's gotten quite good at sitting! At least in places with no distractions. I've begun the proofing process by moving from the garage to the backyard and there have been mixed results. I find that he ignores me sometimes for a piece of fruit lying on the ground or a toy. I think I've also been using too many treats. Treats are used for training, but they should be gradually weaned off or the dogs won't perform if there aren't treats around. I still can't find a good substitute for them though. I've also bought a sort of rope/belt leash so I can train him to walk nicely on a leash.
We do wash him once every couple weeks. Recently we shaved him so he doesn't look really dirty. I also used to groom him every couple days when he had a lot of hair. My mum just has a serious phobia for dirty things, she started yelling at me once for bringing a bucket into the house from the backyard. I doubt she'll ever let him in, especially since she and my dad have an "agreement" that he gets to keep the dog only if Rickie stays outside.
My dad has also been unhelpful. My mom has been willing enough to participate in training, but he refuses to acknowledge that his way is wrong (basically yelling at Rickie to get him to obey). My dad has a history of literally beating up Rickie for an hour whenever he chews something up. He doesn't do it anymore, but old thought patterns die hard.
They don't want to shell money on a vet either. Rickie has never had many health problems, so they don't see the point on going for visits. Rickie wasn't even licensed until last week, and only with a lot of complaining. My dad was going to refuse to pay for the license, even.
I don't know. Rickie has always been able to come into the garage, as I've already mentioned, and it is well ventilated and stays quite cool. Even on the hottest days. I'd describe the temperature there as mildly warm.
I'll definitely check out the training links, thank you.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top