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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Any advice for this?

I've been using re-direction, time outs, yelping, shoving away, a can of compressed air to startle her out of something I don't want her doing... pretty much everything I can think of. She just gets so focused on my limbs sometimes, especially when she's in a mood and I'm on the floor with her. She can be a total brat on her leash when we're out for walks too. Right out of the blue she'll start going at my legs, at which point I just stop and hold her still on as short a leash as possible (away from my legs) without choking her, but keeping her head still. When she calms down and is quiet for a minute or so she gets praised.... but then starts back up again when I say "let's go!" and start walking. I should be carrying that can of air with me at all times, but I also don't want to be over-using it and risk her becoming desensitized to the noise. Don't worry, I'm not spraying it at or ON her. I usually have it behind my back so she doesn't see where the noise comes from. I just use it to snap her out of whatever mental state she's in when verbal commands and treats aren't working.

It's not all bad, mind you. Obedience classes are going well. She CAN cuddle. She DOES know how to be gentle, but I guess it's that puppy exuberance that makes her cantankerous. Woooo, puppies....

I hope I'm doing the right thing. O_O
 

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How long have you been trying the redirection for? Often people get frustrated and stop too soon, I use this method with herding dogs, breeds who are well known for nipping. You just need to keep at it and changing methods all the time won't be helping.

Stick with redirecting, using the compressed air isn't teaching her not to bite it's just scaring her into not doing it, methods like that come with possible consequences eg her becoming frightened of you because of the noise.

Use the 3 step method, keep a toy with you at all times. If she begins to mouth then stick a toy in her mouth and begin playing tug, if she continues then leave the room, come back if she continues then you can put her in her crate/xpen with a chew to cool down and repeat. Every. Single. Time. She will soon learn that her mouthing or nipping = end of fun.

Make sure you are walking around slowly, moving fast could rile her up. Look up Kikopup on YouTube, practice self control exercises things that will help control her nipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
How long have you been trying the redirection for? Often people get frustrated and stop too soon, I use this method with herding dogs, breeds who are well known for nipping. You just need to keep at it and changing methods all the time won't be helping.

Stick with redirecting, using the compressed air isn't teaching her not to bite it's just scaring her into not doing it, methods like that come with possible consequences eg her becoming frightened of you because of the noise.

Use the 3 step method, keep a toy with you at all times. If she begins to mouth then stick a toy in her mouth and begin playing tug, if she continues then leave the room, come back if she continues then you can put her in her crate/xpen with a chew to cool down and repeat. Every. Single. Time. She will soon learn that her mouthing or nipping = end of fun.

Make sure you are walking around slowly, moving fast could rile her up. Look up Kikopup on YouTube, practice self control exercises things that will help control her nipping.
Cool. Thanks for the advice. Haven't been using the air long anyhow, so good to know. I feel like a right git.

Trying to re-direct her with a toy and eventually resorting to a time-out has been going on for just over a month. Heh. I guess just staying persistent is all and she'll eventually get it more consistently.

As for our walks, man, if I walked any slower I'd be standing still. LOL! She's okay a lot of the time and then, just out of the blue, I nearly get knocked off of my feet, which freaks me out because I end up stepping on HER. She was doing so well after I couldn't get her walking at all for a solid month. Often times I'll just sit on a bench and ignore her until she's done. If there's a stick near by, I'll try engaging her with that. I'll have to carry around one of her small toys from now on...

I'll definitely look at more of Kikopup's videos.
 

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I have this problem to, except my dog is no longer a puppy. The only thing that has been working for him is time-outs and praising good behavior. I am hoping that it will continue to work because his teeth even when used playfully leave bruises.
 
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