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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 4 yo bulldog that gets very aggressive in the morning when my husband leaves for work. We all sleep in the bedroom with the door closed. The alarm sounds and my husband gets up and leaves the room. I stay in bed and Arthur the bulldog is in his dog bed. My husband used to like to come back in the room before he left for work to say goodbye. Now if he comes in Arthur starts jumping, spinning in circles, snarling, barking and will nip us if we go near him. My husband gets very angry and starts yelling which makes Arthur even more wild. Even if he says goodbye from the other side of the closed door Arthur goes crazy. As soon as my husband leaves Arthur is calm again. When he comes home at night Arthur is glad to see him and they spend most evenings hanging out together. When I leave the house he never acts that way. This has been going on for quite a few months and I don't know how to fix it. Thanks for any suggestions you may have.
 

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This is likely resource-guarding of you and your bed while you are sleeping and from experience I can say that it is fairly tricky to deal with, only because who wants to train their dog first thing when they wake up?! There's an easy way and a hard way.

EASY WAY: The dog stops sleeping in your room.

HARD WAY: During the daytime, start counter-conditioning your dog by hopping into bed, getting him settled into his bed and have your husband walk into the room (just in the door), toss a few really good treats to the dog, and walk back out. Do this until you notice the dog getting excited (happy excited, not upset excited) to see your husband in the doorway. When this happens, you can have your husband move a little closer, and toss the treats. When the dog is cool with this, have him move a little closer, and repeat the process until your husband can get all the way up to the bed.

NOW... Time to take your mock-up to the real-life situation. In the morning, start from the very top, with your husband popping in the door and tossing some treats. Your dog should be somewhat okay with this because the only thing new to him this point is the time at which everything is happening. Same thing: Day by day, you can have your husband move a little closer when the dog seems ready, ie, when he lifts his head and goes "Oh good, it's dad!" not, "INTRUDER ALERT! GET HIM!!!"
 
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