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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a three-month old puppy. She is supposed to be a mixed breed. The mother is dachshund-toy poodle-Japanese spitz. The father is a Norwegian buhund.

We wanted a mixed breed dog. Our purebred dachshund has had a lot of health problems. Now we have some questions.

1. Is our puppy really a mixed breed? How can we tell?

2. Why would someone sell a puppy as a mixed breed if they're not?

Here is the first reason why I'm doubting our puppy is a mixed breed: she looks and acts 100% Norwegian buhund. We can't see a single trace of any of the mother's breeds in our puppy. Is this possible? We love our puppy no matter what, but we had assumed we brought home a mixed breed, as were our wishes.

We live in Norway, where buhunds have been around for hundreds of years.

We'd never seen a buhund puppy before. Has anyone else had a mixed breed dog who clearly resembled only one of the four breeds? Here are some photos of our puppy, looking as much like a buhund puppy as possible, with no visible traits of dachshund or toy poodle, but possibly the traits of a Japanese spitz. (We didn't know what buhund puppies looked like or their temperament and characteristics until after we brought her home.)








With our dachshund:

 

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She's adorable! Something to keep in mind- Spitz is a breed and also a type (Norwegian Elkhounds, Siberian Huskies, Samoyeds, Shiba Inus are all spitz types), so with Mom being 1/3 Japanese Spitz, and Dad being a Buhund, the majority of her breed make up is spitz type, so her looking like a Buhund isn't surprising (Buhunds are a spitz type).
 

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Where did you get the dog? Was there something other than the dog's looks that leads you to believe the person who sold the pup lied? If you really want to check you can get a dog DNA test.
 

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Mixed breed dogs can look like either parent. My previous dog was a German Shepherd Dog and Golden Retriever mix. He looked like a mix of both, but others in his litter were pure Golden, others were indistinguishable from GSDs. Genetics can be funny like that.
 

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As a warning, not all mutts have better health than purebreds. If the parents were genetically sound the puppy will have a better chance at being healthy, be they mutt parents or pedigree. If the mongrel parents were riddled with problems the pup's likely to be as bad off, even if it's got four-five different breeds in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses!

Yes, a buhund is a type of spitz, something we learned during our research.

Yes, mixed breeds can have health problems, too. We know that, but we also thought the chances of having purebred-related health problems would be fewer with a mixed breed. Our dachshund, for example, has a skin problem that is typical with dachshunds and German shepherds. Unfortunately, buhunds have problems within their breed as well, such as cataracts.

I have found an online site which does DNA testing on dogs, but I'm not sure if they're reputable. Whether she is a purebred or a mutt, we love her and plan to keep her. I just never realized that a mutt could look so much like a purebred, and even have the characteristics of the breed. For example, she is a natural shepherd and she is showing signs of wanting to jump hurdles--the things we would never expect to see in our dachshund.
 

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I have found an online site which does DNA testing on dogs, but I'm not sure if they're reputable. Whether she is a purebred or a mutt, we love her and plan to keep her. I just never realized that a mutt could look so much like a purebred, and even have the characteristics of the breed. For example, she is a natural shepherd and she is showing signs of wanting to jump hurdles--the things we would never expect to see in our dachshund.
I think the DNA test is a good idea. They can be wrong, but they are overall more accurate than guesses made by vets/shelter workers. What company are you considering? I had one done by Wisdom Panel, and I had NO idea what breeds my dog might be, but they came back with at least one possibility that made sense.
 

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Thanks for the responses!

Yes, a buhund is a type of spitz, something we learned during our research.

Yes, mixed breeds can have health problems, too. We know that, but we also thought the chances of having purebred-related health problems would be fewer with a mixed breed. Our dachshund, for example, has a skin problem that is typical with dachshunds and German shepherds. Unfortunately, buhunds have problems within their breed as well, such as cataracts.

I have found an online site which does DNA testing on dogs, but I'm not sure if they're reputable. Whether she is a purebred or a mutt, we love her and plan to keep her. I just never realized that a mutt could look so much like a purebred, and even have the characteristics of the breed. For example, she is a natural shepherd and she is showing signs of wanting to jump hurdles--the things we would never expect to see in our dachshund.
My current dog looks like a half sized Golden Retriever (you can see him in my avatar), but has no interest in retrieving. He's also not at all biddable, and not particularly intelligent. He bays like a beagle, is obsessed with scents, is extremely prey-driven and just generally acts like a purebred beagle.

Mixed breeds are amazing that way, they can look like one breed and act like a totally different breed. It's why I adopt, because it's just too fun to have a unique dog, but I would never pay for that. The vast majority of mixed breed breeders are highly unethical.
 

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No one will ever ever ever sell a purebreed as a mixed breed

no one ever does that. Ever heard of someone selling a real diamond as a fake?
Unless you walk into a shop looking for a mixed breed and they have none. Thus selling you a pure breed as a fake and charging less??
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The puppy came from a farmer's dog (as in a farmer, one who has cows and tractors and such). Yes, I was looking at wisdom panel for the dna test. Not because I care about pedigree, but because I'm so curious and things like genetics interest me. I've even considered doing the national geographic human dna test, just to find out where my ancestors came from. Like I said earlier, she has every trait from a buhund, not only in looks but in personality and physical ability. Japanese spitz, maybe, but even her coloring and fur patterns are buhund.
 

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It is possible you'll end up with a dog who has a skin condition and cataracts. Mixing dogs together doesn't negate their genetic flaws. Better off going for a more reputable breeder rather than a farmer.
 

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I sorta doubt it. I agree he doesn't look much like the other breeds. But as somebody pointed out, he IS mostly spitz type, so it's not shocking he LOOKS mostly like a spitz. I doubt the farmer had any reason to lie to you.
 

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We wanted a mixed breed dog. Our purebred dachshund has had a lot of health problems. Now we have some questions.
I am reading this as you deliberately sought out a mixed breed with the expectation it would be healthier. That is incorrect.

A dog from two healthy parents will generally produce a healthy dog. A dog from two parents with many health issues will often produce a sickly puppy. The fact that the parents with health issues are of different breeds doesn't help.

In a few specific health issues, issues caused by a single gene, with full dominance or full recessiveness, crossing a dog of breed A with the bad gene to a dog of breed B known to not have that bad gene will produce a pup that has at least 1 good copy of the gene. However, one generation down the road, you can potentially be right back to having the bad gene pop up again.

What's worse, a lot of more generalized health issues (proper bone structure, strength of immune system, etc) are controlled by hundreds of genes, so by mixing two purebred breeds you could in theory just collect even more bad genes into a single dog vs 'reverse' the trend and get a dog that is healthier.

Finally, a big reason mutts used to be cited as healthier is because of natural selection and human selection. When the stray dog had a litter of pups, only the healthy ones survived. When the working class family bought a pup, they expected it to grow into a good family dog, good working dog, good guard dog, etc. If it didn't because it had health problems, it didn't get kept. Compare this to a purebred show line where even if a dog had a known health problem if it was winning in the show ring, it would be kept and allowed to make puppies.

In the end you have to accept the dog you do have regardless of it being a purebred or a mix. And forget about looking for mixes just because you think they'll be healthier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Four breeds, not two.

1/6 Japanese spitz, not half.

I'm not really into the debating going on here. It's really not productive, since we have the puppy, love the puppy, and have no plans to go out and get another puppy. I simply asked if it's possible for a dog who is from four breeds to heavily favor only one of the breeds. Now that I've sifted through the comments for the few lines that answered my actual question, I don't need to know more.
 

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What 'debate'?

Nobody's telling you to get rid of the puppy. Nobody's hinted at telling you to get rid of it and certainly haven't told you to get another puppy.

You specified you wanted to avoid the problems your pure daschund has and thus got a mutt.

All people have done is warn you that if the parents aren't healthy dogs, no amount of mutt in there will help, and prepare for possible eventual problems. And since you've never said anything about the health of the parents, maybe you don't know their health.

There is no debate. I hope your pup's parents are healthy, given your goal. If not, keep an eye out for the problems they suffer already.
 
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