Dog Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all
We're in obedience classes and I hope you don't mind if I keep you updated while we complete them?

Afterwards, we plan on the canine good citizen test (I'm a volunteer pet therapist, and for Mikey to do the program he needs that first) and then hopefully agility or flyball or something! We don't want to compete-just keep him happy, exercised and engaged.

Our first lesson was in the park one-on-one because we could not make the class. (It was actually two in one, we couldn't make the first two)-so we learned sit from the side and front, down from the side and front and heel. Mikey did wonderful-he's such a pleaser. He did not know anything when we got him but he really seems to want to learn things!

Our very first 'in class' lesson was Sunday. Mikey was a little anxious (he's a bit of an anxious dog, given his past-understandable) but he did wonderful and this class we worked on recall and stay-which he did great at-recall was the first thing we 'taught' him ourselves at home so he's ahead of the class so far!

Next Sunday, before the class the instructor is having a bbq in the dog park for us to come to and doing a FREE introduction to tracking and a free introduction to agility! I'm so pumped for it, I think he'll love it! Can't wait :) :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
nice !! tracking is fun hehehe i just started working with noel on the agility but for sum reason she gets half way through the tunnel and lays down for a nap. i cant wait to hear more on your classes and how he is doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,635 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Hey Mikey, just wondering where you are doing the training through. Sounds like a cool training class. Would be intersted in checking it out. Is that just a basic training course or a puppy course?

Thanx
Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hi Mickey (LOL Our names are too similar -this is going to get confusing :p)

It's just basic obedience, she does puppy courses too but Mikey is two so I asked her where we should start and this is it! There are some younger dogs in the class, but some older ones too.

We're doing it though Welcome to packleaderfitness.com

I think she's just local but what I did to find the course/trainer I wanted was spent time online looking at EVERY place in my city that offered obedience.

I looked at reviews and talked to people in the dog park (one course looked good but my friends mother went to it and the lady advocated pinching and hitting the dogs!!)

Basically I chose the course on that her philosophy and methods best matched mine-what I expected and how I wanted my dog treated. Many people train in different ways and I just picked a close fit. So far she and the course seem great! I also chose this over a trainer who comes to your home because I want Mikey exposed to new people/places/dogs as much as possible :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
So we had our intro to agility and tracking today at the park and Mikey had so much fun!

She had a whole agility course set up-small equipment b/c it was intro. She walked us through how to get them to do each obstacle, what they were called and what signals/commands to give. By the end of it-Mikey had the best time and could even do it off leash!! I'm one proud mamma :)

Then the tracking. It was very neat and he seemed good at that too! She had a volunteer make a 'disturbance' by wiping their feet in the dirt, then walk off and hide in the bushes (setting them up for success-so we knew where the lost person was hiding) -then we took each dog up to the spot and said 'SEARCH' and then follow the path to the 'lost child' -if they went off track we were to say 'Phoooey' and put them back on track. It was great for Mikey because the volunteer was two little girls-(He LOVES kids) so finding them was a very high value reward. He did wonderful and really seemed to get it for the second search-we're definitely going to do her 'dog sport' class coming up in November-where you do agilty, freestyle, tracking etc. :) He really enjoyed himself, and we did too.

He was tuckered out for class tonight even though we put him down for a nap-we did silent hand signals (no verbal command) and commands at a 15ft distance on a long line. He's doing good :) I'm so happy with this trainer and the classes-will keep you posted after next week's class :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,635 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Ahhh I missed a class update!

We gradutated this past Sunday. Our teacher brougth grad caps and we took lots of pictures (I haven't uploaded yet!) and she brought "Champagne-well Gingerale...it's the champagne of gingerales!" to celebrate :) LOL

She is away for a month and gets back in November-then we're going to be taking her Dog Sport class :)

(from her site) "
Looking for some indoor activities to do with your dog during the winter? This newly added class is a variety of activities at the beginner level to keep your dog mentally stimulated when outdoor activities are impractical. This class incorporates elements of agility, rally-o, scent detection, tricks, freestyle and any other fun indoor activity you'd like to try! "

Sounds like fun :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Paparazzi strikes again-here's the pics! (I need a new camera!!)




Playing musical 'chairs' after the test








Grad cap





The whole graduating class (Mikey's collegues really ;) )

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Just an intro to sports-we are not interested in showing unless it's like 'house league' fun stuff; so we are simply trying to teach him many fun things to do to keep him physically and mentally stimulated ;) And we'd like to do a bit more obedience.

The class is just an intro-four sessions-and then she is setting up courses in each based on interest-so we'll likely continue with her. We have some agility stuff in the yard already and Mikey loves it

"This class incorporates elements of agility, rally-o, scent detection, tricks, freestyle and any other fun indoor activity you'd like to try! " <<Course description.

He will be doing his 'canine good citizen test' very soon as he needs this to do the pet therapy course with me (and then he'll come with me to work to go visit the residents. They really respond to animals and I like bringing mine into visit.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
hes going to get his CGC!!! thats awesome...I need to get Emmas done.
Well....hopefully!! It involves heeling with no lead, and he's not too consistent on that... :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,782 Posts
Well....hopefully!! It involves heeling with no lead, and he's not too consistent on that... :)

are the requirements different in canada?:confused:

We don't have to do that to pass here...just loose leash walk.:p


Test 4: Out for a walk (walking on a loose lead)
This test demonstrates that the handler is in control of the dog. The dog may be on either side of the handler. The dog's position should leave no doubt that the dog is attentive to the handler and is responding to the handler's movements and changes of direction. The dog need not be perfectly aligned with the handler and need not sit when the handler stops. The evaluator may use a pre-plotted course or may direct the handler/dog team by issuing instructions or commands. In either case, there should be a right turn, left turn, and an about turn with at least one stop in between and another at the end. The handler may talk to the dog along the way, praise the dog, or give commands in a normal tone of voice. The handler may sit the dog at the halts if desired.




Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,579 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I think so...Dangit nope I was wrong-I read it somewhere but right on the site, it's all on a lead :)

"
Test 1: Accepting a friendly stranger
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to approach it and speak to the handler in a natural, everyday situation. The evaluator walks up to the dog and handler and greets the handler in a friendly manner, ignoring the dog. The evaluator and handler shake hands and exchange pleasantries. The dog must show no sign of resentment or shyness, and must not break position or try to go to the evaluator.


Test 2: Sitting politely for petting
This test demonstrates that the dog will allow a friendly stranger to touch it while it is out with its handler. With the dog sitting at the handler's side, to begin the exercise, the evaluator pets the dog on the head and body. The handler may talk to his or her dog throughout the exercise. The dog may stand in place as it is petted. The dog must not show shyness or resentment.


Test 3: Appearance and grooming
This practical test demonstrates that the dog will welcome being groomed and examined and will permit someone, such as a veterinarian, groomer or friend of the owner, to do so. It also demonstrates the owner's care, concern and sense of responsibility. The evaluator inspects the dog to determine if it is clean and groomed. The dog must appear to be in healthy condition (i.e., proper weight, clean, healthy and alert). The handler should supply the comb or brush commonly used on the dog. The evaluator then softly combs or brushes the dog, and in a natural manner, lightly examines the ears and gently picks up each front foot. It is not necessary for the dog to hold a specific position during the examination, and the handler may talk to the dog, praise it and give encouragement throughout.


Test 4: Out for a walk (walking on a loose lead)
This test demonstrates that the handler is in control of the dog. The dog may be on either side of the handler. The dog's position should leave no doubt that the dog is attentive to the handler and is responding to the handler's movements and changes of direction. The dog need not be perfectly aligned with the handler and need not sit when the handler stops. The evaluator may use a pre-plotted course or may direct the handler/dog team by issuing instructions or commands. In either case, there should be a right turn, left turn, and an about turn with at least one stop in between and another at the end. The handler may talk to the dog along the way, praise the dog, or give commands in a normal tone of voice. The handler may sit the dog at the halts if desired.


Test 5: Walking through a crowd
This test demonstrates that the dog can move about politely in pedestrian traffic and is under control in public places. The dog and handler walk around and pass close to several people (at least three). The dog may show some interest in the strangers but should continue to walk with the handler, without evidence of over-exuberance, shyness or resentment. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise the dog throughout the test. The dog should not jump on people in the crowd or strain on the leash.


Test 6: Sit and down on command and Staying in place
This test demonstrates that the dog has training, will respond to the handler's commands to sit and down and will remain in the place commanded by the handler (sit or down position, whichever the handler prefers). The dog must do sit AND down on command, then the owner chooses the position for leaving the dog in the stay. Prior to this test, the dog's leash is replaced with a line 20 feet long. The handler may take a reasonable amount of time and use more than one command to get the dog to sit and then down. The evaluator must determine if the dog has responded to the handler's commands. The handler may not force the dog into position but may touch the dog to offer gentle guidance. When instructed by the evaluator, the handler tells the dog to stay and walks forward the length of the line, turns and returns to the dog at a natural pace. The dog must remain in the place in which it was left (it may change position) until the evaluator instructs the handler to release the dog. The dog may be released from the front or the side.


Test 7: Coming when called
This test demonstrates that the dog will come when called by the handler. The handler will walk 10 feet from the dog, turn to face the dog, and call the dog. The handler may use encouragement to get the dog to come. Handlers may choose to tell dogs to "stay" or "wait" or they may simply walk away, giving no instructions to the dog.


Test 8: Reaction to another dog
This test demonstrates that the dog can behave politely around other dogs. Two handlers and their dogs approach each other from a distance of about 20 feet, stop, shake hands and exchange pleasantries, and continue on for about 10 feet. The dogs should show no more than casual interest in each other. Neither dog should go to the other dog or its handler.


Test 9: Reaction to distraction
This test demonstrates that the dog is confident at all times when faced with common distracting situations. The evaluator will select and present two distractions. Examples of distractions include dropping a chair, rolling a crate dolly past the dog, having a jogger run in front of the dog, or dropping a crutch or cane. The dog may express natural interest and curiosity and/or may appear slightly startled but should not panic, try to run away, show aggressiveness, or bark. The handler may talk to the dog and encourage or praise it throughout the exercise.


Test 10: Supervised separation
This test demonstrates that a dog can be left with a trusted person, if necessary, and will maintain training and good manners. Evaluators are encouraged to say something like, "Would you like me to watch your dog?" and then take hold of the dog's leash. The owner will go out of sight for three minutes. The dog does not have to stay in position but should not continually bark, whine, or pace unnecessarily, or show anything stronger than mild agitation or nervousness. Evaluators may talk to the dog but should not engage in excessive talking, petting, or management attempts (e.g, "there, there, it's alright").


Equipment
All tests must be performed on leash. Dogs should wear well-fitting buckle or slip collars made of leather, fabric, or chain. Special training collars such as pinch collars, head halters, etc. are not permitted in the CGC test. We recognize that special training collars may be very useful tools for beginning dog trainers, however, we feel that dogs are ready to take the CGC test at the point at which they are transitioned to regular collars.
The evaluator supplies a 20-foot lead for the test. The owner/handler should bring the dog's brush or comb to the test.
Encouragement
Owners/handlers may use praise and encouragement throughout the test. The owner may pet the dog between exercises. Food and treats are not permitted during testing, nor is the use of toys, squeaky toys, etc. to get the dog to do something. We recognize that food and toys may provide valuable reinforcement or encouragement during the training process but these items should not be used during the test.
Failures – Dismissals
Any dog that eliminates during testing must be marked failed. The only exception to this rule is that elimination is allowable in test Item 10, but only when test Item 10 is held outdoors.
Any dog that growls, snaps, bites, attacks, or attempts to attack a person or another dog is not a good citizen and must be dismissed from the test."
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top