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We have a 9 1/2 yr. redtick coonhound rescue. He has awful skin issues. Constantly itching, hair loss, skin crawling when you touch certain areas on his back. He also is always licking himself which has made his skin so red and even more irritated. The scratching becomes problematic and has at times caused him to bleed. When I look at his skin under his coat, it’s all flaky and red. In some areas it looks as though the skin is becoming darker around his snout and one ear.
I’ve been told coonhounds are a stinky breed but WOWzers! He smells like a Cheeto! No matter how often he’s bathed. He stinks right after, and continues to itch. We’ve also tried Skin so soft oil, coconut oil, and oral fish oils.
I tried Everything I can think of! He’s been on prescription allergies medicine from the vet. Also a prescribed shampoo and ear drops. Nothing has helped. The shampoo from the vet seemed to irritate his skin even more. He starts to whimper and want outside immediately.
This is definitely not related to ants or any other type of insect. He’s an indoor dog and I’ve never seen a single bug/ant on him or any of our other pets. Plus the skin issues are year round. At first we thought it was a yeast allergy. So changed his food out multiple times. No grain, as well as some of the most expensive stuff on the market.
Even after all the multiple trips to the vet. We are still at a loss and can’t find anything that works. I just hate seeing him so miserable😔He’s the sweetest buddy I could ever ask for❤
So I just had to reach out and see if anyone else has a pet with these issues and if so, have you found something that works?? We’re a bit desperate. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!!
thanks
Jen
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This is the medication our vet prescribed. The instructions on the bottle:
Apoquel 16mg
-give 1/2 tablet TWICE a day for 2weeks then 1/2 tablet once a day
 

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Apoquel is to relieve itching, but iirc doesn't treat the root cause.

What are you feeding, can you link the ingredients?
 

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I am currently dealing (struggling) with, and have been for quite some time, similar issues with my lab mix and can certainly understand how you feel!
Just a suggestion, but if the Apoquel is not working as well as you hoped perhaps consider Cytopoint injection. My dog has had it twice, eases the symptoms by about 95%, for about 8 weeks (for him) before seeing a slow increase in symptoms.

Like you I have tried multiple things, he didn't tolerate the medicated shampoo from the vet very well either, but I did find that an oatmeal based shampoo for dogs with sensitive skin did provide some (temporary) relief from the itching (and was easier on him) and a spray made by Skout's Honor - Probiotic Hot Spot Hydrogel worked well to help heal his 'hot spots' and self inflicted injuries from scratching and chewing on himself.

It has a been a journey of trial and error - kind of feels like groping in the dark searching for some mystery item - but my vet's first suggestion, as well as giving him the Cytopoint injection, was to put him on a limited ingredient food with a new to him single protein (she suggested fish) and carbohydrate source, for a period of 8-12 weeks (he was to have nothing but that food), recommended that I continue with the fish oil supplement that I had been giving him for almost a year - prior to the onset of his problems. While I have seen some improvement (no more sores (hot spots), ears are cleaner) since having him on the limited ingredient diet (First Mate) and have had to trial a few proteins, I have recently decided to try removing anything fish from his diet since it the one thing that he has been getting consistently this whole time. I stopped the fish oil about a month ago and saw some reduction in the itching, and am in the process of transitioning him to a fish free dog food, in hopes that we are on the 'right path' this time.

While it is rare for dogs to respond negatively to fish protein or fish oil, it can happen. I did see some improvement after stopping the fish oil, so decided to go the next step and see if eliminating fish altogether from his diet will meet with more success - which is where I am now and am seeing a slow improvement. Thinking back (hindsight is 20/20) all the foods I have fed him had fish or fish oil in them, usually way down on the ingredient list, so it is possible he developed, over time, a sensitivity to it.
A lesson learned, if one is going to do a food 'elimination trial' - consider eliminating any supplements that one may be giving as well (if possible) so that the ONLY food the dog is getting is the new food.

I wish I could share a success story, but it is a journey that takes time to work through, I hope you can find some relief for your pup soon!
 

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I agree with the cytopoint. It can be quit pricey for a large breed dog. Did your vet treat for the skin infection with antibiotics as well? Skin problems are two fold. Another thing to think about is if your dog sleeps on a dog bed. The vet I work for had a doberman who was allergic to the cotton in his bed.
 

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I agree with the cytopoint. It can be quit pricey for a large breed dog. Did your vet treat for the skin infection with antibiotics as well? Skin problems are two fold. Another thing to think about is if your dog sleeps on a dog bed. The vet I work for had a doberman who was allergic to the cotton in his bed.
Agree, Cytopoint is pricey, (not sure how it compares with Apoquel per month) but for me it seemed like a safer choice, and was definitely worth it and is intended to manage the symptoms, provide him with some relief from the relentless itching while I worked to try to resolve his issues.

No, he was not put on antibiotics, he was bathed weekly (per my vet), and in combination with the Cytopoint injection, his hot spots healed quickly and he hasn't had any since.
 

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Agree, Cytopoint is pricey, (not sure how it compares with Apoquel per month) but for me it seemed like a safer choice, and was definitely worth it and is intended to manage the symptoms, provide him with some relief from the relentless itching while I worked to try to resolve his issues.

No, he was not put on antibiotics, he was bathed weekly (per my vet), and in combination with the Cytopoint injection, his hot spots healed quickly and he hasn't had any since.
If it is a deep pyoderma my vet always puts them on antibiotics for the secondary infection. I have seen Doc grow hair on naked, elephant skinned dogs. He normally treats with medications for both bacterial and fungal infections Plus the weekly bathing with medicated shampoo. If the skin is bad enough he gives the cytopoint injection and starts the apoquel at the same time. That way when the effects of the cytopoint start to wane the apoquel takes over. Eventually they go to the lowest possible effective dose on the Apoquel. Apoquel is safer than using pred. But in extreme cases sometimes pred is the only thing that will get the itching and inflammation in check.
 

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If it is a deep pyoderma my vet always puts them on antibiotics for the secondary infection. I have seen Doc grow hair on naked, elephant skinned dogs. He normally treats with medications for both bacterial and fungal infections Plus the weekly bathing with medicated shampoo. If the skin is bad enough he gives the cytopoint injection and starts the apoquel at the same time. That way when the effects of the cytopoint start to wane the apoquel takes over. Eventually they go to the lowest possible effective dose on the Apoquel. Apoquel is safer than using pred. But in extreme cases sometimes pred is the only thing that will get the itching and inflammation in check.
My goal, my hope, is to determine the underlying reason for the itching not just manage the symptoms with medications that can potentially have negative side effects of their own. His condition has improved immensely from where he was a few months ago, so I have to assume that the treatments offered by my vet are appropriate and are working for him.
 

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My goal, my hope, is to determine the underlying reason for the itching not just manage the symptoms with medications that can potentially have negative side effects of their own. His condition has improved immensely from where he was a few months ago, so I have to assume that the treatments offered by my vet are appropriate and are working for him.
That is great news!! Allergies are so difficult to manage. We had a cat who use to come in all the time. Poor little girl lived most of her life in an cone because of her severe allergies. Many of the medications that are available today were not when she was being treated. Plus there are less medications available for kitties. Her owners managed her the best they could with diet and meds. They loved her dearly and took great care of her. Finally at the age of 12 they released her from her suffering. It was a very sad day for everyone. I still miss seeing her.
 
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