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why is he holding me like this?...i thought he wanted his space
I think there may be a misunderstanding somewhere.

When we say "he's guarding the space" we don't mean personal space, we mean he's guarding the exact spot he's in - his spot on the bed (or the whole bed), the couch, the perfect sunbathing spot, etc. So cuddling you doesn't mean he's decided he's OK with being touched - or, more correctly, that he doesn't mind d touching you - but don't be trying to push him off that spot.

And yes, it's entirely normal for a dog to want to be with their human. But he might want it on his terms.
 

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Neutering him might help (might) with the humping, but it won't help with the severe aggression. You need a full vet check (brain scan would be good, I'm rather baffled that you can afford a brain scan, but not a behaviourist? Surely the scan would cost more?) and a qualified reputable behaviourist (I vehemently disagree with @Madra Anamchara 's suggestion that you attempt to control him alone - that is dangerous advice that could see him go for your face next time). You need someone who can see with their own eyes what's happening on the ground. If you cannot afford that then you only have one option - I know it'll break your heart - it would break mine, too, but euthanasia would be the only other option. It would be irresponsible of us to suggest anything else. You cannot manage this on your own. We can't see what's going on, like a behaviourist can.
You know, LMMB, you're right. I shouldn't even have suggested that the OP could attempt to train the dog on their own.
I take it back. It was a stupid thing for me to say.
My intention was to lay out all of the possible options, but that should not have been one of them.
Thanks for calling me out on that.
 

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This has been a busy thread.

Sorry if someone already brought this up. In looking at medical.causes, do get a full bloodwork panel. When you take him in to be neutered is a good time.You'd be definitely looking at broad spectrum/full workup and on the thyroid levels, make sure they examine T4 levels. Hypothyroidism is one of the top medical reasons for aggression, as is hypoglycemia, brain inflammation, and etc. If it's a virus caused brain inflammation, for example, there might be a higher white blood cell count.
 

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Shadowfox, that is great advice. Thank you.

To @ilovemydogs2345, it's time for you get professional guidance, both from a vet and from a qualified behaviorist.

I would like to remind everyone of our policy at the Dog Forum regarding giving advice in situations like this one.

If your dog’s behavior has escalated to the point of biting and drawing blood, the internet is not where you should be.It is the responsibility of the dog owner to prevent bites from happening and should your dog bite someone else you could be held civilly ($) and criminally (jail) responsible, and your dog may be euthanized. It is for the seriousness surrounding dog bites that we, The Dog Forum Team, will again make a judgment call and may close/remove/edit a thread once your dog has bitten someone, even yourself. Home interventions may have worked before the bite, but it is the general consensus that you find a professional trainer and/or behaviorist to help you solve the problem-BEFORE someone gets seriously hurt.

To locate a behaviorist/trainer, please visit.

Int. Assoc. of Animal Behavior Consultants

American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior

American College of Veterinary Behaviorists

The Certified Council of Pet Dog Trainers

Pet Professional Guild

I am now going to close this thread. @ilovemydogs2345, I wish you and your dog well. You have gotten a lot of good advice here, but you need to enlist professional help. This situation is clearly beyond the scope of an Internet message board.
 
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