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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, fellow doggo lovers. I joined this forum today, hoping I could provide advice. I have two dogs, A three-year-old purebred chihuahua, Ollie (I mostly refer to him as Tiny dog.) And a seven-year-old German shorthaired lab named coco.

Tinydog
Tinydog is the main reason I joined this forum, seeking advice, and also giving it out. I have studied dog behavior for close to 6 months now, and I want to help other people, anyway, back to Tinydog. Tinydog is a lazy dog, lazy, and very naughty. I have tried every way possible to housebreak him but it doesn't work!


Coco is a more mellow dog nowadays, he is still playful, but not as much as he used to be because he is an old dog. He is housebroken (thank the lord) He has never bitten anyone, well come to think of it, he play bites, but it doesn't hurt. He is a gentle giant. :)
 

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I sometimes find it helps to 'frame' problems differently. For example, rather than thinking Tinydog as ”naughty”, I'd wonder why he is doing what he is doing, or why he is not complying with what you expect.

I think there are three main reasons why a dog doesn't comply with what we ask.

First, he doesn't understand. That's where training comes in, you need to teach him what you want, and reward when he gets it right so he knows he has done the right thing.

Second, the motivation or reward of doing what he is already doing is higher than the motivation or reward of doing what you are asking. This is why some dogs won't, for example, recall when they are playing or chasing squirrels. So make sure what you offer is of far higher value - or, if you can't beat something like a squirrel chase, don't allow the opportunity for it to happen (i.e. don't set him up to fail). Use a leash or a long line to keep control.

Third, you are working against a deeply rooted breed trait that the dog has been selectively bred for over centuries. There is a reason why we don't use terriers to herd sheep - it can be done but it is a lot harder.
 

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Is there something specific you are struggling with, maybe we can come up with a few ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is there something specific you are struggling with, maybe we can come up with a few ideas.
Well, yes. I have a problem with housebreaking him, that's my biggest issue, I understand that he may not want to go outside to get his little paws cold in the winter, but I put puppy pads down, and I have picked up feces and put them on there, and put other encouraging things there, and he still thinks my carpet is a better option. And I wish I had a dollar for every time I stepped in poo. XD. He's a little stinker, but he is adorable!!
 

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Unfortunately puppy pads give mixed messages about whether indoor toileting is allowed or not.

So I'd recommend getting rid of them completely and taking him out frequently to toilet, for eexample every hour. You want him to be outside at those times when he needs to toilet.

Immediately he toilets outside, generously reward with something fabulous like roast chicken or frankfurter sausage. It has to be immediate to be clear that it is for toileting and it has to be fabulous to make it worth the effort of holding his toilet until he is out.

If you take him out and he doesn't toilet after five minutes, bring him in but don't take your eyes off him. Any hint of a toilet inside, scoop him up and get him out fast. If he doesn't try to toilet indoors (great!) take him out a second time and repeat until you do get outside toilets. You need the outside toilet to happen SO that you can reward SO that he learns.

If he has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed he may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if he needs to toilet (by going off and toileting out of sight) - the opposite of what you want. Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at him TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. Just clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract him back to the spot.

Indoors if you see him circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get him out fast.
 
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