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Hi, we have a 2yo Italian greyhound (male) and a 10wo Italian greyhound (female) puppy. Since the puppy arrived, my older dog has been curious about her and mostly playful with her, but her arrival has also made him very anxious.

About three days after we got her, he vomited in his crate and night and had diarrhea a few times the next day. That calmed down, but over the last day or so he's had diarrhea and a noisy tum again.

One problem is that I and/or my husband is with the puppy a lot without our older dog. We mostly have the puppy confined to the kitchen; when our older dog is in here with us he has an "escape route" (stairs that are too big for the puppy currently) so he can leave. But when he's in the room with her they play until things get too rambunctious. He will correct her and she will really go for him, snarling and all. Our vet says she may not really know how to play correctly yet, but I feel like this is stressing out our older dog to the point of him being depressed. And of course, trying to potty train a puppy while dealing with another dog's GI issues is no picnic. :-/

My questions are - is this type of anxiety something other people have experienced when adding a new puppy to the family? And does anyone have suggestions for ways the dogs can be together calmly? When they are very sleepy they will share a bed or blanket. I do go through things like sit, down, stay with both of them and reward with treats, which works nicely, but only holds the puppy's attention for so long. I've also given them both stuffed Kongs to work on, but sometimes they get a bit too interested in what the other one has. I would gladly welcome other suggestions.
 

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I know literally nothing about greyhounds as a race but I do know something about dogs in general. In general the older the dog gets the harder it will be to introduce a puppy to it. Puppies are often not aware of the older dog's "comfort zone" and will violate that by charging right up to the older dog in the assumption that since they are cute everyone will love them..... Older dogs don't see things that way.

In my mind (and I must say at this point that I am NOT a trainer, only a hack with some experience with dogs) the best way to introduce a puppy to an older dog is to put the puppy in a crate and give the older dog time to approach it at their own tempo. Once the older dog has a chance to adjust without the younger dog rushing at it, THEN you introduce them to each other without the younger dog being contained.

Does that make any sense?
 

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It does make sense, thank you for the suggestion. At first, we had the puppy in an ex-pen so the dogs could be close to one another without having to directly interact. But it seemed to agitate the puppy and it wasn't conducive to potty training so once they'd had some time to acclimate we removed the ex-pen. If they can each focus on something besides each other, things are fairly calm...but b/c the pup is mostly confined to the kitchen it starts to feel a bit Thunderdome when they're both in there. Playtime always starts well enough with tug-of-war and chasing around the room, but quickly escalates to snarling etc.

I don't know enough to know if they're still getting used to each other (it's been just less than three weeks) or if I need to be redirecting them more to encourage a calmer relationship.
 

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This may be not the expert opinion, but he may be just too nervous/sensitive and overreacts too much. I've seen that doggolab recommends calming treats, that can help him not to overreact and calm his nerve system. I heard that it happens with dogs and cats sometimes. And it's not rare with humans. I even heard about lizards and snakes that become overwhelmed just because some other live creature touched them.
Ask your vet for sedatives recommendation, maybe?
 

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But when he's in the room with her they play until things get too rambunctious. He will correct her and she will really go for him, snarling and all.
I'm not an expert in multi dog households but it would ease his stress levels if you intervene before it gets to this stage. It's not really his job to teach your puppy good manners, it's yours. Maybe keep a house line on the pup so you can easily draw her away.
 

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This is very normal in dogs, especially if the original dog is used to living on his own. I would recommend having the pup on a long line while you're in the kitchen with both of them so that you can keep an eye on them. If and when they start playing, allow them to so long as they are both respectful of each other.

If your male corrects the pup jump in there as backup to show the pup what your dog meant. Ie. Female is being too rough so male nips her or snarls. Female growls back/ doesn't submit to the correction, right at that moment tell her that what she is doing is wrong in a way she understands. It's typical for puppies to be confused by other dogs' language and sometimes you need to be there to make it more clear for her.

However, don't reinforce the behavior of your older dog. The corrections he give must remain only as corrections. I don't know if he is a dominant dog, but you want him to see the other dog as a member of the family in training, not as an easy target or intruder so push him off the pup after he gives his correction.
 

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Thank you everyone. As the days go by the dogs are getting a bit better with each other. But the puppy being a puppy does get annoying for my older dog so we cut things off pretty quickly when he seems like he might be over it. They will play tug now and chase each other but then we break if off and set them up with licky mats or stuffed Kongs. And the puppy has been attending a socialization class where she can learn.
 

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It sounds like you've gotten some good advice and are doing the right things. As has been said already, interrupt them before their play gets too rough and get that puppy around other puppies her own age. That is the best way for her to learn dog behavior. Good luck!
 
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