Dog Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay...my dog has great hearing, when she wants to hear you. :mad:

Today my dog crossed the street (without checking traffic) to visit my neighbor. No amount of calling on my part made a difference. Its like she's deaf. She does this when she gets an interesting smell or makes to make a social call.

Its very frustrating and I sound like an idiot...and I'm calling her in a friendly tone...then a more abrupt (but not angry) tone to make it through the fog. But more importantly, I don't want her hit by a car or run away.

I'm thinking about trying s vibration collar (no shock), that maybe a vibration would break her focus on the distraction (neighbor, cat, smell, SQUIRREL!).

Anyone here have any experience with a vibration collar on their dog?
 

·
Premium Member
Zoe, Phoenix, Alice - ACDx
Joined
·
4,351 Posts
So this dog probably shouldn't be off leash again until you build her attention on you and a reliable recall. I would buy a long line and work her on that until she is better trained.

Kikopup on youtube has some amazing training videos. I would recommend checking them out. Check out her "building attention" series and how to train a recall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,519 Posts
This is not an issue with your dog or her "selective hearing", it's lack of consistent training. If she has not fully been taught and has grasped what the cue "come" means, she shouldn't be off-leash yet.

The LAST thing you need to do is buy an e-collar, vibration or not. That's taking the easy way out, with possible negative affects on your dog.

Putting in the time and effort to fully train her to "come" will have longer lasting results, will actually teach her what you want instead of correcting her for something she doesn't yet know she's doing wrong, and will not affect her negatively, as using a vibration collar would.

It will also help build your bond with your dog. If your dog wants to come to you, you no longer have this issue. Start by either practicing in your home or (if it's fenced) backyard, and/or buy a long lead (you can get cheap ones online, but Wal-mart also has them for about $10.).

These videos will help you teach a solid recall, as well as teach her to focus on you, and pay attention to you and what you want from her. :)





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
I live in a quiet neighbourhood, but I would never let a dog out the front without being leashed... My neighbour across the road does it all the time, and it's dangerous, because the drivers of the cars won't know that they're not going to run out on the road...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,335 Posts
Dogs don't have selective hearing.... Your dog just isn't trained or trained properly/adequately.

BTW, calling her in a more stern or abrupt voice will actually decrease a dog's inclination to come back to you. At the very least, they'll slow down.... Or they'll just stop and look away. These are their natural calming responses to someone they perceive as threatening (you when you yell).

I strongly suggest you work on recall as ZoesMom and Megs suggested. Those are great videos above, too.

And ditto keeping her on a leash or only in her fenced yard. If she darts the doors, time to teach her going through the door is only allowed with an okay from you or when on a leash.

One last thing... a lot of dogs don't look for traffic. Heck, a lot of people don't. You can teach her to always sit at a curb or crosswalk.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Megs87

·
Registered
Joined
·
452 Posts
Sounds like your dog is not only not WANTING to listen to you but also not understanding what you're asking. Dogs don't just "get" what you're asking of them. Dogs don't know what you want when you say "come" unless you've properly trained AND practiced a reliable recall. You might have trained a recall, but have you continuously practiced it? Dogs can forget what you're asking if you haven't practiced it. That's like learning to play the guitar and then not practicing for a year and then expecting to be able to play like a pro. It doesn't work that way (trust me :p ).

You want to show your dog that coming to you when you call them is much more rewarding then ignoring you. First of all, NEVER call your dog to you unless you KNOW they will come. If they seem more interested in something else and you don't think they'll come if you call, then don't call. If you do, they'll actually learn that NOT coming when called is more rewarding then coming, and so they won't come (they might even run the opposite way).

Get the best rewards possible and make coming to you FUN. Make it a game, if you can. Read this: Teaching a Reliable Recall - Whole Dog Journal Article

As it explains in the article above, your recall word is probably "poisoned." This means you've used it so much with no success that your dog just tunes it out and won't listen. I suggest finding a new recall word and training recall from the beginning. Don't feel bad that you have to do this, I've had to retrain a recall before, too.

Just make it fun for the dog. Always end the training session with the dog wanting more, not with the dog getting bored. After about 5 or 10 minutes of recall training and my dog is still having fun, I end it even though my dog wasn't bored. This makes the dog wanting more and they'll be more willing to listen next time around.

Also remember to use a variety of treats or toys so they never know what they'll get!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
Work harder on the recall, as advised above.

You need to put her on a leash, take her to the curb (or shoulder), take a few steps back and say, "come". Go up and down the street, bringing her to the edge of the road and asking for come. Use treats and praise. Next day, spend time at the curb, but with you farther away asking for come. Next day, walk with her into the road, turn, take a few steps back, and ask for come. In other words, work her on the recall in the exact places that she is weak for the recall.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top