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Healing takes 7 to 10 days - if U are concerned, SEE THE VET

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Is he wearing a cone-collar, or anything to keep his tongue off the incision?
If he has no Elizabethan / cone collar, nor a cervical collar, NOR a large-size "onesie" that covers his entire belly -
I'd get one or more of the above, & put 'em on. :thumbsup: ImMEEDiately.

He doesn't have to spend 8-hrs a day licking it, to introduce bacteria - or just moisture, in which microbe-popns explode.
The odd lick, once or twice in a 12-hr period, is quite sufficient to cause problems.

Is he being kept on leash? -
He shouldn't be OFF leash for any outside trips whatever for approx 10-days.
Stitches are generally removed around day 5 to day 7, depending - but if they're absorbable, they don't get cut & removed, they stay in place & disintegrate. [Hopefully.]
He's not allowed to run - he can walk just as far as U are willing to walk him, & still have energy enuf to walk him back home again -- but no running, no jumping, no off-leash time when he might decide to charge after a squirrel, & jump onto the tree where the chatterer fled.

He also cannot be outside a confined area, preferably a crate, whenever U aren't home to monitor him - even if he's indoors, inside the house. JUMPING is a no-no while his sutures are holding the incision - so he can't be free in the house when at home solo, as he could easily jump onto a sofa, onto or OFF a bed, or sprint down the stairs, & split his incision or pop multiple stitches. :eek:
He must WALK up & down all stairs, 1 step at a time - no hopping 2 & 3 steps in a bound, nor launching from the landing to thud onto the floor below!

If U have any concerns - swelling, puffiness around stitches, DRAINAGE with color, a feeling of HEAT from the incision / much warmer than surrounding tissue, etc, go see a vet.
If he flinches or yelps when it's touched, SEE THE VET - it should be only slightly tender to pressure, not painful to touch.

If U know how to take a rectal temp, that's an excellent cross-check for any developing fever - 100.2 to 101.2 'F is normal for a dog who's not exerting themselves, AND is not in a warm, humid environment.
If the house is over 70 'F & it's over 60% humidity indoors, he may even pant a little - tho he's just lying around.
If his core temp hits 102.2 'F or higher, he's running a fever; over 103 is a trip to the vet, as seizures can begin at 103.5 'F.

Hope he heals with no complications - over 99% of M dogs do. :thumbsup:

- terry

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He doesn't have to spend 8-hrs a day licking it, to introduce bacteria - or just moisture, in which microbe-popns explode.
The odd lick, once or twice in a 12-hr period, is quite sufficient to cause problems.



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The comment above is one side of the fence and there is another. I have been somewhat curious about the tendency of dogs to lick wounds because most all seem to and wondered if it was a significant drawback in the process of the wound healing. There are numerous wives' tales about a dog's saliva and potential benefits which date back many centuries. I certainly cannot attest to the veracity of the supposed benefits but research has defined certain benefits and reasoning as to why a dog among other animals might lick their wounds. A few are quoted below.

" Recent research has identified products in saliva that indeed aid in healing.

  • Researchers in the Netherlands identified a chemical in pet saliva called histatins. Histatins speed wound healing by promoting the spread and migration of new skin cells.
  • Dr. Nigel Benjamin of the London School of medicine has shown that when saliva contacts skin it creates nitric oxide. Nitric oxide inhibits bacterial growth and protects wounds from infection.
  • Researchers at the University of Florida isolated a protein in saliva called Nerve Growth Factor that halves the time for wound healing."

I am of the belief that dogs may exhibit this behavior because there actually could be a method to their "madness".



Sometimes humans are too quick to claim that a dog's innate actions are somewhat comparable to a phobic human's with similar results. I'm more of an observer and investigate.

As far as the wound's appearance, it doesn't look necessarily bad BUT if you have any real concerns, just send the same pic to your vet and get their opinion rather than any opinion from this forum.
 

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Agree with having the Vet check him out if you have any doubts or questions. I would skip the photo and make the trip to the Vets for that checkup.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well we did the collar for one day. Our house is so small and he couldn’t get around. He did not lick. I forgot to mention that he likes to lay frog style on the floor and drag his belly. We did take him to the vet. She prescribed Keflex and an anti inflammatory. He had an allergic reaction to the Keflex. (Research said a lot of large breeds are allergic to Keflex). Day 3 of Keflex, he wouldn’t eat, drink, or go to potty. Just lethargic. We stopped the meds. And he healed up just fine. I believe the lumps are scar tissue now. And I wanted to post this bc I looked everywhere for days 1-7 days of healing process and couldn’t find a thing. Hopefully Max’s story can help someone in the future.
 

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