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I've really been struggling with figuring out how much exercise Stella needs or if she's just being demanding.

I've never had a high energy/high intelligence dog so this is a new experience for me. That being said, I've put more effort and energy into exercising, training and entertaining Stella than I have for all the other dogs I've owned combined.

I recently bought a book about behaviors to train into your dog to calm them and I saw something in the first chapter that really interested me. It said that sometimes dogs can be/stay hyped up if they get TOO MUCH exercise, like a kid that can't settled down after a trip to the amusement park.

So...what do you think about her exercise regime? Every day Stella gets 2-3 romps in the backyard, often frisbee mixed with sniffing and trotting around the yard that lasts from 15-30 minutes. In the evenings I walk her typically 1-1.7 miles and she usually gets a pb and treats stuffed Kong and when we're out during the day she often gets a bully stick or nubs or something like that. But then later at night she's usually still being a pain in the butt demand barking, pulling covers off the couch, pacing and generally being a nuisance. Do you think this is enough for an almost 2 year old ACD/Catahoula type dog? Should I be doing more? Is she just being a brat and needs to settle down? Am I doing too much? What do you think?
 

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I think that's more than enough. At some point you have to just cut them off and command that they lay down and be quiet. The problem with exercising them too much is that they get more fit so they can go for even longer, and also they are kept so busy that they don't know how to be quiet.

I have a very high energy beagle/rott mix. She can go all day if you let her. But when we're in the house and I'm trying to relax, she is to go lay down and not bother me, and she knows it. She can chew or sleep those are her only options. I think it's very reasonable to expect them to chill out and not demand attention at times.
 

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I energy dogs can be difficult, especially working dogs. Have a neighbor that has a Border Collie, he is always looking to herd something, or someone. His energy is virtually boundless.
 

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I agree, that sounds good. Have you tried getting her to settle in her crate or on a mat at the end of the day? Maybe save something long lasting or some kind of puzzle toy for the end of the day to keep her occupied. Have you tried something more mentally taxing at night rather then physically? Just a thought but maybe working her brain a little at the end of the day might help curb her night time energy.
I do agree with ChessaQ though, I think either way working towards her having a off switch/being able to settle when in the house is a good place to start.
 

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Pax is 1/2 Border Collie and walks are not exercise for him...they are just stimulus outlets. I either need to take him to the beach where he can run free or for a bike walk if I want to do ANY sort of energy management with him. Walks regardless of length just get him more amped up.

Having a high energy dog myself, sounds like she may not be getting enough vigorous physical exercise to take the edge off. Some dogs a walk is all they need...not a high energy dog. 15 min of frisbee ain't gonna do it.
 

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I would personally work in more mental stuff to see what happens. I tend to do little straight forward physical exercise with my high energy dogs. Most physical exercise I do incorporates training games/exercises.
So for example walks aren't just a casual walk. We do some heelwork, recall games, sometimes nosework searches if I can set up hides ahead of time, parkour behaviors with the things we come across, etc. along the way between sniffing/exploring (a reward). Or fetch/flirt pole... I use that toy play to work impulse control and also build obedience/freestyle behaviors and heeling into the game.

I would suggest making it a point to always follow mental/physical exercise with a calm activity such as a chew item (if not already consistently doing this). Just helps create an off switch and ime a dog who will self entertain at least to a point.

You may also find capturing calmness, matwork, biofeedback, and impulse control exercises helpful in the long run.
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What does downtime look like in your house? What I am getting at is do you have a crate for her that you can put her in to isolate from stimulation. That would be my suggestion. If she is too wired for a crate then you need to do some work and more stimulation be it mental or physical is not the answer.
 

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I would add in difficult trick training sessions that will tire her mentally, instead of physically. A high drive dog does require a lot of exercise, but often people forget that they also want to be given a JOB that requires them to think and problem solve. For my dog, I give him a new "assignment" every week (assuming he figured out the last one) and we work on it. a 5-10 minute trick training session will tire her much more than a 30 minute walk.

Also consider getting a weighted pack for her walks. My dog LOVES them.

ALSO I'll add that my dog runs with me 3 miles 4x a week, the other days he plays long hours with the other dog, and I do fast paced fetch games where he does a lot of running, also. Walks aren't enough!
 
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As a person who NEEDS an hour of exercise per day or I get seriously cranky, I'll say, first, meet the physical exercise needs. They may have been met, if the frisbee games are fast. You can add in working for that game, down, wait, get it!!! etc. work in more exercises, or tricks to get to the frisbee... to make it more mentally stimulating. I actually think frisbee is an awesome exercise if it's active and engaged.
But I wouldn't underestimate the physical either.
That said, don't do more than your willing or comfortable with. I would not bike my own dog all summer and then expect him to be happy with a leashed walk all winter (so I would never bike my dog).
If what you're doing now is all yyou want to offer, it sounds sufficient, especially is there is off-leash times that include dog running flat out fast. Off-lead in the woods time has really settled my own guy, he's happier, calmer, more playful (from zero play & unhappy hyper).
Routines help in the chill department. Downtime is downtime.
And now I have to take myself out for a walk--because I really really NEED the exercise....
 

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I've really been struggling with figuring out how much exercise Stella needs or if she's just being demanding.

I've never had a high energy/high intelligence dog so this is a new experience for me. That being said, I've put more effort and energy into exercising, training and entertaining Stella than I have for all the other dogs I've owned combined.

I recently bought a book about behaviors to train into your dog to calm them and I saw something in the first chapter that really interested me. It said that sometimes dogs can be/stay hyped up if they get TOO MUCH exercise, like a kid that can't settled down after a trip to the amusement park.

So...what do you think about her exercise regime? Every day Stella gets 2-3 romps in the backyard, often frisbee mixed with sniffing and trotting around the yard that lasts from 15-30 minutes. In the evenings I walk her typically 1-1.7 miles and she usually gets a pb and treats stuffed Kong and when we're out during the day she often gets a bully stick or nubs or something like that. But then later at night she's usually still being a pain in the butt demand barking, pulling covers off the couch, pacing and generally being a nuisance. Do you think this is enough for an almost 2 year old ACD/Catahoula type dog? Should I be doing more? Is she just being a brat and needs to settle down? Am I doing too much? What do you think?
What breed in case I missed that?
Our two year old beast gets six to ten miles a day. I'm seventy years old so it's good for me too! He can still be a bit stroppy but usually settles down for a nap between walks and lets you know when he is ready for the next round.

I've found that the effort you put in gets rewarded several times over. Dog ownenship is a significant responsibility if you want to get the best from it for both yourself and the dog.
 

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@Besoeker She's an ACD/Catahoula probably with something else. I understand how big a responsibility dogs are, but that doesn't mean I have the time or energy to walk Stella anything near 6-10 miles a day. I literally dedicated every day of my life to training and entertaining this dog for the first 7 months I had her. But I have to work. Not only that but I work as a dog walker (ironically having less or little time to walk my own dog) so I usually walk several miles a day anyway and come home just wanting to fall on the floor. I'm at a really difficult time in my life financially and emotionally, and I feel like no matter how much I give (when I already feel like I have nothing left) it's just never enough for her. Not only that but one of the things I was planning to do with Stella from the time she was a puppy was take her to daycare regularly but several months ago she started being dog reactive and not enjoying playing with other dogs, so I don't trust leaving her there anymore. So I'm trying hard but she never seems satisfied.
 

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@Besoeker She's an ACD/Catahoula probably with something else. I understand how big a responsibility dogs are, but that doesn't mean I have the time or energy to walk Stella anything near 6-10 miles a day. I literally dedicated every day of my life to training and entertaining this dog for the first 7 months I had her. But I have to work. Not only that but I work as a dog walker (ironically having less or little time to walk my own dog) so I usually walk several miles a day anyway and come home just wanting to fall on the floor. I'm at a really difficult time in my life financially and emotionally, and I feel like no matter how much I give (when I already feel like I have nothing left) it's just never enough for her. Not only that but one of the things I was planning to do with Stella from the time she was a puppy was take her to daycare regularly but several months ago she started being dog reactive and not enjoying playing with other dogs, so I don't trust leaving her there anymore. So I'm trying hard but she never seems satisfied.
Shame you can't walk your dog with the others you have to walk.
 

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Have you tried biking or some other form of urban mushing with her instead of just walking a mile? That way she can get a little more exercise by going at a faster pace/running, and depending on if she's pulling you or not (vrs. for example the bike atachments that have them walk/run next to you instead of out front) you wont have to work as hard so you can go further.
 

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Shame you can't walk your dog with the others you have to walk.
I have thought this too a lot. It's really frustrating. But I work for a pet service that operates out of a luxury apartment building 30 minutes from my house. In the event it ever takes off so much that I could afford to live there I'd love to do that. But honestly I'm not even sure if she would do well enough with the other dogs to walk with them. I'm hoping she would, because ideally that's what I would want to work up to, but yeah, sadly now it's just not possible.
@Sabina88 I don't have a bike and really, I'm not athletic enough for some of that stuff. Plus with her prey drive if I hooked her up to a bike and she saw a squirrel she would kill me! But maybe I can look up what urban mushing is like.
 

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Actually, if you bike with the dog beside you, its pretty easy to keep them moving forward past distractions, since the forward momentum never really allows them to stop and put a lot of force into moving sideways. When I bike with a dog (just littles now, but big dogs previously, and one was a handful), I usually teach them to speed up past other animals/people- not necessarily intentionally, but as they start to get distracted, I speed up to get their attention and keep them moving, and they end up learning to go fast past distractions :) I would think it might be similar with a scooter, but they probably have a little more influence with regard to where you go.

I would be wary of just exercising non-stop, as that usually results in dogs that NEED non-stop exercise. Instead, I would make concise "go times" and "relax times", and enforce appropriately. Initially you may need to use a leash, tie down, or crate to prevent frenetic activity during relaxing times, and reward for voluntary quiet behavior during those times. Make sure she gets enough exercise to take the edge off, but don't obsess over it. She'll get it eventually.

Of course, given her breed(s), she does need some form of brain exercise every day. Maybe try some backyard agility, and if she takes to it, try a class? Or nosework? Most dogs seem to find that quite satisfying.
 

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You can do urban mushing with a lot of different things, bikes, skateboards, scooters, carts and probably some others i'm forgetting. Some (I don't know if they all do) bike atachments that have them at your side have a safety release and the one I know of says its suppose to take most of the pull. They also have scooter atachments that keep them next to you rather then running out in front of you. If possible it might be a good option to look into to just get that extra bit of energy out. And since you would be using a bike/scooter/skateboard/ect, you would be able to go farther at a faster pace with out getting tired as quickly.

Like busannie said, maybe setting up a simple agility coarse in your backyard and doing that for one of her outside block times or in a adition to, will help give her that extra mental and physical activity.
 

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Have you ever walked her with a pack on?
 
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