Dog Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my 10mo old lab os really lacking on lease manners. Ive been trying since shes been a puppy but due to my best efforts she still pulls and tugs. So ive been looking at these no-pull harnesses and im wondering if they actually help. Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
Some do, some don't. But, like every other no-pull product out there, it really is just a tool to help you teach LLW. I'm having great success with a head halter, and it look like I should be able to begin the phasing-out stage fairly soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Some do, some don't. But, like every other no-pull product out there, it really is just a tool to help you teach LLW. I'm having great success with a head halter, and it look like I should be able to begin the phasing-out stage fairly soon.
Do you have a good recommendation of one that works?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
They do work on most dogs, but they do not teach the dog not to pull. You should still be working on training not to pull. I use one for Freyja just because she is so strong and sometimes forgets herself. I also have a head halter which also works for her, but some dogs really hate them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
Do you have a good recommendation of one that works?
Hm, I can't really say that I do, simply because I've never really used them. The ones recommended at the school I work at are the EasyWalk harnesses (Tada!) but I personally don't have any experience using them.

I have seen lots of people coming into class with no pull harnesses being dragged in by their dog. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I had good experience with the gentle leader. Our dog hated it at first - didn't like the feel of it around his nose, but it worked wonders for pulling. We eventually weaned him off and he became a great walker. I agree with the previous poster that you still need to work with him, but if you are a small person with a large dog, it definitely helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ill definitely continue to work with her.
So the head halter has the same concept? Help training her to stop pulling?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
I've used both a head halter and a sensation harness (front ring attachment) From my experience if you dog is motivated to pull its going to pull regardless of what you put on it. BUT they do assist with the training.

I'd suggest the harness first as I think of the head harness as a more last resort. I think it takes a lot of work to desensitize the head halter for most dogs.

Then train train train. Here is a great video show loose leash walking.

Kikopup has a whole youtube series on loose leash walking.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7287C737FB745168
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,613 Posts
Ill definitely continue to work with her.
So the head halter has the same concept? Help training her to stop pulling?
It gives you the option to apply gentle pressure to redirect your dog's attention towards you. Then proceed with clicking and treating (or however you reward) for her being in the correct position (wherever you decide you want that to be). Once you've had a long stretch of no-pulling on the head harness, try attaching it to her collar (but keep the harness on). If she pulls, clip it back to her harness, and keep it on for a while before you try again.

It does need to be conditioned a little bit, but it is definitely doable with some games. Click and treating for looking at it, then for touching it, then for putting her nose through it. Build up to being able to click the clip without the nose loop on. Then put the full thin on and feed her dinner. Then immediately off. Then if she likes tugging, put it on have a game of tug. Stop the game, and take it off. She will soon learn that the head halter means good things. Obviously this will take some time.

I've found a hidden perk, is that some people think it looks like a muzzle, so they actually leave us alone while we are walking. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
So it wouldnt be a good idea to only put it on when we're going for a walkor training leash manners?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Follow up, when purchasing for a halter/harness should i go with body weight, nexk size, or breed? Ive seen halters stating a certain size is for a lab, but the size below matchs her current neck/ weight. She is 50lbs and 17" neck. I was looking at halti and gentle leaders halts and a harness from walmart
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
The best harness we've tried is the Freedom Harness. We bought ours off Amazon.com. It comes in a variety of colours, and I like there is a soft velour strap underneath the armpits that eliminates chafing. I personally really don't like head halters...I've heard of dogs who have had neck injuries due to whiplash from using it.

I'm hoping to phase the harness out eventually and just use a regular flat collar. Right now, our adolescent is still too excited by other dogs, geese, new places etc and etc. He is 11 months now...targeting 2 years. Here's to goals! :)

Our boy is super strong (mastiff mix) so the harness helps a lot when he catches me off guard and pulls towards a dog. But one should still practice loose leash walking when using it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
The best harness we've tried is the Freedom Harness. We bought ours off Amazon.com. It comes in a variety of colours, and I like there is a soft velour strap underneath the armpits that eliminates chafing. I personally really don't like head halters...I've heard of dogs who have had neck injuries due to whiplash from using it.

I'm hoping to phase the harness out eventually and just use a regular flat collar. Right now, our adolescent is still too excited by other dogs, geese, new places etc and etc. He is 11 months now...targeting 2 years. Here's to goals! :)

Our boy is super strong (mastiff mix) so the harness helps a lot when he catches me off guard and pulls towards a dog. But one should still practice loose leash walking when using it.
I am glad the Freedom is working for your mastiff mix, I can't say it really stopped my mastiff at 11 months old from pulling, he could easily pull right through it. I also didn't like the way the girth strap, even though it is covered in velvet, rubbed under his armpits. I ended up having to use it with a head collar (Dogmatic), but even with both that didn't stop the pulling, but I did help me manage him better so that at least I was a bit more confident that I could just about control him when walking. Things didn't improve until I worked on increasing his connection/attraction to me through "pushing". Within two weeks of starting that he was a different dog. He was over four years old before we had the breakthrough, he now walks nicely on a wide 2" Blocky Dogs Dual Grip collar which I highly recommend for BIG dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
No. No-pull leashes might work at first, mostly because they're just bothering the dog and feel strange to them but eventually the dog will get used to it and the pulling will reappear. The only thing to do is to train loose leash walking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
No. No-pull leashes might work at first, mostly because they're just bothering the dog and feel strange to them but eventually the dog will get used to it and the pulling will reappear. The only thing to do is to train loose leash walking.

I don't think this is always true. I do use one on Freyja because she is very strong and I have back problems. She walks great most of the time but she is young and will pull at times. While she can still pull this lessens it. I also use on for Vegas, he normally walks well too. But I can't take the chance of being pulled and he is dog reactive, I think because he has been attacked a few times by smaller dogs. Vegas has used one on and off for a couple of years. I do agree that it is no substitute for training, but it can aid you while training. It is true that it will not work for all dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
I don't think this is always true. I do use one on Freyja because she is very strong and I have back problems. She walks great most of the time but she is young and will pull at times. While she can still pull this lessens it. I also use on for Vegas, he normally walks well too. But I can't take the chance of being pulled and he is dog reactive, I think because he has been attacked a few times by smaller dogs. Vegas has used one on and off for a couple of years. I do agree that it is no substitute for training, but it can aid you while training. It is true that it will not work for all dogs.
I use a halti for the exact same reasons. It definitely makes it harder for them to pull but they can still pull. I thought OP was more so wondering if no-pulls create a perfect heel and I don't think they do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
917 Posts
I use a halti for the exact same reasons. It definitely makes it harder for them to pull but they can still pull. I thought OP was more so wondering if no-pulls create a perfect heel and I don't think they do.

I agree with that, about creating a perfect heel. They don't really teach the dog to walk on a loose leash. You still need to train, but it can help you get some control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
I'd agree with annageckos. They don't really do anything/much for the behavior itself, but they do make the pulling less uncomfortable for the handler while you're training loose leash walking.

There are 2 main things I'm concerned about when walking. #1 is the comfort of the dog and strain on their body from their gear and #2 is my own comfort. One of my biggest pet peeves is pulling dogs. Also, one of my dogs has a thick black coat (lab/BC mix) and one is mostly black and has a short snout (Boston Terrier); if its around 70* and sunny or bright both are panting to cool themselves, which is not helped by a collar straining their throat. I don't like flat collars for either of them because they place strain on the trachea if they pull at all. For the lab mix this is more for comfort, for the Boston and her shortened snout its more about her ability to cool herself and her general safety. As well as the tracheal strain, flat collars sit on a part of the neck that gives the least control to the handler (the thickest part). Back-clip harnesses fix the issue of pressing on the trachea but give the handler even less control.

Front-clip (ie, no pull) harnesses fix both the issue of pressing on the trachea and the amount of control the handler has.

When pulling, both my medium and small dogs cannot get as much leverage in a front clip harness as in a back clip one. Also, both are pretty soft dogs and the slight discomfort from pulling is enough to naturally deter them in moments they otherwise might (ie, towards a fun smell). That said, neither were trained immediately by using one. The larger one was trained with a prong and leash corrections (I don't think I will ever train another dog this way, though, I have since switched methods; this was 6 years ago) and the small, younger Boston was trained using positive reinforcement (taught a 'heel' as well as a 'go ahead' or free command using a clicker and treats, also praised for choosing of her own free will to move to heel vs pulling or walking behind).

If someone were to ask me the best thing to walk their dog in, though, I would 100% say a front clip harness. Always make sure it is a martingale type, though (like the easy walk, which is what I use; meaning it has a loop on the chest that allows it to tighten). Also, I wouldn't bother with any of the back-clip martingale harnesses. Also, I would be sure that you either attach the harness to a collar with a caribeaner or clip the leash to both the collar and harness, because some dogs do wriggle out of them.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top