Dog Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I have kinda gotten a bit famous around my neighbourhood because of my dog. Because in normal standards he is very well behaved, people have asked me if I could walk their dogs too.

I have never walked a pack, but I would totally love to walk some dogs and teach them the basics (leash training, come when called, wait, sit, etc) and addressing some issues per dog (barking, being too scared, etc). None of these dogs are violent and most are medium or small size, so I can control them.

Mine is a border collie, about 3.5 years old, likes to smell all living things but gets a bit nervous sometimes. He has never been aggressive or bitten another dog or person. He also has a very high energy. I am hoping this pack walks will help.

Any tips on how to walk a pack, insert a new member to the pack, work with scared dogs and such, is welcome :3
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
283 Posts
So I have kinda gotten a bit famous around my neighbourhood because of my dog. Because in normal standards he is very well behaved, people have asked me if I could walk their dogs too.

I have never walked a pack, but I would totally love to walk some dogs and teach them the basics (leash training, come when called, wait, sit, etc) and addressing some issues per dog (barking, being too scared, etc). None of these dogs are violent and most are medium or small size, so I can control them.

Mine is a border collie, about 3.5 years old, likes to smell all living things but gets a bit nervous sometimes. He has never been aggressive or bitten another dog or person. He also has a very high energy. I am hoping this pack walks will help.

Any tips on how to walk a pack, insert a new member to the pack, work with scared dogs and such, is welcome :3
I don't have experience of walking a pack of dogs but I think a collie is a good start. Tonight, I was walking ours, Max, and a neighbour was waiting for his little dog to go home. Max led him to the gate. I don't know how he works that out but collies are very smart dogs.

I wish you well in your endeavour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
I think you should start off slowly with a couple of dogs and as you add them, again go slowly. You may have to do shifts if certain dogs are too scared, etc. Once you get to know the personalities of the dogs, you'll know which dogs go better together or not. Good luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
My opinion:
If you are walking the dogs as an occasional favor, that is one thing. If you are starting a dog walking business and are charging money for your services:

Buy insurance. YOU are responsible if one of the dogs bites another of the dogs, or much more expensive, a person (Dog bites where the dog bites a person average $32,000) And in that vein, make sure they all have rabies shots.

Document everything: if the dog is brought to you or you get it and it looks tired, ill (send it home) or has a cut or injury document it in a notebook and in the case of an injury take a picture, so the dog owner cannot say it happened while you had the dog.
If the dog, despite a long walk, doesn't do its business let the owner know. Just out of courtesy, so the owner can take a smaller walk later in the day for the dog's benefit.

Take along bags and paper towels to pick up poop so everyone in the neighborhood will continue to love you.

Keep track of your earnings. If you make enough to pay taxes, there are various deductions you can take. I'd be honest too, if you don't report your earnings and some little incident happens up the line, and a person in authority asks you how long you've been doing it, and it has been a couple years, that fact might get back to the taxing entity and if you haven't reported, you will wish you had.

Charge enough money to take care of all these various obligations and expenses, so that you will have enough left to make it worthwhile.

Stay small enough so it will be fun, not a drudgery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
My opinion:
If you are walking the dogs as an occasional favor, that is one thing. If you are starting a dog walking business and are charging money for your services:

Buy insurance. YOU are responsible if one of the dogs bites another of the dogs, or much more expensive, a person (Dog bites where the dog bites a person average $32,000) And in that vein, make sure they all have rabies shots.

Document everything: if the dog is brought to you or you get it and it looks tired, ill (send it home) or has a cut or injury document it in a notebook and in the case of an injury take a picture, so the dog owner cannot say it happened while you had the dog.
If the dog, despite a long walk, doesn't do its business let the owner know. Just out of courtesy, so the owner can take a smaller walk later in the day for the dog's benefit.

Take along bags and paper towels to pick up poop so everyone in the neighborhood will continue to love you.

Keep track of your earnings. If you make enough to pay taxes, there are various deductions you can take. I'd be honest too, if you don't report your earnings and some little incident happens up the line, and a person in authority asks you how long you've been doing it, and it has been a couple years, that fact might get back to the taxing entity and if you haven't reported, you will wish you had.

Charge enough money to take care of all these various obligations and expenses, so that you will have enough left to make it worthwhile.

Stay small enough so it will be fun, not a drudgery.
I live in Argentina and there is no insurance, but I did get a small license thing that allows me to walk dogs. In general, I have all that covered but it is a super good tip on all this. Thanks :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,885 Posts
Hi! We have a member here (@BusterBCsmum) who is a professional dog walker with a border collie.

I also do group dog walking.

-Obey your local bylaws, pick up poop, and keep control of dogs. You need the neighborhood to like you.
-Take pictures! Owners love to see pictures of their dogs playing and having fun.
-Don't travel too far to pick up a client. Your costs will be most efficient if you serve pockets of dogs that are all in the same area.
-I walk 4-5 dogs on/off-leash at MOST. My happy number is 3-4. Don't be the person who tramps around with 15 dogs, plowing people off the sidewalks and scaring them out of parks. This also makes first aid a nightmare in the case of an emergency. Very risky. Start with 2 dogs and work your way up.
-You may want to invest in a waist leash. They make heavy pullers much more bearable. You can also either invest in or ask owners to provide you with a front clip harness.
-Stick to walking gear that you can get off a dog fast if they are panicking. I never walk dogs in chokes/martingales/buckle collars/prongs. I provide my own breakaway collar for the dog if the owner doesn't have one for them. I have had dogs get their mouth caught in another dog's collar and literally had to fumble for the breakway in their mouth.
-Walk compatible groups. Don't stick a small, nervous dog with a bunch of rowdy young dogs.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top