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Discussion Starter #1
The struggle is real.

I brought a new roommate into my house on June 1st, and along with her came a 2 y.o. Maltese mix named Milo. He's adorable and loves everyone, but we've been having some, um, "piss-ues" recently, and I really need some advice. Here's a quick background:

I've lived here for years with a female Mini Schnauzer named Annabelle, who is now five. She's very docile, and mainly just sleeps in my bed. She's completely housebroken, and typically only exerts any energy at all if a squirrel is around. I, personally, am a male, and work almost entirely from home.

So last month, I had a new female roommate move in, along with Milo. She assured me Milo was completely housebroken as well, and she's never had any issues. However, once they were settled that notion went very quickly out the window.

Milo started peeing on EVERYTHING. His favorite place, if he can find a way into my room, is on my bed. I've had to wash my sheets so many times I might as well invest in a laundromat. He pees on the couch, the rugs, and sometimes even just the hardwood floor.

She responded by buying him a "pee pressure belt", which is supposed to wrap around him and put pressure on his man-parts, preventing the urge to pee. But he pees right through it, like it doesn't even exist.

Quick research says this may be a dominance issue. I've tried taking over feeding, and I've tried gently knocking him with a newspaper, but nothing seems to work. I'm helpless. So to the community I ask:

How do I stop this damn dog from pissing everywhere?!?
 

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This is not a dominance issue, this is was more than a few instances of marking. The dog may have been housetrained elsewhere but this has not carried to this house. The owner needs to start housetraing from scratch, there is a great how to in the housetraing section.
 

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agree with Chas.
about the pee pressure belt. is it a normal belly band (a normal belly band wraps around the lower body and boy doggy bits) but you don't just wrap the band alone around. you stick a feminine pad inside the band and the pad will absorb the pee and it should not leak at all. My Baloo's facial expression was absolutely priceless when he lifted his leg the first time with the band on and the spot he aimed for stayed dry :rofl:
 

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I would have your roommate bring the dog to the vet to rule out a UTI or other physical issue.
^ That should always be the first step whenever a dog suddenly starts peeing indoors.

That said, with a lot of dogs training is situational. Their rules are very specific instead of being generalities. So, the roommate's dog may have learned that peeing indoors is not allowed at their earlier home, but doesn't know that the rule extends to all homes. Just like a dog can learn that it needs to sit/stay when you say so, but obeying those commands doesn't extend to other people.

Once the vet rules out a UTI, the next step is to repeat housetraining from scratch. Reinforce the training with your dog as well, otherwise he may decide that he needs to start marking indoors.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
First off, thanks everyone! Small sample size, but it appears everyone in this thread tends to agree that Milo needs to be re-housebroken in this new setting. Definitely a challenge, but if it saves rewashing my sheets and rugs every other day, totally worth it.

That said, new question. When I housebroke Annabelle (my dog), I did so with a combination of crate training and discipline. She never peed in her crate. When she peed in the house, I would put her nose near the accident, knock her (barely) with an open newspaper, and tell her she was a bad dog in a stern voice. Then I would sop up the pee in a paper towel, take it outside, and put her nose next to it again, only this time telling her she was a "good girl" and giving her a treat. It worked; she actually housebroke in less than two weeks, which was much better than other dogs I've owned.

Milo, on the other hand, gets very vicious when I put his nose near his own pee. He tries (and on some occasions has managed to) bite me. It doesn't hurt much, but his reaction is very fierce. I'd love to catch him in the act, but that opportunity hasn't presented itself because he's very sneaky.

Given his attitude, what's the best way to retrain a new dog that has the tendencies to be nasty like that?

(Also, no UTI. He just came back from the vet last week with a clean bill. This is solely a pee problem, and one that I don't know how to solve.)
 

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Check out the Housetraining sticky in this forum: http://www.dogforum.com/housetraining/house-training-how-tos-2135/

Rubbing the dog's nose in his mess and physical discipline with newspaper used to be a popular way of housebreaking, but it's really not necessary and risks doing more harm than good. Physical discipline isn't necessary for housebreaking or any kind of training at all. Much more is known about dog behavior and the dominance theory is kinda out the window at this point, too. You and Milo both have lots of learning to do. ;)

Keep him in a crate small enough that he can't mess in one end and sleep in the other, take him outside frequently, big praise and rewards when he goes to the bathroom outside. Keep him near you, at least baby gated in the same room, so you can keep an eye on him at all times. If he makes a mess inside, back into the crate he goes and you simply clean up the mess. Taking some urine soaked paper towels outside and putting them where you want him to go to the bathroom might be a good idea, but no need to force his nose down to them. Dogs' noses are way better than ours. He'll be able to smell it just fine. :)
 
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