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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A bit dramatic of a title, but not wrong.
But, you get pictures. :D
Warning: rambling ahead.

So, just over a month ago, I brought home my new pup. Or, my gremlin, I believe would be better.馃槢 I've been planning for this girl for 2+ years. Painstakingly looked for, found, and investigated a breeder (1+ year), and put in the work so I could cut back on work and be with her pretty much all day, every day, until late January. Which, in hindsight, may be a factor with the blues.

Objectively, she's typical puppy and great. Doing pretty well on not biting or nipping. Is mostly potty-trained, not calling it until we're at least a month accident-free. Offers sits, soft eye contact, loose leash walks 95% of the time, bounces back in seconds from surprising things, is great with body handling, bathing, isn't bothered by sunglasses, hats, fireworks, thunderstorms, etc. etc. She naps like a normal puppy, my others never were really normal like that. Is doing very well with socialization. Objectively, she's great and I know I lucked out with her. Yet I still struggle.

The first 3 weeks, I vowed I was taking her back to the breeders at least twice a day. This has improved, so there is that. But, I'm just not clicking with her now that she's home. And I can't shake the blues fully right now.

And that frustrates me. My best dog (ghost 1), the one that both changed and saved my life, didn't give a lick about my existence unless I had food, was training, or playing; for the first 6 months. She spent those initial months trying to escape every day. And every day I was modifying our fence. She skinned off about a square inch of skin off my cousin her second day home. She became an absolutely phenomenal, bomb-proof, dog I adored.

Ghost 2; well, life with her was a saga. I was her 3rd owner at 10 weeks, was most likely a mill dog, had no bite inhibition, even setting a timer to take her out every 1.5-2 hours at night didn't stop her from messing in her crate. For the first 2 weeks, she had no understanding that water came in a bowl. She had frequent seizures, and different kinds of seizures, that threw her behavior all over the map, intense resource guarding, and probably idiopathic aggression (long, multiple vets saga). My initial attempts to get help for her was brushed off and trivialized by vets, trainers, and behaviorists until it was pretty much too late. I had to be at work at 5 AM every day. And so much more. All this to say, life with her was extremely challenging to the point that saying that feels like an understatement.

So, I don't understand why I get so much more easily frustrated with my new pup. Why I've got the blues when I've done harder.

But, next week I'm out of town and the breeders will be puppy-sitting and when she gets back we start classes. And I only think about taking her back about once every other day. So I feel tentatively hopefull this will help me shake the blues.

Now, those promised pictures. And fun, what breed is she? 馃槣



Dog Sports equipment Ball Plant Carnivore
Dog Liver Working animal Carnivore Whiskers
Dog Toy Fawn Wood Carnivore
 

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My best dog (ghost 1), the one that both changed and saved my life, didn't give a lick about my existence unless I had food, was training, or playing; for the first 6 months.
I am quoting this from you because sometimes it goes the opposite way. sometimes you don't think you are bonding with a dog or it might not work out and then it happens when you were not noticing. I think you just need to give this a little time and it will turn out you have a magnificent Australian Shepherd (that's my guess on her breed).

One of my dogs, when I got him at the age of 2 years, wanted nothing to do with me at all, not even with food. He had bonded to his foster mom and never wanted to leave her. His reticence fed mine and we had quite a time of it for the first few weeks. And then the light went off for both of us and we were very tightly bonded for the next 15 years.

Take heart.....it'll be all right.
 

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It's not a mix right? I mean, my first guess was and English Shepherd...not quite right, but then looking at the other breeds suggested (good guesses BTW!) didn't exactly match either...

Please enlighten us!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
She is... an Aussie.

For those that guessed otherwise (@JoanneF and @BigBlackDog), while she does have showlines, those are dual working-showing lines, emphasis on working ability and utility.

She just might show up as a teenager JoanneF. :p

@Madra Anamchara, you were and are right. Thank you. I'll try to slow my roll and let it be what'll it'll be.
 

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Firstly, congrats on your new puppy, she is a real cutie!

So, I don't understand why I get so much more easily frustrated with my new pup. Why I've got the blues when I've done harder.
Keep in mind that when we get a puppy, it is life changing, a big adjustment, not just for them, but for us as well. It can be a difficult transition from sharing our life with adult dogs, even those who have needed more from us than the average dog, to sharing our life with a totally dependent, high energy puppy who needs our attention every moment they are awake (pretty much) and has so much to learn - it is hard work and indeed, at times - frustrating!

Go easy on yourself, be kind to yourself, it takes time to adjust and to build the kind of relationship we want to have with our dogs, and sometimes it takes a bit of a different path than it did with other dogs we have shared our life with- but it will happen! Sometimes we just need to take a moment, especially when things get tough, to 'just breathe' and 'believe' that it will all work out!
 

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Firstly, congrats on your new puppy, she is a real cutie!



Keep in mind that when we get a puppy, it is life changing, a big adjustment, not just for them, but for us as well. It can be a difficult transition from sharing our life with adult dogs, even those who have needed more from us than the average dog, to sharing our life with a totally dependent, high energy puppy who needs our attention every moment they are awake (pretty much) and has so much to learn - it is hard work and indeed, at times - frustrating!

Go easy on yourself, be kind to yourself, it takes time to adjust and to build the kind of relationship we want to have with our dogs, and sometimes it takes a bit of a different path than it did with other dogs we have shared our life with- but it will happen! Sometimes we just need to take a moment, especially when things get tough, to 'just breathe' and 'believe' that it will all work out!
In addition, just keep in mind that our patience gets thinner as the years go by, and none of us are
getting any younger...:rolleyes:
 

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Well, I tell you what. If she's too much for you, you could as Joanne suggested put a stamp on her and send her to one of us! (like me!) I think she's adorable! :love: 馃槃
 

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Things will work out!
what I have found, having shared with multiple dogs over the years, is that 'you may not get the dog you thought you wanted, but you do get the dog you need, (and who needs you as much as you need them).
Hang in there, it will get better!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A rambling update ;)

So, when I dropped her off at the breeders, I was worried about how our bond that we do have would change. While I think I offer a pretty good life, the breeders have more people/bigger family, dog-savvy canine relatives, ranch hustle and smells, and as it turned out, her visit overlapped with several of her siblings who where there for various reasons. Her mom was thrilled to see her, and she had a great time.

Coming home, she was happy and confident. Wiggled seeing the Forbidden Shoes and The Corner of the carpet. The corner I have to enforce "leave it" all day every day from the first day. I have no idea why she fixates on it other than two loose threads that I keep trimming flat but I digress.

And our bond...nothing really changed. She has a couple times come up and leaned against me or rested her chin in my hand or on my shoulder. But nothing very different either way. Apparently she is more assured about her place and our bond than I. But life and time goes on.

Anyway, she hit a major growth spurt and I can hardly believe it.
Dog Furniture Dog breed Comfort Liver


And a flash from the (not so distant) past
Head Wood Mammal Flooring Floor
 

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They do grow up so fast!!

Sometimes it is 'love at first sight', other times the bond is like a garden - you plant the seeds, nurture them carefully and in time, they will grow!
 
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She looks pretty distinctly Aussie to me.

I've only felt an immediate bond with 2 puppies, and that's over more that 50 years of dog owning. For most of them it came when I trained, not just puppy things, but training for competition. That's different for everyone, of course. I realize the majority of dog owners never do that at all.

It's even different for me from dog to dog -- one hooked me forever at 8 weeks when we spent our first night together in a motel room. I'd flown to get her, and we stayed in an airport motel. Her ghost still has me and always will, but that doesn't mean I didn't develop strong feelings for the dog that came after her. For that matter the guy I have now has almost got me as hard.

Maybe you just want difficult dogs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I find comfort in that it isn't always "at first sight" but still strong, or that those who took time weren't loved or bonded with.

Maybe you just want difficult dogs?
Lol, certainly not. Probably more of an unresolved savior complex and lots of childhood ghosts. Which is why I got this pup. A snap *knock on wood as far as herding breed puppies- *edit or just about any on second thought- go. Now if only I could get my feelings as I want them. Or maybe learn to leave them alone, idk.

Tonight we shall try learning written cue cards or the names of toys. We'll see how that goes.
 
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