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For leaving him, I recommend using something called the Flitting Game first, it is descringed about ⅔ of the way down this page -


Then, once he is happy, you can build to leaving him for 10 minutes, 20, 40 and so on. But the key to avoiding separation anxiety is to always get back before he gets upset.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Great thanks! I am starting to do the Flitting Thing.. its working slowly, he is starting to get relaxed around us when we move around. Our boy has also learned how to "Stay" even when food is right in front of him! Its adorable coz his whole body twitches with desperation but he waits!

I think he has a major case of FOMO, coz even with me in the room, he throws a fit coz he desperately wants to go outside if he knows the maid or the cook is at home. Hopefully he calms down slowly.

We are also planning to slowly make him comfortable to sleep in the hall instead of with us in the bedroom. Its not even been 3 weeks yet that he has been home, do you think its too soon? We are not in a rush but the baby will be here by September 1st week & I want him to get accustomed to the idea of sleeping away from us.. Thoughts? It will be hard for both of us but i think it just wudnt be practical for the baby to be sleeping in the same room as Sam.
 

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Sounds good. For the sleeping, is he happily sleeping through the night? If so, you could start moving his bed, but do it in baby steps. Start with it still in your room but closer to the door for a few nights. Then just outside the door for a few nights and so on - if he gets unsettled at any stage, you have gone too fast, so repeat the previous step for a few more nights.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Yes, he has been silent though the night and seems comfortable in his bed. Will try moving his bed slowly.. thanks!
 

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Try this bed. It works very well for dogs with anxiety. thefloofdogbed.com This is where I got the bed!
I got one of these, it is absolutely rubbish. It is nothing like as deep as the picture makes it look. In fact, the filler is so thin, you can put a finger on it and touch right through to the floor. I had to stuff it with more cushion material to make it usable.

Don't waste your money.

@Stricklandg395 are you selling these by any chance?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Looks like an advert to me :)

We started moving Sam's bed slightly away from where we sleep, in the same room but closer to the door, he didnt seem to mind the movement, but once in a while in the night we notice that he comes n sleeps right at the foot of our bed sometime during the night. He's growing up fast!

Totally struggling with Potty training, trying to get him to go to our balcony but he doesnt seem to have registered the place. We changed our spot 2 times and confused the poor kid.. any tips? Unlearning bit is the hardest i guess & thats what we need to make him do..

We are also starting to leave him alone time and again. Went out for an hour the other day and when we came back he was okay, he would have cried but more or less was sleepy so maybe didnt register.
 

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Some dogs are just a little slower than others at toilet training, it can take time.

Toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

Ideally you want him to not be in a position where he needs to toilet before you have him out on the balcony, so that every toilet is outside - as far as possible, there will be accidents! So set him up to succeed by taking him out even more than he needs; for example every 45 minutes to an hour and always after sleeping, eating, playing. The time between a puppy realising they need to toilet, and being unable to hold that toilet, is zero. So your aim is to have him outside before he can't help himself. When he toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward him with a high value treat. Do that immediately, don't make him come to you for the treat so he is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that he eventually wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until he is outside - once he is physically able to control his toileting obviously. As he is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words he can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when he is reliably trained you can use these to tell him when you want him to toilet.

If you take him out there and he doesn't toilet after five minutes, bring him in but don't take your eyes off him. Any hint of a toilet inside, scoop him up and get him out fast. If he doesn't try to toilet indoors (great!) take him out a second time and repeat until you do get outside toilets. You need the outside toilet to happen SO that you can reward SO that he learns.

If he has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed he may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if he needs to toilet (by going off and toileting out of sight) - the opposite of what you want. Dogs cant make the distinction between you being annoyed at him TOILETING, as opposed to toileting INDOORS. Take a rolled up newspaper and hit yourself over the head for not having taken him outside in time. Not when he is there though in case you scare him. Then clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract him back to the spot.

Indoors if you see him circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get him out fast.

Overnight he is unlikely to be able to control his toilet as his little bladder and bowel are underdeveloped and not strong enough to hold all night so set your alarm to take him out at least once if not twice during the night.

And keep going with the flitting game!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thanks for a prompt response as always, Joanne :) Will try and keep you updated. We tried crate training him but i think he gets too scared and ends up peeing in the crate so we just keep it open and let him walk in and out whenever he pleases. But he doesnt associate that as a place where he shud be going to rest.. so that leads to him peeing in it.
 

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What are the circumstances that might have started him peeing in there? And when does he do it?

I'm wondering if he has learned to associate the crate with being a place to toilet, so if it is a regular, favourite place, whether putting the crate on the balcony might help?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Yeah that was my thought too. But its not become a trend yet, so waiting for a few more instances else I'll put it there. I think the first few times he peeed was because he was scared, we usually dont lock the crate more than 15-20 mins at a time but he isnt used to it yet. But today I noticed once he went and voluntarily peed in it. So if it happens again a few more times, i'll put it out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Only if I lock it, else he goes in happily and sits himself. even a few times after being locked in, he goes in so its not like hez scared of the crate but yeah when its locked, he cries for attention. even if we are around.
 

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If he is crying, it isn't the happy place you want it to be.

This is a long read but it is the best guide to crate training I know of. It was written by Emma Judson who is a behaviourist who specialises in separation anxiety.


If he is unhappy in the crate,would a puppy pen be a possible alternative ?
 
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