Dog Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

My husband and I got home a 7 week old Beagle puppy last week. He is now 8 weeks old and has spent about 8-9 days with us at our place. Thanks to COVID, we are both constantly home so have not left him alone yet and trying to give him a secure environment where he can feel safe and loved. He seems to be getting used to us but from a lot of advise from seasoned folks, we tried to leave him alone in the room today for 10 mins, he whined for a bit but settled post that. Then in a few hours we did it again for about 10-15 mins coz we had some workers at our place & he was very excited about other humans in the house. He whined again for a few mins. We waited for him to stop whining & then went in. When we went back in, he wasnt particularly crazy excited about us and looked quite sad. It could be my anxiety talking of being a new pet parent but is this normal? He didnt jump or get exicted to see us but looked sad & sleepy and went and slept near his bed when we entered the room. Any thoughts or suggestions?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
I suspect he is more confused.

Actually, the idea of leaving a puppy to whine is a bit out of date. This article explains why.


Rather than leaving him and going back when he stops crying, the Flitting Game described about ⅔ of the way down this article is a good way of teaching independence without stressing him.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks so much for your quick reply! This is indeed very different from whatever I have read before.

Also quick update for you, once he woke up, he seemed his normal self. Maybe he was just sleepy? He was playing as usual and walking around us as he usually does. I am hoping we do right by him and not hurt him emotionally!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
This is indeed very different from whatever I have read before.

There is quite a lot of information around that is out of date, understanding of canine psychology has developed a lot in the last few years.

Modern, force free training is based on guiding the dog to good choices and rewarding, and is found to be far more effective than allowing a dog to make a mistake then punishing after it - which makes a lot of sense when you think about it.

Please do ask if you have any more questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You can be sure that I will be active member here :) We are desperately trying to make sure that we do the little one justice & he finds a good home. Any initial tips to manage a boy Beagle?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
For anything in particular? Housetraining, recall, walking nicely?

You could also see if there is anything in our training resources that might help.


I am a big fan of Kikopup who does short training videos on YouTube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Currently we are trying to get him to respond to his name.. I have heard that Beagles are generally harder to train as they go where their nose takes them..

For now, he sits as we feed him and is a fairly quiet dog. How would you recommend us to get him to respond as we call his name? We repeat it while we give him food.. sometimes he responds, mostly it doesnt though.

Will also go through the material you shared, thanks!!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Beagles can certainly be more challenging to train recall, you are right about the scent thing.

And teaching him his name is a good start, I would do it the same way.

Tagging @Mad Murphy who may be able to chip in - she is a long term beagle owner!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Hi there,, yes I am a beagle owner past and present and I have the grey hair to prove it.

Beagles are hunting dogs.. that is ther lust and main drive in life. However they are the most affectionate gentle souls you will find. They are pack animals and do better with other dogs cats or people to snuggle up to and they are very vocal. Their voices have a huge range and depth , they are also very loud.

They will jump through hoops of fire for a treat so food is your friend. But dont overfeed I could cry at the amount of barrel shaped beagles I see on a daily basis. Its so bad some beagle groups have a no fat shaming rule..

But as a balanced training treat its great.
George came to us a year ago with no training at all he now responds very well to his name and in the doggy playground where he is allowed off lead he will return. However if he has the scent of something outside there is no stopping him he will track it to the end of the earth. Because of this we have an anti escape harness and a strong lead and he is never off lead in the parks or counrtyside.

Weve also taught him the 'look at me' command to distract him from other dogs and people because he barks for attention this way his attention is on me and he knows if he doesnt bark he gets the treat.

gentle training with lots of rewards is the best way to get a beagle to respond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thats so lovely to hear! I cant wait for this little guy to grow up and respond well. We stay in an apartment, and as expected he sniffs all day! He has not taken too much fancy to his toys but when we play with him, he enjoys the game of tug.
I am obsessed with studying his behaviour and i think becaus of that, putting a lot of pressure on myself. I guess consistency and patience will be key.
So far the good things are, he comes n sleeps close to us when me or my husband are working or cooking.. in the night he is smart and knows when the lights are out, not to whine or cry, he happily settles in his bed and sleeps.

We got a dog trainer over yesterday and he explained the need for us to be the alpha. While my husband has established that, i have not been able to yet. He nips and playbites me a lot more than he does with my husband.. but if i distract him with a toy, he doesnt continue to go for my skin.. its just an invitation to play. But i am worried that if i dont control him now, he will continue to be more hyper with me and i may lose control of him. I am also 6 months pregnant so my movement will be slightly slower soon.. (i hope not, but i am guessing it will be).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
No no no ditch that trainer . Being alpha has been de bunked as hogwash and you could easily shut down a sensitive dog such as a beagle with this approach... Please please only positive reinforcement training..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yeah I attempted it today & only felt horrible about it. He looked a little confused why I am behaving suddenly so different. But how do i positively get him to stop nipping? he will naturally get over it with time and i keep treating him for good behaviour?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Definitely ignore that trainer, the alpha theory was simply wrong.

The pack leadership theory has been thoroughly disproven and widely discredited, even by the person who developed it. It was based on flawed conclusions drawn from poorly observed evidence. The wolf pack (and dogs are not wolves anyway, any more than we are chimpanzees) was not a real pack, and the situation (captivity rather than wild) skewed the data as their behaviour was not natural. In a true pack, the leadership is fluid depending on the circumstances.

This article explains it quite well. Debunking the "Alpha Dog" Theory - Whole Dog Journal

Equating pet dogs to wolves in captivity is the equivalent of observing high security criminals in prison and extrapolating the evidence to teach people how to raise babies!

Nobody disagrees with boundaries and good manners, but the these can be established through training, building a mutually respectful relationship and without forcing submission from your dog. We certainly do not advocate aversive tools and behaviours.

If you think about leadership in your own life, the leaders (teachers , co-workers) that you respect earn that respect and inspire followership, they don't command or force it through wielding power 'just because they can'.

Now, onto the biting.
He isn't being aggressive. This is just an extension of the boisterous play he had with his littermates but he needs to learn this is not how to play with humans. Some people find a sharp 'ouch' works but it can just ramp up the excitement. Some people find putting a toy in the dog's mouth works, others find the puppy is still more interested in nipping hands. My preferred method is to teach him that teeth on skin equals end of fun. So as soon as he makes contact, walk out of the room for a few moments. As long as the whole family is consistent - do it immediately and do it every time - he will learn. You could use a house line to draw him away, which keeps your hands both out of reach and also keeps hands for only good things.

There is also something called ”extinction burst” that you should be aware of. This is when a behaviour that used to get attention no longer works for the dog so he tries it all the harder and it seems like things are getting worse, not better. This is good, because it means that what you are doing is starting to work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hi All,

My husband and I got home a 7 week old Beagle puppy last week. He is now 8 weeks old and has spent about 8-9 days with us at our place. Thanks to COVID, we are both constantly home so have not left him alone yet and trying to give him a secure environment where he can feel safe and loved. He seems to be getting used to us but from a lot of advise from seasoned folks, we tried to leave him alone in the room today for 10 mins, he whined for a bit but settled post that. Then in a few hours we did it again for about 10-15 mins coz we had some workers at our place & he was very excited about other humans in the house. He whined again for a few mins. We waited for him to stop whining & then went in. When we went back in, he wasnt particularly crazy excited about us and looked quite sad. It could be my anxiety talking of being a new pet parent but is this normal? He didnt jump or get exicted to see us but looked sad & sleepy and went and slept near his bed when we entered the room. Any thoughts or suggestions?
Our dog will literally turn his back on you and won’t acknowledge you for a few minutes when we do something he does not approve of. Cold as can be. If you call him in that mood he walks away. I have had several dogs in my 63 years. This one takes the cake. Maltipoo. If you scold him, you will find a pile or puddle somewhere in the house in 10-15 Min. He is 9 yrs old and house broken. I have met my match with him. I do not scold if I do not catch him in the act. He has gotten caught a few times, but escaped plenty of times. Have patience! Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Given that Beagles are so ruled by their nose ( and stomach but that’s not my point) your puppy might enjoy hide and seek games in the apartment. I buy a few soft toys with no buttons from the charity shop then sprinkle them with vanilla essence and hide them in a box, towel etc. the vanilla leaves a brown mark but it washes out easily. It might give you an alternative to using food all the time and can keep his little mind active.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
the vanilla leaves a brown mark but it washes out easily.
As an alternative to something that leaves a mark, you can get some pieces of cloth and put them in a jar with some cloves to get them to smell.

Then, for the next few days, hide pieces of food. When your dog finds them, he can have the food and you reward with another piece.

When the cloth is ready, hide those, with a piece of food. Your dog should find the food and by default, the cloth. Keep rewarding with another piece of food.

Then after a few days of that, hide just the pieces of cloth. When your dog finds these, you can reward with a piece of food.

I still realise that is food, but he's 'working' for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
These are excellent suggestions guys! I so appreciate your inputs. I am in a much better place mentally & feel like im getting a hand of things. He is also settling down with us.
  • For the biting piece, it works most of the times if i say NO sternly and break eye contact. (never did use the method of giving a quick hit on the neck as my trainer advised. I guess his logic was to mimic what an elder dog would do). He settles down in a bit, if he is too hyper i just get him to run around so his focus moves from the biting.
  • He does have a good temperament overall and has already learnt how to sit and stay for food, even when it is kept in front of him. Hope thats good progress!
I will definitely try the treasure hunt thing so that he keeps busy in the house when we work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Our dog will literally turn his back on you and won’t acknowledge you for a few minutes when we do something he does not approve of. Cold as can be. If you call him in that mood he walks away. I have had several dogs in my 63 years. This one takes the cake. Maltipoo. If you scold him, you will find a pile or puddle somewhere in the house in 10-15 Min. He is 9 yrs old and house broken. I have met my match with him. I do not scold if I do not catch him in the act. He has gotten caught a few times, but escaped plenty of times. Have patience! Good luck!
Thank you so much, and your dog seems lovely & sassy! Lol, good luck to you too!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
  • For the biting piece, it works most of the times if i say NO sternly and break eye contact. (never did use the method of giving a quick hit on the neck as my trainer advised. I guess his logic was to mimic what an elder dog would do).
Sounds like things are going well - just a couple of things I'd like to chip in with from the paragraph above.

Saying NO can interrupt a behaviour, and that is fine as far as it goes, but it is only another sound to the dog - so, two things from that; first he may not know which of his behaviours you don't want - at any given time he will be doing lots of things simultaneously like playing, watching, listening, nipping, sniffing, learning, tasting etc. And that leads to the second point - it is far easier for him if you tell him what you do want instead. So when he is doing something you dont like, for example jumping up, ask for an alternative and incompatible behaviour like a sit - he cannot jump and sit at the same time.

Now, I realise that isn't what we suggest about walking out if he starts mouthing but in that particular behaviour it is easier for him to get the message if you just step immediately away.

The other thing that I wanted to raise was about your trainer behaving like he or she was a dog. In the first place, that advice is terrible, your dog is trying to engage with you - you really, really don't want to stop that, you just want a different type of engagement. So please don't hit him - would you hit a child that was trying to play? Because that is, in effect what he is suggesting. And a mother dog wouldn't do that in any case, and - big revelation - your dog knows you are not his mother.

Honestly, your trainer has not kept his knowledge up to date, please, please don't follow his advice if you want a good relationship with your dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Got it. We are only using the No command when he is trying to nip at us and not anywhere else.
When he starts to bite some other furniture or mat, we just distract him with a toy.

And I do agree with you on the trainer's advise. Especically coz I will be unable to make it work, I cannot hit a puppy & dont want to. He did tell us abt the eye contact break which seemed to calm him down so we are taking his input selectively.

How do you propose we start leaving him alone slowly? Currently both of us are available through the day in the house but when my cook comes, he gets super excited and doesnt let her work, so we take him to the balcony.. he plays for a bit but mostly just wants to come back inside coz hes so excited about the new human at home! Whines and cries and presses against the door..
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top