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Hello, dog lovers.. In about a year i would like to buy a dog (my first dog, i had one but i was 8 years old just a kid now i am 18 i will be 19 when i will intend to buy it). Well, the problem is that I am living in an apartment with my mother and my little sister. I know that GSD have 2 lines, pet line and working line, i would like to buy a pet line(about this if you can tell me how can i know if he is pet or working line it will be awesome). My apartment is like this 2 bedrooms(3.2 meters lenght and 3.2 meters width).One hall/lobby (6 meters lenght 1 meter width), one dining room/living room ( almost 6 meters on lenght and 3.5 on width) + one kitchen and one bathroom (i can provide images with my apartment). My question is that if i will be able to raise a german shepherd in this apartment? Next year i will finish the high school and i dont have plans for college at the moment because i am working as a 3d artist right now beside high school, so i think with my mothers help and sister i can take him out and play with him day by day.As i read on internet you will need 2 hours of exercises/day. Forgot to say that i have carpets in every room without hall and kitchen. So ffs..no pee on my carpet :)) joking ik if that i will buy a dog about 2-3 months he will pee on my carpet my mom will yell at me and i will clean it. So what is your opinion? I know that bullmastiffs, greyhounds are for apartment but this is my dream dog (im kind of passionate about war special forces world wars, in every documentary, movie i watched i saw this dog and i felt in love with him.Another alternative would be the labrador but i dont know about that.
 

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I know people may disagree with me but I don't believe you should have a GSD in an apartment. Also, no disrespect, but I also don't think that you're ready to be a dog owner since you don't yet know what your plans are. At your age work, school and social commitments are probably such that you might not have a lot of free time to spend with a dog. Maybe instead of a GSD puppy that will require a major commitment of time and expense, you could consider an older dog that is already trained. Its advisable for GSDs to be enrolled in obedience classes. Is that something that you've taken into consideration?
 

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Well, the plans are after i finish the high school to work as a freelancer or at my friend's company as a 3ds artist from home thats why i said because i can take like 2h/day to take care of him + my mother my sister, etc.The older dog thing, i dont know i am so scared of the transition what you mean by old? You know about that old "parents" to me the new "parent" maybe he will not agree you know?
 

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Well, the plans are after i finish the high school to work as a freelancer or at my friend's company as a 3ds artist from home thats why i said because i can take like 2h/day to take care of him + my mother my sister, etc.The older dog thing, i dont know i am so scared of the transition what you mean by old? You know about that old "parents" to me the new "parent" maybe he will not agree you know?
LOL Old, meaning not a puppy - a dog that is already housebroken, done teething, etc. Those are the most stressful and difficult times in pet ownership, so if one is in "transition," its sometimes difficult to stay on a strict schedule, which is required when one gets a new puppy. :)
 

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One of my best dogs was an older dog that I adopted. And yes I was young and living in an apartment. She was so easy! Housetrained, no nipping. And I could see her personality before I took her (mellow) Puppies are a lot of work! Good luck
 

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Hello, dog lovers.. In about a year i would like to buy a dog (my first dog, i had one but i was 8 years old just a kid now i am 18 i will be 19 when i will intend to buy it). Well, the problem is that I am living in an apartment with my mother and my little sister. I know that GSD have 2 lines, pet line and working line, i would like to buy a pet line(about this if you can tell me how can i know if he is pet or working line it will be awesome). My apartment is like this 2 bedrooms(3.2 meters lenght and 3.2 meters width).One hall/lobby (6 meters lenght 1 meter width), one dining room/living room ( almost 6 meters on lenght and 3.5 on width) + one kitchen and one bathroom (i can provide images with my apartment). My question is that if i will be able to raise a german shepherd in this apartment? Next year i will finish the high school and i dont have plans for college at the moment because i am working as a 3d artist right now beside high school, so i think with my mothers help and sister i can take him out and play with him day by day.As i read on internet you will need 2 hours of exercises/day. Forgot to say that i have carpets in every room without hall and kitchen. So ffs..no pee on my carpet :)) joking ik if that i will buy a dog about 2-3 months he will pee on my carpet my mom will yell at me and i will clean it. So what is your opinion? I know that bullmastiffs, greyhounds are for apartment but this is my dream dog (im kind of passionate about war special forces world wars, in every documentary, movie i watched i saw this dog and i felt in love with him.Another alternative would be the labrador but i dont know about that.
The GSD is a big dog. Do you have anywhere you can walk it as much as it needs to be walked.
We walk our collie six to ten miles a day. Could you do that? If not, you might want to rething the breed/
 

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I agree, most GSD's are not great apartment dogs. They're big and need a lot of exercise. But beyond that, they're big barkers and very protective/territorial. Which does not usually work well in an apartment, because there's a lot of people passing by and neighbors to annoy with the barking. They also aren't great as a first dog. I would suggest getting any easier dog as a first dog, and one more suited to apartment living. It may be your dream dog, but it will be a lot more satisfying if you wait until it's a better time for it.
 

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I agree, most GSD's are not great apartment dogs. They're big and need a lot of exercise. But beyond that, they're big barkers and very protective/territorial. Which does not usually work well in an apartment, because there's a lot of people passing by and neighbors to annoy with the barking. They also aren't great as a first dog. I would suggest getting any easier dog as a first dog, and one more suited to apartment living. It may be your dream dog, but it will be a lot more satisfying if you wait until it's a better time for it.
Yes to the above but I wonder if Uvell will heed this?
Sometimes people get dogs as fashion accessories and possibly don't always understand the committment needed - especially with a big dog.
 

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I live in a tiny house (the size of some apartments), and have not much of a yard, so I face many of the same issues.
I've had a gsd (working line) and full-time job (then) and husband (still got im!). We dedicated our free time to that dog. She went everywhere with us, she got weekly dog classes, went into dog sport, took her to off-leash areas every single day to play frisbee and let her run free, plus two more short 'pottie' walks on a leash. I'd say that's the minimum you can get away with, with a medium drive working dog.
Pet lines? Have no clue. Depends on the parent dogs, I guess. Most likely you'll run into backyard breeders who have no clue, though, but if it's a complete couch potato, it's not really gsd in my book.
I had an awesome gsd/golden mix. He was beautiful, looked formidable, but very sweet and laidback easy dog. I got him at the dog pound at 4-6years old. Never got trained, never needed it. He probably would have made a great apartment dog too.

If you really want a gsd, I recommend a middle-aged adult dog that you fall in love with.

You will need one that is NOT reactive, that means, gets along with dogs and people, even strangers and at close quarters, because that is what will happen in an apartment. Dogs that don't like 'dogs in their face' won't be happy squishing past another dog in the hallway or elevator, and that's a common thing in shepherds, and not usually a problem, but would be for a newbie, and for living in an apartment. GSDs also trend to 'suspicious of strangers' and even fear aggression when poorly bred (bad nerves), and is thing you many run into if you go to backyard breeders (just a pet breeders).

How much exercise, where, how much? You're in an apartment; how often do you plan on taking the dog pottie? On leash exercise? How much, how often? Do you have access to off-leash areas? How much, how often? Cash for professional training, for how long? Dog sports? Informal dog sports (like frisbee)? etc. etc. etc.

Depending on those answers, an adult might be fine. Not even I have ever brought a puppy into my home--I can't meet their needs.
 

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^ This, this, this, and this.

Apartments are nightmares for dogs that don't really dig other dogs in their space. My Aussie could probably thrive in an apartment, my Border Collie would be in despair the whole time. Both were heavily socialized, introduced to all manner of people and dogs, it's just the way their personalities came through.

I would love @Artdog 's post if I could. Acknowledging that a puppy is just not a good fit for their lifestyle, and choosing to go for an older dog instead.
 

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I live in a tiny house (the size of some apartments), and have not much of a yard, so I face many of the same issues.
I've had a gsd (working line) and full-time job (then) and husband (still got im!). We dedicated our free time to that dog. She went everywhere with us, she got weekly dog classes, went into dog sport, took her to off-leash areas every single day to play frisbee and let her run free, plus two more short 'pottie' walks on a leash. I'd say that's the minimum you can get away with, with a medium drive working dog.
Pet lines? Have no clue. Depends on the parent dogs, I guess. Most likely you'll run into backyard breeders who have no clue, though, but if it's a complete couch potato, it's not really gsd in my book.
I had an awesome gsd/golden mix. He was beautiful, looked formidable, but very sweet and laidback easy dog. I got him at the dog pound at 4-6years old. Never got trained, never needed it. He probably would have made a great apartment dog too.

If you really want a gsd, I recommend a middle-aged adult dog that you fall in love with.

You will need one that is NOT reactive, that means, gets along with dogs and people, even strangers and at close quarters, because that is what will happen in an apartment. Dogs that don't like 'dogs in their face' won't be happy squishing past another dog in the hallway or elevator, and that's a common thing in shepherds, and not usually a problem, but would be for a newbie, and for living in an apartment. GSDs also trend to 'suspicious of strangers' and even fear aggression when poorly bred (bad nerves), and is thing you many run into if you go to backyard breeders (just a pet breeders).

How much exercise, where, how much? You're in an apartment; how often do you plan on taking the dog pottie? On leash exercise? How much, how often? Do you have access to off-leash areas? How much, how often? Cash for professional training, for how long? Dog sports? Informal dog sports (like frisbee)? etc. etc. etc.

Depending on those answers, an adult might be fine. Not even I have ever brought a puppy into my home--I can't meet their needs.
Well said. I think many dog owners, or would be dog owners, really comprehend the committment and responsibility it entails. At least to do it right.

Not just the time committment for exercise but the correct medication, shots, flea drops, insurance and these are recurring costs.
 

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Ofc i will heed, so i get it no GSD, what about a bullmastiff or a pitbull?
My first instinct was that this is a joke. These breeds, as the GSD, need plenty of room and are sometimes seen as "status" dogs. I think you'll find there are many dogs that are better suited to an apartment if you just do a little bit of research. My recommendation would be a dog that fully grown would be under 40 pounds.
 

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My first instinct was that this is a joke. These breeds, as the GSD, need plenty of room and are sometimes seen as "status" dogs. I think you'll find there are many dogs that are better suited to an apartment if you just do a little bit of research. My recommendation would be a dog that fully grown would be under 40 pounds.
Oh, if only....

when I was looking for my next dog (I look for young adults in need of homes) I found an endless supply of adolescent apartment raised huskies in need of good homes.

That said, I also hang out on a german shepherd forum, and there are a few members there that raised gsd's while in college and managed to get things right, so I take these questions seriously.

As an aside, my new guy is 38 lbs of crazy dog--decidedly not an apartment dog. He needs MORE exercise than my gsd ever did.
 

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Oh, if only....

when I was looking for my next dog (I look for young adults in need of homes) I found an endless supply of adolescent apartment raised huskies in need of good homes.

That said, I also hang out on a german shepherd forum, and there are a few members there that raised gsd's while in college and managed to get things right, so I take these questions seriously.

As an aside, my new guy is 38 lbs of crazy dog--decidedly not an apartment dog. He needs MORE exercise than my gsd ever did.
Dogs are as individual as people and the breed definitely doesn't determine what one can expect from the animal. The fact of the matter is that large dogs, by and large, do better with more room, especially if their owner will be away for long periods of time at work or school or both. No living thing wants to be cramped up in a confined space. If you live in an area that is large enough, look for a dog walker. Someone who could come over and give the dog a walk, play for a bit, give some clean water, etc., is ideal regardless of the breed. At one time, I decided I wanted to be a stay at home mom and thought it would be the perfect time to get my first GSD as a grown up, separate and apart from the ones we had as kids. The dog was beautiful. Amazing. Majestic. Everything we love GSDs for. After I got the kids off to school, I spent hours upon hours walking him, playing with him, grooming him and training him. He understood commands in English and German and there were several commands I could give just by pointing. Unfortunately, after a couple of years, I had to go back to work. For a while, we had a walker come to the house for a couple of hours a day but eventually, he got bored and started eating my kitchen. So you see, it just depends - on a multitude of factors. If he had been an older dog, I think it would have worked out. I was lucky enough to rehome him with a family that I knew who already had a GSD so he wasn't lonely any more, but man I miss him.
 

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GSD in an apartment.

It's not ideal, but it can work. What people need to realize that just because you have a big yard doesn't mean you can stick the dog out there and think you have done your job.

A GSD will need some serious exercise both mentally and physically. This can be accomplished by apartment dwellers if they work at it. For starters I would recommend biking with your GSD running along side you at least once a day for at least 30 minutes, in addition to a 30 minute regular walk. Second, going to a park of some sort at least once a week for less structured play. Third, training, constantly training new things even simple silly tricks gives needed mental exercise.

Finally, you'll have to look at the layout of your apartment. The dog needs to be able to get around easily, this means keeping clutter to a minimum and generally being light on furniture and keeping it to the sides of the room.
 

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GSD Lines

There are two lines. They are WORKING and SHOW.

You can identify a working line because the person will talk about the parents and/or grandparents having 'titled in Schutzhund' or French Ring or Mondo or other dog sports, or will say they provide dogs to the police/military. You are right that you should avoid working lines.

The second line is SHOW. This is best thought of as being divided into two categories, active and inactive. Active show lines are dogs which are being bred to compete in the show ring as it exists today. They will have parents, or grandparents or great grandparents who have some sort of show title. Thing is, the dogs that are winning in today's show ring are health disasters. Stay away, far away.

That leaves what I call inactive show lines. These are generally dogs that are registered with the AKC but the owners aren't showing the dogs. But they aren't just breeding AKC dogs to claim they are purebred, they have a goal and they breed towards that goal. Commonly those goals are to emulate the dogs of the 1950s before show lines got ruined. Sometimes this is breeding for calm temperament. Whatever, they will have some goal and they will be up front about it. (People breeding non-snow AKC dogs when asked will often be able to parrot a response that sounds decent so look for people who are saying their goals without prompting). These people will also have done health tests on their dogs, especially the hips.

Other breeders to avoid.

Puppy Mills.

These guys churn out 'purebred' AKC dogs by keeping the mom in a small cage and constantly breeding with no health tests. They sell to people who think 'purebred' means quality, which it does not. Puppy mill dogs are found at pet stores. Any place that has many breeds of dogs available, they are probably getting them from puppy mills. 'Rescue' organizations that have a lot of puppies are often fronts for puppy mills.

Back Yard Breeders.

These are people that have a dog that is clearly of a specific breed, but it may not have papers. They look for an easily accessible dog of the opposite sex to make puppies with the goal of selling for a profit. They don't have a goal, they don't try and choose a good pairing for their dog, just any that are convenient.
 

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GSD in an apartment.

It's not ideal, but it can work. What people need to realize that just because you have a big yard doesn't mean you can stick the dog out there and think you have done your job.

A GSD will need some serious exercise both mentally and physically. This can be accomplished by apartment dwellers if they work at it. For starters I would recommend biking with your GSD running along side you at least once a day for at least 30 minutes, in addition to a 30 minute regular walk. Second, going to a park of some sort at least once a week for less structured play. Third, training, constantly training new things even simple silly tricks gives needed mental exercise.

Finally, you'll have to look at the layout of your apartment. The dog needs to be able to get around easily, this means keeping clutter to a minimum and generally being light on furniture and keeping it to the sides of the room.
Quoting my own message because I can't edit.

Someone else mentioned there seems to be a lot of young adult huskies that were the pets of college age people with apartments that just didn't work out. Just getting your footing in the world is hard, and handling a dog at the same time can be tricky. People with all sizes of dogs fail at this, it's just that smaller dogs are easier to 'control' so it is less apparent what a disaster it is becoming. Regardless of size, getting a dog as you are just going out on your own is unadvisable.

BUT some people choose to live in apartments for a variety of reasons, at a variety of stages in their lives. An apartment doesn't mean you can't have a big dog IF YOU TAKE THE EXTRA STEPS
 
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