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I currently have a 17 pound terrier mix (looks like a rat or smooth fox terrier) he is around 7 years old and has been fine with other dogs. We decided to get another rescue dog. The dog is a retriever/collie mix who is 45 pounds. We got a girl because we've heard boy and girl pairs work best. Now to the problem.
Since getting the girl yesterday there have been two brawls today :dog-mad: and zero yesterday.
The first time we were about to go for a walk as I went to go grab my terrier's harness, my terrier walked towards the door and turned toward the stair and out of no where she attacked him. The rug by the door she has recently been using as a bed instead of her actual bed (don't know if this is important or not).
The second brawl I was playing upstairs with the dogs. I was using the little laser light and the collie was chasing the laser and was having fun. My other dog was on the other side of the room so I flashed the laser by him. He started chasing it and she was also chasing the laser. They were both chasing it when she attacked him again.
What can I do to stop this? I don't want to have to return my new dog to the rescue. :(
 

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Update: I took away toys, blankets, and beds except for the one's in their crates. My terrier is scared when she is around (slow, shaking, nervous) and she is acting as if nothing happened.
 

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If she's resource guarding toys, and sleeping areas then you are going to have to pick up anything, and everything that she considers valuable, and that will likely include food, treats, and chews. I'd also NEVER leave them alone together even if it's just for a couple of minutes. She's double his size and if she chooses to she can seriously hurt him and it will take her less then a minute to do it.

If you're boy cannot bounce back from those two attacks and stop being terrified of her (shaking is a sign that he is very, very, scared) then you have to ask yourself is it fair to him to be forced to live with her. In his mind he's done nothing to deserve those attacks and from what you wrote she's not giving him a fair warning. If she was she would be growling, stiffening up, lowering her head, and giving a hard stare. What she's doing would be like you stepping on someone's grass and they run up to you and punch you in the face, knock you down, and keep hitting you, all without even hollering at you to get off the grass.

If she's resource guarding then it can be worked with, but it can take quite awhile. While you are working on it you need to keep her from practicing the behavior and should never reprimand her for it. Reprimands, claiming what she's guarding, etc, teach her that she's right to be fearful of people and animals around her stuff because they either punish her while she has it or steal it from her.

Here's a thread that will help you work with her http://www.dogforum.com/training-be...guarding-causes-prevention-modification-7511/ Basically when she has her "treasure" great things, like high value treats, happen when you boy is around and only when he is around. While doing this you need to keep him safe, so start far enough away where she can see him but is not reacting negatively to him (you'll likely need either a helper or to have her tethered to something so if things go wrong and she goes into attack mode she cannot reach him) and start giving her high value treats as long as he's in sight, when he's gone the treats stop. Slowly, over the course of weeks, move closer and closer as she's happy with him being there at each distance. If she acts upset, then back up some and stay there till she's happy. You also need to practice in different locations, and with all of her "treasures". If you don't she may end up fine with him at one location but not in another, or with one object but with none of the others. An example would be she's fine in the living room on the dog bed, but guards the dog bed in the bedroom. Or she's fine with him approaching beds, but not toys. Like I said it's fixable, but it's not easy.

You can try and help your boy overcome his fear in much the same way you'll be working with the girl. First make 100% certain that he does not get attacked again, any squabble will undo all the work your fixing to put in getting him comfortable with her. Next start far enough away from the girl that he sees her but is not showing fear, then start feeding him very high value treats as long as she's in sight. Over the course of weeks, as he's not showing fear at each distance, move closer. You'd move maybe 1 or two steps closer each time and feed him the treats at that distance till he's happy to see her that far away them move closer a step or two more. How fast it goes depends on how fearful he is. If he's shaking and trying to get away you got to close for him to learn that she's not to be feared and you need to go back a few steps. Also if he's acting scared just end the session and get him away from her.

Also consider hiring a behaviorist, this link will help you find one http://www.dogforum.com/training-be...ainer-behavior-consultant-behaviorist-113946/ Make sure to get one that uses positive reinforecment techniques only, the last thing you want to do is act dominant towards her, claim her stuff, force her to submit, etc. That can make things much worse.
 
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You should not ever use lasers around dogs. They are prone to a form of OCD concerning light and lasers can set it off. A flirt pole is a safe alternative.
 

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I think you may have pushed too much togetherness too soon. Doorways are often areas of contention for dogs. The close quarters can make dogs tense, especially dogs that don't know each other well.

Playing with a toy of any sort with one is fine. But not if you don't know how both dogs will react to watching the play.

I'd ditch the laser toy. Not only can it cause some OCD like behavior, it can be so arousing for some dogs that it causes a dog to tip into over arousal and set off a fight.

Take two steps back and and evaluate how you can let the dogs interact without either dog feeling anxious. Sometimes we accidentally set dogs up to have unpleasant encounters. Imagine yourself thrown in to a living situation with a complete group of strange people and a strange dog and imagine how stressed you might feel. Your terrier is also feeling stressed with the new dog. They need time to gradually get to know each other and make some good associations about the other dog. Let your new dog settle in. Spend time with each dog separately. Feed them separately.

A great book is Feeling Outnumbered. Written by London and McConnell. This is also a good article. Three Ways to Confuse a New Dog
 
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