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I have a 9 month old chocolate lab/brittany spaniel mix, just in the last couple weeks she started chewing things up when she is home alone. When people are home she does not even look at anything to chew on or destroy but when everyone leaves she has been destroying our stuff. Not sure why this started happening all of a sudden. We crate trained her when we first got her and gradually began letting her stay out of her crate when no one was home. She was very good and never chewed anything up. Not sure as to why she began chewing stuff in the last couple weeks. And like I previously stated she only does it when no people are home. When people are home she doesnt even look at things to chew. We even tried buying her a bunch of new toys to chew on in hopes that maybe she was just bored and needed new toys but even with those she still decided to chew on our stuff.

Also when no people are home she is not home alone completely, we have a 3 year old golden retriever and they get along great!

PLEASE HELP!!!
 

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She could be starting the teenage phase. You may have to backtrack again and crate until she realizes it's unacceptable. Dogs acting up at this age is normal, and for the most part dogs will outgrow it.
 

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I agree with Timber..start to crate her again when she is alone, its probably a mixture of boredom, seperation anxiety and her starting to go through the dreaded teenage phase..you need to break this before it becomes a habit...crate her when she is alone . good luck
 
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Sounds like separation anxiety from you and other family members.
You'd expect to something other than just chewing with SA- peeing/pooping, frantic clawing at doors, drooling, etc. This sounds like a typical teenage jerkface who needs to be crated for the duration of the phase.
 

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My guess is that it's not just separation anxiety or, like others said, other behaviors would be exhibited as well. Whining, howling, scratching at the door when left, etc. In my experience separation anxiety doesn't suddenly crop in dogs without some sort of trigger as well- moving, change in the people/animals of the household, sticking the dog in a crate without training, change in routine (dog is left alone a lot more because someone went back to work) stuff like that.

To me it sounds like a young, very active dog entering the dreaded teenage phase. We went through it with our Brittany (the spaniel part is no longer considered part of the correct name, fyi) when I was younger. With proper management and maturity they do eventually grow out of it. I'd suggest going back to crating when you're gone. If you haven't used the crate in awhile do be aware that your dog may have taken several steps backwards in his crate training. Start from scratch there if you need to. It's really important to make sure that you keep him away from inappropriate items while you're away, so that's why I recommend revisiting the crate for awhile. An alternative would be to dog proof a room in your house, such as a bathroom. Remove everything that the dog can destroy and instead put appropriate toys in there. We used the garage with our Brittany until he was at least a couple of years old.

Leave him with appropriate toys to chew if you think it's safe. Our Brittany had jaws of steel as a puppy so we wouldn't trust him being left on his own with chews, but I leave my current rat terriers (lighter chewers) with appropriate chews when I'm gone. If you catch him chewing on an inappropriate item when you're home then redirect him to a more appropriate toy. If you see him chewing on his own chews then praise him heavily. Make sure he knows that chewing on his toys and chews is a GOOD thing and it makes you HAPPY! Too many people neglect to reward that kind of good behavior, and it makes it harder for the dog to grasp what's ok to play with and what's not.

Also make sure that the dog is getting plenty of mental and physical exercise. Sporting breeds are very active dogs bred to run all day long. At his age he's still a bit too young for on leash runs, but make sure he has lots of opportunities to run at liberty if at all possible, take him for lots of fun walks, play ball with him, play dates with other dogs, etc. A tired dog is a good dog, but don't overdo the hard exercise as his joints are still developing. Also make sure you're doing daily training sessions with him to challenge his mind. I'd recommend doing something active with him and a short training session with him before you have to leave for a fair period of time. A bored and understimulated dog will create their own activity, and sometimes that activity is tearing up your stuff.
 
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