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Hello. This is not a rescue dog. I have had a female miniature schnauzer since she was a puppy. It is my second so I am familiar with the breed and adored my first mini schnauzer which is why I decided to get another after she passed away. I've taken two dogs through obedience training in my life so I am familiar with the proper training techniques.

After my dog reached adolescence around 8 or 9 months old she began to become more and more out of control with anxiety and anti-social behavior with out of control barking (screaming) at any people especially if they are walking another dog. She is two now and she is still completely out of control outside of the house.

Inside, I have no problems with her as long as the blinds and windows remain shut. She is a very good dog inside but still freaks out over no apparent reason.

This dog does not bark or growl. She screams. No warning or anything just a sudden full on scream. I have never experienced this in my whole life of owning dogs. She wakes me up almost every night screaming at any noise the neighbors make. It's awful. She cuddles up against me so sweet but I know she will likely scream in the middle of the night at one point.

I've tried all the reward techniques, trying to inch her closer to the park where people are just sitting with family and looking at me and my screaming dog. And she knows the commands "speak and quiet" but not outside and I can't get her any closer than a hundred yards or so without her freaking out. People walking by have told me I need to socialize my dog. YES, tell me how! I need help.

I gave up on reward training and tried the collars, citronella first. It had no impact after the initial scare or two. I moved on to the shock collar which was horrible. This dog did not care how high the setting was. She would scream then yelp over and over until I scrambled to take the collar off of her. It was extremely embarrassing and that was outside my front door when she saw a neighbor she has seen countless times before. And yes, my neighbors probably hate me because of this dog.

I'm at a loss. I am will to pay an expert good money but not $100 per hour and only if she can be treated successfully which I doubt. But I honestly think this dog needs to be medicated. I've had dogs my whole life and have never experienced anything like this.

Anyone have any ideas that are not obvious ones that I have tried already? I live in Denver right across right next to two big parks which if I want to go and enjoy, can sadly not be done with my dog.
 

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I actually think it would be really worth it to invest in the help of a well-chosen certified behaviourist. Might run you $50-$70 an hour, but at the very least a consult should cost you nothing. At the very least you will glean a little more insult than you probably did dropping $150-$300 on a multi-level shock collar that just winds up on Craigslist. Book one after a vet check so that you have a bill of health to pass off to the behaviourist; this will rule things like hypothyroidism off the list.

What a behaviourist will probably prescribe is a LAT/BAT based plan, as the issue your dog is struggling with is reactivity: a very excessive, over-the-top emotional response to a stimulus that doesn't really warrant it. How a behaviourist can help this is by working with your dog (and showing you how to work with the dog) when they are below threshold: if she's in over her head at 100 feet from the stimulus, stand 105 feet back and reward her for any behaviour that is calmer than ballistic. Then gradually close that gap. When the dog has crossed the threshold, on the other hand, there is nothing to do but walk away (with the dog, of course) from the stimulus because they are simply so far in over their heads that there is no longer an opportunity to modify behaviour.

Some different aspects of this reactivity probably include:

-Barrier frustration (being on the other side of a window or barrier and seeing the stimulus).
-Leash reactivity (the fire is fanned because she feels that she cannot escape when on a leash).
-Human reactivity and dog reactivity (self explanatory).
-An ingrained behaviour (she does it because she's on behavioural autopilot at this point).

These things should be addressed one at a time. A certified behaviourist will be able to get you started in dealing with each. Once you can get some insight into what sets the dog off, how to gauge her approach of the threshold through body language and what motivates her, you should be able to chip away on the issue with just your wits, some patience and a high-value reward. If nothing else, it is worth trying before moving on to the last alternative: a psychiatric medication that may or may not work.
 
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