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We have a 2 year old greyhound, Jasper. He's generally good natured, compliant and eager to please, but he has a problem with small animals - cats, squirrels and small dogs (right up to the size of a Staffie). Usually he will recall well, but when he wants to chase a small animal, he'll do it and ignore our calls.

We have a muzzle for him, which we put on him every time we let him off the lead - but of course that doesn't stop him pinning another dog to the ground. It's a problem as we want to let him off the lead but are worried to do so.

We want to be humane, obviously, and we've seen one of these remote control spray collars -
- which looks like it might be useful.

Any advice - generally about the problem, or specifically about this product - would be appreciated.
 

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You do realize he's a sight hound and has years/decades of breeding to chase hunt prey that's what they're put on this earth for. Have you done any formal training with your pup. Before collar corrections are done dog must know why he's being corrected.
 

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Honestly, until you get it under control, you should not be taking him off lead around anything that he has the potential to chase. The more he does it, the more it is reinforced, the more he will do it. Corrections won't fix the problem. He needs training and management - not corrections. From what I've read, it seems like positive reinforcement while around smaller animals and on lead would be the best way to condition him, but it will take a long while of consistency. I'm sure some of our members more experienced in this can give you specifics.

Also, welcome. :D
 

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Not giving training directions but will say that prey drive is strong and aversive corrections may be needed after other pre-training is done. Just standard obedience is the place to start and I do agree with dog on lead at all times.
 

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Honestly, I don't have a lot of experience with this, but from what I've read and my limited experience with a reactive min pin who chased everything, I just don't think aversives for this type of behavior is appropriate. You can do more damage than good, including making a dog reactive to other dogs and exacerbating his excitement. Please read Suppression, Modification, Shutdown, and Fallout. before deciding to use aversives on something that needs management and conditioning, IMO. :) Hopefully someone with experience will chime in. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Mrs Martpol here - just to say thanks as well, and you've definitely convinced us not to go down the training collar route. We'll go right back to basics and keep him on the lead till we're more confident with him. This forum's great for day-to-day advice, but can anyone recommend a really good training book as well?
 

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I agree with Seebrown. Do not let your dog off lead until you have everything under control, because you definitely do not want to allow your dog to injure another dog or cat!
Also, look into finding a good trainer to help you!
This site might help you. http://www.apdt.com/petowners/ts/default.aspx

Mrs Martpol here - just to say thanks as well, and you've definitely convinced us not to go down the training collar route. We'll go right back to basics and keep him on the lead till we're more confident with him.
Yay! Thats the route I would personally choose as well!:)
With my Min Pin (also high Prey Drive) I have been really working on impulse control and "leave it" since practically day 1.
These are really great videos. I know that they show how to teach dogs to leave food but ime once you develop a good "leave it"/impulse control, it starts to translate to other situations as well. ;)

I also have worked A LOT on focus work and her recall, which are both going to be helpful for you. :)
This video shows one way to teach attention.
And this thread has a lot of videos that help to teach a great recall.
http://www.dogforum.com/dog-training/recall-9595/

Many of these videos use clicker training, which many of us here use. But if you do not have a clicker you can use a verbal marker (people often use "yes") instead. Using a marker is great because it allows you to communicate to your dog the exact moment that they did what you asked and earned a reward. :)

This forum's great for day-to-day advice, but can anyone recommend a really good training book as well?
I like this one especially for a beginner/the basics!;)


Once you understand positive reinforcement and marker training then this book might be helpful!
I haven't actually read it, but I have heard a lot of good things about it. It is on my list of books to buy!:)
Amazon.com: Chase!: Managing Your Dog's Predatory Instincts (Dogwise Training Manual) (9781929242689): Clarissa Von Reinhardt: Books
 

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Mrs Martpol here - just to say thanks as well, and you've definitely convinced us not to go down the training collar route. We'll go right back to basics and keep him on the lead till we're more confident with him.
That's great to hear! Keep us informed on how he progresses. :) We also love pictures. ;)
 
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