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Before making any suggestions, please read what I've written, I'm sure you all have your own preferences, but please keep in mind I am look for the right dog to fit my needs.

Allow me to begin by explaining myself.

I am a senior in college. I have one semester left until I graduate. (Woo!) I expect that I won't have a job in my chosen field immediately after graduation, (especially in this economy) and will probably spend some time living with my parents before I move out into my own apartment. My parents currently own two dogs, and the male is very protective of the female when around other dogs. (stange beacuse he never barks unless there is a dog near the female, then he goes crazy. (he's also fixed)) That said, I don't plan to get a dog for about a year or so, but figured it was best to start my research now, so I know exactly what dog to get when the time comes. I also live in New england, and probably will remain in the north, so cold weather dogs are probably suitable for where I am.

Another important note is that I can also see myself having kids within the next 10 years, so I hope that my dog will be good with children.

These are all the factors I have considered about myself. If there are any other factor you think I should consider, please let me know, and I will be sure to contemplate them.

My ideal dog:

I really like the look of Akitas, Huskys, Eurasier and Samoyed dogs. I can't explain it, but there's something I really like about their curled tail, and wolf-like face.

I want a medium to large sized dog. Preferably medium, since I will probably be living in an apartment for much of my dog's life.

Good with kids.

I want a dog that is very obedient. I will gladly make the effort to train my dog, and will even bring him to a dog trainer, and stay there while he's being trained. I will do whatever I have to to make him (or her) obedient, but the dog must eventually be willing to do what I tell him or her. (Also, while tricks are a plus, when I say training, I really just want a dog that can learn to come, stay, and if need be, stop barking)

Quiet. I would really hate for my dog to make my neighbors because another dog was walking down the street, or because it needs something. I really need my dog to be relatively quiet, and only bark under rare circumstances.

I want a dog that really enjoys my company. Of the two dogs my family has now. One can rarely be bothered to come to you unless he really wants attention, or he wants something, (a treat, or to go out) while the other will only come to someone to taunt the other. (they're petting me, and not you) I really want a dog that will almost always be by my side, that I can walk outdoors without a leash, and will stay pretty close to me, that if I bring him to work, he'll stay in my office, even if I leave the door open. That said, I also want to be able to leave him at home without him wrecking the place because he misses me.

I want a dog that isn't too energetic, and isn't too lazy. I am the type of person that normally goes for a walk everyday, but never goes for a run. I want my dog to be at about the same energy level I am.

Other things:

It's fine if he likes getting on the furniture, or my lap

Money is not an issue. (within reason) I'm willing to spend a few grand on a dog, provided it is a dog I like, that is healthy, and likes me.

I realize that this may be too idealistic, and too specific, but this is just my ideal dog. I may be flexible with a few aspects of this dog. I'm doing everything I can to make sure my dog is a perfect match for me when I eventually get him or her. If you have any other advice, please let me know, and I'll be sure to consider it.
 

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Hi and welcome. :) The good news is that much of what you're looking for in terms of training and loyalty will come with almost any breed--as long as you put in the time and effort, which it sounds like you're more than willing to do.

As far as barking goes, you'll probably want to stay away from LGD-types that are more predisposed to it than other breeds. You can get your pup used to different sights and sounds from an early age to minimize it, though. :)

I'm not an expert on the ins and outs of all breeds, but I can speak to my own experience (and others will chip in with theirs too). I have a male Rough Collie that I absolutely adore. Collies in general are fantastic with children. Gordon would much rather play with a four year-old kid than a yard full of dogs. They aren't as rambunctious/needy as Border Collies in terms of exercise and stimulation. Contrary to what many people think, they have the capacity to become couch potatoes if you let them. The females are quite a bit smaller than the males as well, and have less coat to deal with.

Keep in mind that not all dogs adhere to their breed standard 100% (much less so with bad breeding). Genes do play a role in the dog's personality, but a large part of it comes with the work that you put into it. If you're set on a purebred dog though, buying from a reputable breeder will increase the predictability of the dog's behavior in the future. Otherwise you might even look into a local breed-specific rescue and just find a dog that you click with. :)

I'm curious to see what other breeds people have to suggest. Personally, I love the regal/wolfy look of a lot of the longer-coated dogs too. ;)
 

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I agree with Gordon, not all dogs adhere to their breed standard. When picking a puppy, go with the advice of a good breeder. He/she will know which ones are likely going to be the head strong ones, and which ones are likely to be the happy go lucky ones.
I might suggest miniature australian shepherd, because they are often refered to as velcro dogs, they WANT to be with their person. They are super easy to train. They have the long coat look you want, and a mini could live in an apartment as long as he/she got enough exercise. They do require a good run, but this could be done in a dog park or any safe off leash area. I own a TOY aussie and she only requires two - three walks per day, along with what I call her zoomies session of running around in the back yard. Aussies also thrive on mental stimulation. If she/he gets plenty of exercise when you're not working, she should be fine during the day to be left alone. Aussie are not known to be chewers like labs. But they are intelligent, and if bored and not stimulated they will find ways to stimulate themselves. You've done the right thing, asking advice first and doing research. There's a neat site online, I think through the discovery channel that steps you through dog breed selection. I think it's called dog breed selector. Try a search engine for it. Good luck! :)
 

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Before making any suggestions, please read what I've written, I'm sure you all have your own preferences, but please keep in mind I am look for the right dog to fit my needs.

My ideal dog:

I really like the look of Akitas, Huskys, Eurasier and Samoyed dogs. I can't explain it, but there's something I really like about their curled tail, and wolf-like face.

I want a medium to large sized dog. Preferably medium, since I will probably be living in an apartment for much of my dog's life.


All of the breeds you mentioned are high energy and must be run every day or they tend to get destructive. So none seem to fit your profile. Mastiffs are the only ones that make good apt dogs they are couch potatoes but you may have to give them their own couch.
 

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A German Shepherd? there big, wolf like, and loyal. Or as someone else mentioned Aussies, their very loyal dogs and very very smart.

I will tell you that a Husky wouldn't be your match, they are independent dogs and and not in any way velcro dogs. Otherwise they are very socialble dogs, mine was great with kids and babies, loved them, he never barked, howled occasionally, he needed excercise though. But their not velcro dogs and are just fine to go off and do their own thing.
 

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Perhaps an American Eskimo Dog or a spitz mix from a shelter?

Because you live in an apartment, a small or medium dog is probably going to be best since it can be very difficult to find apartments that allow large dogs. In fact, when I lived in an apartment we were limited to dogs under 25 lbs.
Also, several breeds including Akitas, are commonly banned from apartment complexes (at least here in the US).
 

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Perhaps an American Eskimo Dog or a spitz mix from a shelter?

Because you live in an apartment, a small or medium dog is probably going to be best since it can be very difficult to find apartments that allow large dogs. In fact, when I lived in an apartment we were limited to dogs under 25 lbs.
Also, several breeds including Akitas, are commonly banned from apartment complexes (at least here in the US).
^^this! im speaking from experience. i have 2 great danes. im actually moving right now, i finally found a place that would let me have them. its VERY hard to find an apartment with anything more than a medium size dog. most everywhere i looked wanted 35lbs max. sure my danes are awesome apartment dogs, but try telling everyone else that! a lot of apartment owners are not "dog people" and dont do a lot of research on breeds. therefor you end up with lots of restrictions including size AND breed.

as for what you have listed, most of that is all training. as far as breeds you listed you liked- huskies tend to be very independent, akitas.... no grudge against them but i wouldnt put them around children unless they were raised with them, eurasiers are nice dogs... but keeping in mind restrictions apartments may have with size, samoyeds i really like, and are ok in apartments provided you give them the exercise they need.. but then again, there is the size too... females can be smaller so you may want to go that way.

as far as what i think.... what about a shiba inu? they look like little akitas. they are smart and do need exercise, but adapt well. a keeshond maybe? they will need a little more exercise but are nice too.
 

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What about a Collie?

I also really like the Rough Collie, though it looks a bit more like a fox. Could this dog be a good match for me? I've heard they are often shy of strangers, would this make them a good velcro dog?
 

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Mine is a very velcro-dog, although he's only 5 months old so it may be a puppy thing. And he LOVES people. All of them, any of them, wherever we are. :)

Both of those things are usually pretty "trainable" if you get a young puppy, though. :)
 

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I have to ditto GDM and kmes with watching the size you get as most apartments have size and breed restrictions. Also Dawnben has a good point that the breeds you mentioned can be high energy breeds. I think when you move into an apartment and see what their restrictions are its best to get a dog then. Also an older dog is going to be your best bet since potty training is a big thing when renting. I lived in an apartment for 1 1/2 years with 2 small dogs and 2 big dogs and its tough with a breed who needs lots of stimulation.

If you go through a breeder please make sure its a reputable breeder, that means the dog will have papers and both parents will be tested for things such as health issues, bone issues, etc etc (breeders or those experienced with breeders can give you more specifics) and those test results should be available. If they dont have those they are a byb and should not get your money :)
 
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