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Hello pet lovers! I have a question that’s been on my mind for a while now. I’ve been afraid of dogs my whole life (grew up in the country with lots of aggressive strays and been stalked and nearly bitten many times as a kid!) and a year ago I finally decided to get myself a dog because I felt like I was missing out in life, ya know? I was a first time owner and have 2 cats at home. So I decided to go with a safe choice (bought instead of rescuing from a pound) and I felt really bad about it but I didn’t want to take risks. So I got a goldendodle, seemed like a safe choice. And we love him dearly and have no issues with him at all. Beside walking on a leash. Still working on that... kind of... unsuccessfully haha but when we go out we always go to off leash areas. Anyways! I feel like we’re ready for dog #2. And here’s the dilemma... I can’t decide whether to get a small dog or a large one. Here’s my thinking: I really want a small breed dog so I can take it everywhere with me. I have a weird public anxiety and feel much better with a buddy. My little pony here doesn’t walk on leash and gets too excited on public so he’s park and lake bound. And I really want a little munchkin who’d snuggle with me and be my bestie. BUT since it’d be only other dog in the house I’m afraid my doodle may hurt him (on accident) or won’t leave him alone (he needs to play all day every day). On the other hand I feel like my dog deserves a buddy, someone to play at the dog park and our backyard with and just wear each other out. I love playing with him but who am I kidding? He has way more energy! (We take him to an off leash dog park almost every day). I’ve been dreaming of a border collie for years now.. and I think it’d be a good match agility and intelligence wise. Question is... which one is a better choice considering all the factors? My doodle is not fixed (yet..) because we wanted to continue his line and get his puppies since he has the best personality ever... but if we get second dog, I guess that won’t be an option anymore? Is not getting anymore dogs really the best case scenario here? Help!
 

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Well, first off, the only way you can take a dog into public with you is if it is a service dog. They must be task trained to mitigate their handlers disability to legally qualify as a service dog and must have extensive public access training. Comfort is not a task, and an animal that serves only to comfort you is an ESA, which does not have public access rights. That doesnt make them any less important though! Riley is my ESA and he helps me a ton, i just cant take him into public non pet friendly places with me. I believe with a psychiatric service dog you need a note from your doctor as well. These are the US laws though, if you are in another country look up the laws.
Secondly, large and small dogs can live happily together if they are properly intorduced. I know someone with a great dance and a chihuahua who are best friends. Intact dogs can also live happily together as long as the dog does fine with other intact dogs, it depends on the dog really. And if you get a female you have to separate them when she is in heat.
If you plan to breed your dog please make sure to health test! You dont want to spread health issues throigh the breed.
I would not suggest a border collie if you cannot keep up with your doodle, border collies have even more energy than a doodle and can develop behavioral issues if they do not get the exercise they need.
 

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I don't think all dogs need to have another dog, especially if they are getting regular interaction from their humans.

Have you considered addressing the few issues that you have with your goldendoodle like the leash walking and the over excitement? Those things can be pretty typical of the breeds that your guy is mixed with but can be trained out. You could teach him how to focus on you in public place and how to have impulse control. He could be the type of dog that you bring to dog friendly places with a little bit of work. As for the breeding, if that's something you really think you want to do I would look into the heath tests that will prove that the dog has no genetic qualms. Things like eyes, hips, and elbows can all be checked to make sure that no bad traits are being passed down. Also, since over breeding is an issue in the US most reputable breeders really want to see their dogs being campaigned in something like agility, obedience, or other sports. Something the proves that the dog is an ideal specimen and going to contribute to the breed (or in your case the growth of a breed).

As far as the Border Collie, they are an extremely difficult breed that if not trained and given some type of job they will more then likely have obedience issues. They say they will MAKE a job. I've always told people if you are not SURE that you are the right home for a BC, then you are probably not the right home for a BC. They are intense and unlike any other dog out there.
 

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Do you have ample (and I do mean AMPLE) time to commit to training your Border Collie? Intense mental stimulation and lots of exercise - walks are not going to cut it.

How about dealing with biting? BCs nip a lot as puppies, extremely mouthy. But you need to deal with it extremely kindly because Border Collies have very soft temperaments, they don't handle corrections well at all.

How about obsessive compulsive behaviours? BCs are notorious for getting fixated and doing the same thing over and over and over again. They can lick themselves raw if under-stimulated, destroy your house, herd children, squirrels, or most dangerous of all, cars.

Border Collies (in general) do not like other non-BCs. They make terrible dog park dogs, because most dogs are rude and obnoxious (to a Border Collie). In particular almost every BC I have ever met has zero patience for bouncy, happy go lucky Labs and Goldens. Something to consider.

How do you feel about hair? Border Collies shed, quite a bit, especially the rougher the coat. Would you be okay brushing our your dog twice a week to remove the dead undercoat?

Also, unless you get a particular line that is known for it, Border Collies do not snuggle.

If you're planning to breed, think long and hard about what your dog would bring to the breed. Neurotic, over-the-top excitement, and frustration/reactivity are super common in the breed (and it sounds like you are experiencing some of that in your dog), which is not ideal for a breed designed to do service work. If you're seriously thinking about breeding, please find a breeder to take you under their wing and teach you. There is so much more to breeding than mating two dogs.

As far as needing another dog, most dogs do not care about having another dog around. My dogs don't even play with each other unless I'm around. When we leave, they sleep until we get back. If your dog is having regular exposure to dogs and playing with them, his socialization needs are probably being met.

A small dog and large dog can live together as long as you manage how the big dog plays with the smaller (growing up we owned a Pit/Lab mix and my sister had Miniature Dachshunds).
 

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Border Collies are great dogs, but they are not for everyone. They basically want to be out in open fields herding sheep or other critters most, if not all day. All that energy has to be channeled somewhere constructive, or they will become very restless, and a restless Border Collie can be a real handful. I also agree with the comment, that not all dogs need a dog buddy, ours certainly does well as an only dog. The BC's I have known are great dogs, and very affectionate, but their affection is displayed only on their terms and only when they choose. Non that I have known have every been much for cuddling next to you on a couch, or if they do, only for a very short time, then they want to run!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok thanks everyone for the input! I’m so glad I asked. No BC then. What do you all think about a corgi or a chihuahua as a lap slash little buddy dog for me? My doodle gets overly excited sometimes and doesn’t realize his weight so it makes me a little nervous getting a small dog but I really want one... as for breeding, I’m not planning to breed him for profit. Our family member also has a doodle so we were thinking way later down the road to have puppies just once to continue the line and have a little piece of our loved pets so when they pass we will have their off spring. But yeah I’ll check the health stuff, thanks for the tip. Any advice on corgis or chihuahuas? Or any other small breed? Thanks guys!
 

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Corgis are a great breed. They can be a little nippy though, just because they are also herders. Shed a lot as well. Good with kids. They're actually the best dogs for first time owners. Corgi's are more like small to medium size dogs. They can't be carried around like a Chihuahua.

Chihuahua's shed as well, but not as much as a Corgi. Can be a little yappy. Harder to train than Corgi's. Can be good with kids and other dogs, but I think Corgi's do a lot better. Depends on the dog's personality.
 

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They're actually the best dogs for first time owners.
I disagree. Maybe some first time owners will do well with a corgi, but they’re not really a breed I’d recommend for a first time owner. As a herding breed they need adequate exercise and mental stimulation or they may get into trouble. Ime they have pretty “big,” assertive, sassy personalities that can be hard to handle for someone unfamiliar with raising and training dogs. They can also be very mouthy and nippy as you mentioned. I don’t think they’re the hardest dogs to own, but I think a lot of first time owners would be overwhelmed with a corgi.

Here is an article I read once about a corgi that I thought was funny, but itÂ’s just talking about what itÂ’s like to raise a high drive puppy.

http://www.collared-scholar.com/two-pounds-of-fur-and-fury-understanding-puppies-with-drive/

Corgis are definitely not lap dogs, BUT they are very capable of keeping up with and rough housing with larger dogs.


Chihuahuas on the other hand are a much better choice for a lap dog but are more fragile- youÂ’d have to be more careful about how your doodle interacts with the chihuahua.

There are some larger sized toy breeds- pugs and cavalier King Charles spaniels have great temperaments and are sturdier but unfortunately are prone to many health issues. Even something like a shih tzu or a havanese might be a little hardier than a chihuahua.

An American cocker spaniel is a little bigger than a toy breed but the ones IÂ’ve known have been a nice medium energy level and have a happy, playful personality. IÂ’ve fostered a purebred American cocker and my last dog was half American cocker. Both great, easy going dogs.

Beagles are another choice for a larger “small” dog but aren’t quite lap dogs either. As scent hounds theyre little more independent than the other breeds but I think they have very sweet, friendly temperaments as well.




A little off topic but since you mentioned it, I agree with the others if youÂ’re going to breed your current dog you should really think about what they would add to the population- does he have a bomb proof, easy going temperament? Friendly towards everyone? Easy to train? And definitely do research on health issues in both poodles and retrievers and what health testing you have to do on your dog to make sure he isnÂ’t a carrier or affected by any of those genetic diseases. And the same goes for whichever female you want to breed to.
 

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Have you considered holding off on a second dog and focusing on fixing some of the issues you have with your current dog? A lot of the things that you point out like his over excitement when he sees people can be pretty typical of the breed but can also usually be trained to get over. Sometimes the excitement of possibly getting a new puppy can cause people to rush into things that they maybe aren't ready for. Then instead of 1 dog with a few issues you'll have 2 dogs with double the problems.

I would recommend taking a step back and maybe talking with a trainer. Golden poodle mixes can be really great sociable dogs (it's why a lot are used for therapy work), you just have to get them to control their minds.
 

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Thanks for all the advice! My doodle has a heart of gold and attitude of gold as well. He behaves VERY well, no issues with pets, kids or other dogs (although he HATES huskies. He never bit an animal but he growled and scared some huskies away. It’s like he’s trying to keep that breed away from us when we are at the park).
His Instagram is @Groodlelove
He trains easy. No more than 5mins to learn a command. Sometimes he can be subborn but only if he had a bad day.

I’m leaning towards either another cat or a chihuahua or a toy poodle mix (whatever they have available at the shelter). I guess I’m going to have to decide! Definitely don’t want more than a toy dog now, realizing how much work another med to large size dog will add.
 

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If you are considering a Beagle, they are very affectionate dogs, but, once that nose of theirs activates, they will pay attention to nothing else. They are truly scent driven dogs, and tend to have a very independent disposition. Everyone I know that has a Beagle, loves them to death, but are also driven crazy by them.
 
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