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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello I've joined his forum for some general advice after getting a GSD.

After months of research and then a month of searching we finally found the puppy we wanted and brought him home last week.

He's been great from the start he was curious about us, the house and the baby.

We've already trained him to pee and poo outside, he knows his name, he knows when it's quiet time (sleeping) and he knows to circle the back door when he wants to be let out, oh and he's getting the hang of sitting.

What I want to know is, is this fast learning (1 week) normal? He still does some accidents which we fully expect and hasn't understood not to jump yet but I can tell he's picking it up.

Have I got lucky with an easily trainable pup or is this normal? Two of my friends have GSDs and they said they didn't pick up things that fast.

He also doesn't bark or whimper for attention anymore unlike the first few days.

I feel lucky but is this normal behaviour for a GSD? I know they're fast learners.

Thank you

Oh and here's a picture:
 

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He's precious! Yes, that is fast learning. GSDs are a very smart breed. This is why they are a favorite for police work, service dogs, search and rescue, schutzhund, and television. They can also be high aggression to dogs and people, but when raised right they're amazing dogs. Even if you got a smart breed it sounds like you really got a good boy and have been doing a great job training him. I bet he's destined for great things. :)
 

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What a cutie! He's learning fast, but don't label him easy yet. All dogs have their challenges and you've only had him a week, plenty of time for him to become a troublemaker ;) Enjoy the little guy!
 

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Somewhat typical with a GSD, yes! My boy is 5 now, and I can teach him pretty complex things in a short 15 minute session. Not only are they intelligent, but what makes them so easy to train is their willingness to please their owners. Of course there is some grey area and I've totally met a handful of knucklehead GSDs, but in general they are very intelligent, biddable and sensible dogs. After owning my first GSD, I'll never not own a shepherd.

As Tracie mentioned, they can be pretty prone to aggression towards people/animals outside their perceived pack. They are (in general) very aloof of strangers and can very easily become over protective or develop fear aggression under certain situations. My GSD has pretty severe fear aggression after being attacked by another dog and no longer tolerates strange people or animals.
 

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You have a very smart and cute pup! Never stop training. I too lucked out with an easy to train pup, that potty trained herself without error lol.

Pat yourself on the back, get ready for the ride and keep us posted! Emphasis on *keep training*. As your puppy starts exploring more it's easy to regress in areas he was once strong in. For example, my pup used to loose leash walk like a pro and not pull when she was excited to meet strangers..now she loose leash walks amazingly well, but has it in her head that everyone must pet her and pulls for them. as they grow up, they get more curious, go through hard headed stages, test boundaries and become more independent..its up to you to maintain the structure!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for all the positive replies.

We will keep up with his training and keep everyone posted.

My SO woke up with a bit of puppy blues this morning, it's mainly her that looks after Obie and the baby when I'm at work and she's realised its actually harder than she first thought. We knew it would be hard work and we both are hard working people and we walk everywhere but when Obie and my baby are in the same room and Obie is trying to nip and being excitable she finds it hard.

I told her to create boundaries by putting him in the kitchen (we have a baby gate) and once she's done playing/feeding the baby then to let him back in but she's finding it difficult to look for obies pee and poo signs and keeping an eye on the baby. Any advice?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Also how long should we play with him and how long should be spent training him?
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First of all, I think you should also enroll him in a puppy class, and socialize him with lots of other people and dogs (if he's got all his shots), especially since unsocialized Shepherds are dangerous. It's best to train puppies for just a few minutes when you still have their attention, then play, then train again, then food and nap, etc. Stuff like that. But honestly, as long as you're training him regularly and he's learning, you can play with him as much as you want!
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Yeah we have enrolled him in training classes starting the 22nd of April.

So would you recommend half an hour in the morning and half an hour in the evening?


Your comment has helped thanks
 

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Yeah we have enrolled him in training classes starting the 22nd of April.

So would you recommend half an hour in the morning and half an hour in the evening?


Your comment has helped thanks

At his age, a half hour would be too long for structured training. At that age I usually do many short little 5 minute sessions, along with using play to train - i.e. ask for a sit, then tug. Ask for a sit, then fetch. Rinse and repeat until the pup starts getting tired of the game. It's important to keep them engaged when your training and they have very, very short attention spans at that age.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yeah we have enrolled him in training classes starting the 22nd of April.

So would you recommend half an hour in the morning and half an hour in the evening?


Your comment has helped thanks

At his age, a half hour would be too long for structured training. At that age I usually do many short little 5 minute sessions, along with using play to train - i.e. ask for a sit, then tug. Ask for a sit, then fetch. Rinse and repeat until the pup starts getting tired of the game. It's important to keep them engaged when your training and they have very, very short attention spans at that age.
Ahh so short bursts is the key here, thank you
 
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