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Hello there first time poster here and hoping you guys will be able to help give me and my family some direction on what to do here. we have 4 Pomeranian dogs, 2 female and 2 male. The dogs names are Eve (Female, Mother of Squirtle and Bayley), Bubba (father of Squirtle and Bayley), Squirtle (Male son), And Bayley (female daughter).

Now the problem is that bubba and squirtle refuse to get along. In the same room they will start growling at each other and eventually barking and actual fighting.

Bubba has been neutered, and for a period of years has been effectively out of the household. He moved out with my sister. She is now moving back in and this needs to be dealt with. There was no major fighting before he originally moved out.

Squirtle has not been neutered. He has also had sex with both his mother and sister after Bubba was moved out (I dont know if its relevant but something tells me it is).

We all disagree with how to proceed with resolving this issue. They all think Neutering squirtle will solve it but i am reluctant to trust that to fix it. A number websites i have read say to Support to dominate dog. Which in my opinion would be Squirtle. They believe that Bubbe is still the alpha/dominate male because he was so in the past. I believe his moving out changed all that and its supported by the fact that this did not start until after he moved out. I also believe that Both the females recognize Squirtle as the Alpha over Bubba at this point due to his removal. Right now I believe squirtle perceives Bubba as an intruding male upon his territory and that is why he is acting so aggressive.

Right now Squirtle gets the short end of the stick with getting put up/isolated and "blamed" for starting it.

Advice? OH! and the pups are now 4 years old I dont know how old bubba is
 

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Ok...first step, abandon the "alpha dog" theory since its completely inaccurate.

Second step, neuter & spay your pets.

Ok, assuming steps 1 & 2 will be done, what kind of training and socialization have these dogs had? How much exercise do they get? Poms are small, but they still need to run and burn off energy. If they don't, that energy is likely to come out in aggressive/destructive ways, just like any dog.
 

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Forget the alpha dog thing. What is causing the problem is stress. Now you can try and fix the behavior which likely won't work, or you can help the dogs in question handle and ground the stress effectively.

Neutering will likely not help the aggression, but I would suggest you spay the females and or neuter the younger male so you don't end up with puppies.
 

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Just because they got along before Bubba moved out, now that he is back of course your other male will look at him as an intruder. He is not going to stop trying to keep Bubba away from "his girls" especially since he is not neutered. Neutering might help but it should be done anyway to prevent more puppies.

I would keep them separated until your male is neutered and then only have them together when they are both on leash. You may never be able to get them to like each other but you may get them to just not fight every time they are together.
Definitely keep them separated if you are not right there as every time they get a chance to fight, it makes it even worse.
 

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Pomeranians are very cocky dogs, they don't like anyone that is below them in importance, and i am now talking about solving problem with male. When it comes to some social problems with them, neutering is probably ONLY way to solve some of their problems. I saw a couple of similar cases, but they were all males...
 

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Now, while everyone here telling to neuter Squirtle, what if the OP actually did not neuter him because he is used for Confirmation Shows and or Stud duties? Show dogs would be disqualified once neutered and I do feel that having a show dog is everybody's right.

And with the lack of additional puppies mentioned, I think the positive way and argued that the OP must already experienced in managing the urges of his/her dogs.

It seemed that the fight, for starter, is due to lack of re-socialiation between Bubba and Squirtle. While it's true they used to be related and living together peacefully in the past, efforts must be made to properly socializing Bubba back to "Squirtle's household" up to and including the two females. Try to get them in positive, observable situation with distances between them while giving them treats and praises, proceed to gradually move them closer and closer until the growling is gone and such.

In the meantime, you better try move Bubba's bed to another room entirely to avoid war from breaking out until at least a week spent without fighting.

I knew the reasons behind neutering and spaying, but without proper resocialization, things could and possibly get even worse because Neutering did not totally diminish agression in dog. Worst thing that could happen to OP if he simply neuter squirtle is the fighting still happened, or actually happened with another dog (the girls), and now Squirtle lost his status as Show-Qualified dog.

Remeber, that you can't just shove Bubba to his old household and expect everyone there to accept him back, gradual Socialization seems to be best bet rather than promoting neutering for everyone.
 

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regardless of the male do, I'd neuter the intact male, since it is living with intact females an you're obviously not able to keep them separated (otherwise he wouldn be about to do the deed with his mother and sister).

In a lot of cases nautering doesn't change much of the behaviour but as long as you don't plan an breeding (and you shouldn't breed a dog showing breed-uncharacteristic aggression) you should neuter your dog if you're not able to guarantee thatyou prevent it from fathering a litter.

I'd try training adequate behaviour with the male dogs alone. best while walking andn ot in direct contact (i.e. on a leash by diffrent person).
give them enough exercise every, keep them interested in you and playing/working and slowly get them used to each other on a leash and in a controlled setting before letting them have conact off-leash.
 
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