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I have a fantastic male French bulldog ( desexed )but after an injury and a lot of time at home he was very attached to me . I decided to get him a friend . I decided after study I should get two puppy's . I bought 2 female pugs (5 months now ) , they absolutely love each other , they do everything together even sleep together . i treat them equally , this is when they both get so enraged at each other ( they fight like two tom cats) this can also happen with bones ( that Iv confiscated now) . I bought a massive rectangle bowl all 3 dogs can eat there dried food at together ,and there is never a problem . My Frenchy is an amazing step dad and will play fight gently with them . Except one of my pugs waits till then ,and will attack the other so its like 2-1 . The same pug really has no interest in fetch . But will wait halfway to attack the other pug on the way back? . These 3 dogs absolutely love each other . They go on walks and drives together , everything ! Except I am breaking up around 4 fights a day . Iv put my frenchy and myself inside and confiscated there bones . Iv just bought 2 dog playpens and hoping time outs will evidently work ? . Will they grow out of this ? any suggestions ??? my neighbor is getting a little sick of it
 

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Getting 2 puppies from the same litter is rarely a good idea and often leads to problems. I think this can especially be a problem with sisters.

See these links about the issue- often called "littermate syndrome":
https://blog.betternaturedogtraining.com/2013/07/18/littermate-syndrome/
https://paws4udogs.wordpress.com/2012/03/30/littermate-syndrome/
Raising Siblings
(The last one is particularly good informative)

Littermate syndrome is fairly common in homes with even unrelated dogs of the same age, brought home together as puppies. Dogs will either be overly attached or inappropriately aggressive with each other, and may display anxiety when separated, or sometimes show aggression or fear towards novel stimuli.

In order to avoid it, it is recommended to give as much separation as possible. The last article I posted said it best:"They must be allowed, no, REQUIRED, to have their own space, to develop their own personalities, and to look to the owner for bonding and love...
1. Crate them separately (preferably in separate rooms or at opposite ends of a room.)
2. Feed them separately.
3. Walk them separately.
4. Play with them separately.
5. Take them to the vets separately.
6. Train them separately.
7. TRAIN them! Take them to a good obedience class where the instructor knows how to work with littermates. Take them on separate nights. Do NOT take them to the same class."

At this point you have 2 dogs fighting consistently. This is not a good or fair situation to any of these 3 dogs or you. I think the dog play pens will be good management tools and are a better option than a crate for a house trained dog, IMO, but I do not think that 'time outs' will do anything to help with this issue. Dogs don't understand the concept of a 'time out'. Usually this kind of method (removing a dog from a situation when they present a behavior) is recommended more for management (as in, remove a dog from a situation likely to provoke the behavior), or removing play/fun activity/attention (like a puppy getting too excited and being put away; although it would be more successful IMO to just stop engaging vs actually removing the dog). A 'time out' between 2 dogs with a known history of fighting with one another is going to do nothing on its own. Unrelated but I think also important to note is at 5 months these dogs are still puppies, and displaying aggressive behavior at this age is not a good sign and not good for their developing psyches- I would be worried about their ability to be around other dogs as adults/possible dog aggression issues, although the unrelated adult dog is probably good socialization.

I would suggest the following steps:
1- Definitely stop feeding all the dogs in the same bowl. This is a bad idea for several reasons. One is that both these breed (pugs and frenchies) are some of the most common breeds to become morbidly obese. They both are breeds who have a lot of problems when they are overweight- they struggle to breath as it is, and added weight isn't helpful, plus whent hey are obese skin can sometimes fold heavily over their nose and further block them. They are both breeds that gain weight very quickly and do not lose weight easily, and they can both be sedentary (although both breeds tend to either be couch potatoes or never stop moving). These are dogs that you should be feeding careful amounts to and adjusting based on current weight to maintain a correct weight.

More pressing, though- it is asking for food aggression issues, especially in dogs already displaying aggression issues, and may have been to blame for later resource guarding issues with bones. Resource guarding is a behavior rooted in insecurity. The dog thinks it needs to guard because it is afraid it will loose the food/toy/whatever if it does not. These three dogs are learning exactly that when eating out of the same bowl. If I do not guard what I have, these other two dogs will eat it.

Dogs need to have their own bowls spaced reasonably apart and the owner needs to be strict about no one eating from any bowl but their own at mealtimes.

2- I would recommend you immediately start separating them. For one, because they are attacking each other fairly consistently and if you don't stop it it is likely to get worse and harder to get rid of, and two because this is what should be happening with littermates being raised together to begin with. I'm weary of the claim that "These 3 dogs absolutely love each other" because, quite frankly, it does not sound like they do. It is not typical behavior for 5 month old puppies to be having fights 4 times a day and IMO is also unusual for such young dogs to be consistently guarding objects from each other.

3- implement some kind of counter-conditioning regimen, and start working with them separately. IMO, I would keep the 2 pugs separated unless you are actively working on the issues between them. While hanging out with the older dog will be good for both of them, I also think that they should be getting one-on-one training sessions and walks as well. While they don't need to be earning any obedience titles, I do think basic obedience is important both for the practicality of it and for the mental engagement aspect. I also think that beginners/puppy obedience serves as a crucial socialization experience both for the puppies/dogs and the owners.

This website does a good job of explaining issues relating to dog aggression between cohabiting dogs, as well as talks about different methods (counter-conditioning desensitization, teach a new behavior response using operant conditioning methods like BAT or CAT, management, or making the stress go away through physical exercise and mental engagement through teaching obedience behaviors):
Multi-Dog Household Aggression | Whole Dog Journal

- I would also highly recommend seeking a local trainer to help you with addressing this issue. Counter conditioning the dogs to each other seems like the best starting place, especially since it sounds like there are times where there is peace in the house. "Counter conditioning" in this instance would consist of replacing the aggressive response they have to each other with something more positive through associating the presence of the other dog with food- a "condtioned emotional response". The two sisters would be worked with at increasingly close distances and with more and more added freedom of movement/stress, and be given treats for the behavior that you want to see (ie, not fighting). Maybe eventually they might be let loose together, you would call them, they might sit, you would give them their treats. They slowly learn that when they see each other and are calm, they get treats. The goal is for them to be able to co-exist together peacefully, but it will take time, patience and effort to get there.

Like I said before, working on obedience behaviors would also be a good idea, most importantly things like "sit" or "come" or "place" that can be used to regain control in a situation where a fight might break out- seems like these would all be helpful in stopping rough play before it begins when these fights sound likely to happen. Teaching alternative behaviors through things like BAT (Behavioral Adjustmet Training) might also be helpful to look into. I would avoid punishment in resolving this issue (specifically e-collars), as it may cause escalation of aggression.
 

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As it was said, getting two puppies at the same time is a bad idea. Getting two female littermates is an even worse idea. Are they spayed? Two intact females can get into the WORST kind of dog fights (that's literally why they call them "bitch fights"). They won't grow out of it, and in fact it's very likely to get worse. Do NOT feed any dogs from the same bowl. In fact get them all different bowls and put them in separate corners of the room--or even different rooms or in their pens.

I have to say the last poster said all the basic (and good advice) I would reiterate to not leave the Pugs alone together. Also, if you're not willing to do A LOT of work training these dogs separately, rehoming one of the Pugs might have to be an option. Living with dogs fighting all the time is no way to live, for the people or dogs. We had to return a Beagle we adopted last year after 3 weeks because she kept fighting with my Stella, and it wasn't even half that much. Please make sure you're not sticking your hands into the middle of the fights and grab the dogs from the hind end, not near their face. Even by accident they can bite you badly.

I'm also curious about the research you did that made you decide to get the two Pugs. What was that research and what did it say?
 
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I got two sisters at one time only because their situation was so terrible that I HAD to get them out of there. I'm seriously considering rehoming one them after they're eight weeks because there really is the possibility of them hurting each other. There is NO SHAME in rehoming one of your two sister pups. You must understand that rehoming does NOT equal failure on your part. Sometimes it is the most humane thing that you can do. It takes a LOT of work and training (the human being trained, that is) to raise two sister puppies into mentally healthy adult dogs.

Sorry I don't have any suggestions about keeping both pups. Whatever you decide, I wish you best of luck.
 
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