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I've had my cat for 5 years now. She's been the center of our world and always had free run of the house . We got a puppy 2 weeks ago . (11 week old golden retriever / lab mix) . He drives me crazy but for the most part he's a good dog for the most part , he doesn't get into too much trouble which makes me feel very lucky but one thing that really concerns us is him chasing the cat!

When he's calm he ignores her sometimes , or walks up to her to sniff her and walks away nicely when we redirect him and tell him to be nice , but when he's hyper all he wants to do is chase and bark at her . I know he's a puppy and is just trying to make a new friend but it really makes me sad to think my cat , who use to have our undivided attention might think she's been replaced. We're always busy keeping the puppy out of trouble , and we've gated off half of the house so she has a safe place to hang out that's puppy free but I hate that she's isololating herself now because she's annoyed by the puppy chasing her. She use to come lay on the couch with my husband and I , or Chase her toys around the house...she was so happy but now I'm afraid she's depressed and sad that were spending most of our time with the puppy. We do make time to hang out with just her but I really want her to feel safe in her house again..the whole house .

Does anyone have any advice or experience with this? Will it get better when he's older and calmer ? I know she will always be weary of him. she's an anxious cat to begin with and she doesn't care much for other animals , even cats but I am noticing that when the puppy comes up to her she gives him a fair amount of patience and tolerance before things go too far and she hisses. I think she could warm up to him ,or at least tolerate him if he would just stop chasing her !

Any help is SO appreciated !
 

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If the cat gets sick enough of the puppy, the cat's claws should take care of the warning the pup needs to give the cat some room. Its a puppy, so its going to test every boundary to see how far he can go.

Good luck!!!
 

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I would think in terms of "time sharing", & make sure your cat still gets some one on one puppy-free time (pup in crate, another room, or on a walk with another person). Then give your cat what she wants--special treats, toy time, petting, sleepine on your lap, etc.
In my house, the master bedroom is permanent "cat-land, no dogs allowed", that gives them a safe comfy permanent place.
Breedwise, you may not have to worry about actual safety, but your cat needs to "feel" safe too.
No matter how carefully you manage things, of course there will be an adjustment period that will be unconfortable for your cat, but will get better.

Introducing Dogs and Cats — Jackson Galaxy
 

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We've been through the same thing with our recently adopted 3-year-old labradoodle and our two cats--and I expect it will be the same with the puppy we're bringing home next week. It's heart-breaking when your previously loving cat won't cuddle with you anymore or is afraid to roam the house.

In addition to gating off a part of the house for the cats like you have, we consulted a dog behaviorist to figure out how to get the dog to stop chasing the cats. It's a huge pain. The long and short of it is that you have to prevent the dog from chasing the cat each and every time, because it's a fun, exciting activity that is self-reinforcing. To do this, I tethered the dog to me or had her in her crate or pen at all times. Then, at least a couple times a day I would get the dog and at least one cat in the same room to work on the dog's behavior. I would get a really good grip on the dog with a short leash, say "leave it" and treat her as soon as she shifted her attention to me instead of the cat. Even if she glanced away from the cat for just a second--treat. And then I would continue to treat for as long as I could keep the dog focused on me. As time went on, her focus on the cat lessened and I was able to lead her closer and closer to the cat and still maintain her attention until the dog was sitting right next to the cat and not paying attention to her at all.

However, one thing that didn't help is that we had one cat that was willing to be in the room with the dog and another that was too terrified for even that. The behaviorist said it was important not to force the really scared cat to be in proximity to the dog, but instead to try to lure her out by putting her food bowl a few inches outside the pet gate and then farther and farther out each time. If she wasn't willing to venture out, we'd just give her the food bowl in her usual place, but often she would be willing to come out briefly.

Over time, the cat became more and more willing to come out of her gated off area. Now, after about 4 months, she's regularly roaming around the house like she used to, but still tries to stay out of the dog's way as much as she can. The dog very occasionally barks at one of the cats and is reprimanded for it, but never chases them anymore. Unfortunately, the cats still won't cuddle with us at night like they used to because the dog is in our room. We have a lot less contact with the cats than before, but I'm hopeful that with time, that will improve as well.

One thing that surprised me is that each time our dog and cats were absent from each other for a time, their relationship improved dramatically when they were back together again. It was like the cats forgot to be afraid of the dog while she was gone and the dog forgot that she liked to chase them. The absences happened when we would go on vacation and the dog went to stay with friends while the cats stayed at our house.

I have two kids that are two years apart, and in some ways the situation with the dog and our cats reminds me of when I had my second child. I was heartbroken that I could not longer shower our first child with the attention he was used to. But, eventually, I came to terms with the fact that this was just what our family looked like now and everyone would have to adjust.

Good luck. Hang in there. The vet told us things would work out, and they are. I also talked to a neighbor who faced a similar situation and he said it took about a year for things to get back to normal. A year seems like a REALLY long time, but I tell myself that it's not too terribly much in relation to the entire life span of your pet.
 

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We are having a similar issue. We have two cats, a big baby of a boy cat, and an older, crotchety female cat. We also have a 16-week old border collie cross puppy, who we adopted from the shelter when he was 8 weeks old. At first he had no interest in the cats, but it didn't take long for something in his brain to click and he realized it was fun to chase our boy cat, Benny. Benny feeds the problem too because he instigates a lot of the play with Cricket (the puppy) by lying down on the floor right in front of Cricket and swatting at him with his paws, and rolling back and forth, inviting play. Cricket will jump on him, just like he would another dog, but he plays too rough for a cat. Like your puppy, Cricket will ignore the cats when he's calm. He'll sniff noses with them, and our cat Benny has even taken naps right next to Cricket on the couch. When Cricket is riled up (the puppy zoomies) or over tired, that's when the chasing happens.

He doesn't chase our female because she's shown him once or twice that she won't take that nonsense. :)

I think it's going to take lots and lots of persistence and consistent redirection. We have been working on "eyes on me" or "look at me" each and every time it looks like Cricket wants to chase the boy cat. We keep him on a tether when it's one of those times of the day, and the cats are milling around in the kitchen and Cricket is there too, hyped up and looking for trouble. Lots of clicker use, redirection, food rewards CONSTANTLY. It's really exhausting. I thought we had a break through the other day because after 8 solid weeks of redirection he showed some real signs of impulse control and stopped in his tracks from chasing Benny to turn and look at me and come over for a treat. I thought we'd reached a breakthrough, but today he chased Benny twice.

I hope things get better -- our cats are still coming to us for cuddles on the couch and they sleep on the bed with us at night, so they don't seem too stressed out or impacted by all of this, but we don't want to spend the next 14-15 years redirecting this dog!
 

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Subbing, hoping for tips, because I can't think of a way to deal with this sort of thing effectively without serious punishment, now it's become a strongly self rewarding behaviour. I absolutely hate the thought, but have even been considering a remote collar for this one thing...

I don't have cats, but we have chickens. When pups were young, of course we supervised very closely, interrupted, taught them 'leave it' and rewarded them for ignoring the chooks. After months of this, they were great, and we'd supervise them a little less closely. They were both great, so we started staying 'out of sight' when supervising. We never had to back it up, so thought they were 'trained'. Had left them together in the yard a number of times without event.

Then we were at a friend's place, who's chickens were generally locked up. Dogs were roaming around the backyard when we came out & heard a ruckus & friend was yelling at me to stop one of my dogs chasing his chooks! I suspect this first time might have been a surprise for my dog - and the chooks, provoking her instincts. Unfortunately she had a good 5-10 mins fun before we discovered her, and she scored more than a few tail feathers!(thankfully that was all)

Since then however, she's learned that chasing birds is Heaps Of Fun! We have gone back to full and close supervision with our chickens, because even if we're up the back but not close by, she can't help herself! While I will not risk leaving her alone with them any more, I would like to put her off enough that I don't have to actually be virtually on top of her in order to control her around them!
 
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