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Also, a piece of it may be more to do with the environment and "chaining." I have an acquaintance for example who is dealing with reactivity after a bad encounter. Know what happened after they changed their walking gear [for unrelated reasons]? The reactivity noticeably improved. The dog had chained the negative experience with wearing that particular harness, hence they were already feeling stressed/on alert when walking out the door. Something to consider.
 

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Maybe I'm grasping. But it's heavily discouraging that ALL it comes down to is temperament despite all the work I put in with ds/cc and none my dad has put in. So I really want there to at least be a few other explanations..
I doubt it is all temperament. It probably is a lot of things coming together. Dad is Mr. Fun where pretty much nothing bad happens and has his own schedule, expectations, and experiences built in. So, when you think of it like that, not so surprising; right?

Maybe to bump your training up, try a multi-pronged approach. I'm immensely fond of Kikopup's "Check It Out" game/video. There is also the game by a trainer who's name escapes me atm, who has a game similar to Kikopup's. However, the timing and handler involvement is different. It boils down to making little changes to the environment and rewarding the dog for showing initiative to investigate. You as the handler DO NOT encourage the dog to check the oddity out. You reward them for ALREADY showing their OWN initiative in exploring. For example, I laid the vacuum down on it's side and then "cheated" by placing treats on and around it--removing my presence from the equation as much as possible while still observing. When my girl explored it on her own, she discovered "good things." Small and random as it is, it helps build optimism, independence, and confidence.

Which brings me to another point. What is the timing of your cc/dc sessions generally? Are the treats for looking but being calm? Not looking? Looking but then looking at you? Are you focusing in place or moving? Timing can radically change things.
 

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I'm squeezing this in on a break, so I'll come back. But to explain the difference in timing and previous knowledge....

Showing a dog or puppy a reward that doesn't know "come" to bring them to you, where you mark as you reward, is a lure.

Rewarding a dog that was playing but then came to you, you mark and reward, is a capture.

For every step a dog comes closer and is rewarded for each advancement is shaping.

Calling "come" and the dog comes, and is then rewarded, is simply a reward.

Calling "come" multiple times, the dog ignores you AND has had this cue generalized, you reaching into your pocket and waving a cookie around while saying "come" for the nth time is a bribe.

So in my case it was her discovering good things.
 

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One could argue your dad did a badly run Constructional Aggression Treatment (CAT), authored by Kellie
Snider and Dr. Jesus Rosales-Ruiz. I'm skeptical of it, but I do think it has its values when facing unconventional dogs. But I do urge you to read the proper author(s) works.

Just because you can get away with something doesn't mean you ought. Personally, I'd try to focus his attention on me while moving forward. If we can, take a side route. But I've used spinning in a circle with a short leash and jogging before. So, for example, if we need to go towards something he is keying in on, we're gonna jog and play a jog-heel-jog game. If we are at a corner yard with another example, for experience, while we do it whenever the attention wanders, we're suddenly doing tight spins. But that is me.


He seems to key in visually. Is hearing part of it? But either way, how about practicing for success, getting him in "the groove" with something less stimulating?

He's not for everyone, but Zak George's video series "reality dog training" can make you feel better--that even pros can have challenges and make mistakes.

And the name I couldn't remember from earlier is Julie Andrews.
 

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For some dogs, just hearing the jingle of keys or dog tags is enough to make them hyper-alert. I was asking whether this applied to him, or if hearing but not seeing was enough to keep him under the threshold.

I would advise trying to combine them--hold out the treat while jogging/running past. If you can make it stinky like sardines or dried sprat, bonus points imo. I've also seen people do that, but dog starts huffing, they about turn, backtrack, then about turn and approach again.
 
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