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Hello.

I've been trying to figure this out for some time and nothing so far has worked. Hoping someone else has had a similar experience and success in "correcting" it.

I have a 10 year old yellow lab\short-hair pointer mix. And I have a 4 year old daughter. About 12-18 months ago, his behavior changed considerably in response to her voice. When she's speaking in a "normal" voice, there aren't any issues. However, when her voice changes, particularly when she laughs, my pup starts to whine\howl in response. Typically, it's when she laughs but it also happens when she sings at a higher volume. Oddly, when she cries or throws a little temper tantrum, he doesn't respond at all.

It typically progresses something like this:
My daughter starts to laugh a little.
My pup will get up if he's sitting down and walk around.
Her laughter gets louder..he'll start to moan a little (no growling, not a high-pitched whimper. It's more of a grumbling noise)
If I'm in the room, he'll come to me immediately.
She continues to laugh.
He breaks out into a full-blown whine\howl until she stops.
Typically, he'll carry on a little after she stops and often will need to be told to stop and physically removed from the room. (Although if he's in a different room, or even outside, he'll react the same, albeit it takes a little more to work him up.)

It certainly seems like an anxious response to the tone\pitch of her voice and I have no clue on how to address it without physically separating them.

Aside from that, there are no behavioral issues whatsoever. He is an energetic dog and in great shape for being 10 years old. There are no issues with the two of them interacting quietly, they'll lay on the couch together, etc.

Looking for some suggestions on how to correct\train this response out of him. Wondering if a thundershirt\body wrap would help but as this can happen any time she's awake, I'm not sure of it's effectiveness.

Your thoughts and commments would be appreciated.

Brian
 

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This is definitely an odd behavior. Especially considering he doesn't whine/howl when she's scream-crying or throwing a tantrum. (Those can make me want to howl sometimes, haha!)

The only thing I can think of off the top of my head is the positive interrupter:


Aside from that, removing him from the room is the other option, though I understand it's difficult to have to do that every time she laughs. A behaviorist could definitely help you, maybe you could call a few in your area and explain your situation?
 
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