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Sorry, this is a long post as I've provided a lot of context.

My dog was adopted from the SPCA 3 years ago. She was 'about 4' when we got her and was the submissive sister of a female pair that had ended up in a rescue in the Yukon after their previous person passed away. She was described as a 'border collie cross' which covers here coat colour (black), size (16 kg) and the one crooked-over ear but that's about it. Based on her thick double coat and shedding, she has almost certainly got some sort of spitz in her (Sibe?) but whatever else is a bit of a mystery. She has the look of a small version of a black German Shepherd but my guess is that she is a bit of a heinz.

She has made great strides in her people socialization since we adopted her, thanks in large part to the fact she goes into my husband's office with him every day. She is still a bit skittish when faced with strangers wielding big flappy things (a parson wearing a rain poncho, for example) but is very tolerant of people and their idiosyncrasies. I took her to obedience/agility training and she was the star of the class, admittedly perhaps because she was the only mature dog in the class. She is rather reserved around most other dogs (two exceptions are a male Karelian Bear Dog - I have rarely seen such yipping and play-bowing from her as when she comes accross him on a walk- and an elderly, nervous female misc rescue mutt - they both pee in separate spots then swap to sniff, while gently wagging, followed by the occasional respectful sniff) but she is very savvy about dog behaviour and body language. She has been attacked three times since we've had her. The first time was a dominance thing by a Malamute who broke his collar to pounce on her. The second time was after she'd been barked at, barked back, then suffered the other dog's frustration at being caught up in it's harness as it leaped out of its (parked!) pick-up. The last time was a GSD rescue, that she knows but had never previously had a bad interaction with, who came running onto the beach and launched at her - this was the only attack I would describe as a 'kill' attack on her. She lost some confidence after each of these events but the last attack was many months ago and we had worked our way back up to having an active, happy, little dog who is mostly well-behaved albeit with a very active prey drive when it comes to small, furry critters (squirrels, rats, rabbits,...).

In the last couple of days I have observed some rather unusual (for her) behaviour during her walks. The first thing is that she is doing the 'staring' thing at other dogs she meets, particularly if they are dogs she is uncertain of (new dogs, dogs behaving dominantly). Our previous (also rescue) dog did this because she had never been socialized with other dogs so was just clueless about doggy body language but this is the first time I have seen it from our current pooch. The second thing, that started at the same time, is that now the snow cover is disappearing she is digging for aforementioned small, furry critters. This is OK (she is on an extendable leash at this point of her walk) until it comes time to leave the meadow. She is flatly refusing to go anywhere other than once around the meadow again, to the point of her sitting down and 'going on strike'. She is surprisingly strong for a 35 lb dog and once she locks her paws in there is no budging her short of picking her up. I have tried encouragement, distraction, key words (dinner, home, truck, etc), command (worked only the first time) but would really like to nip this in the bud.

Does anybody have any idea about whether these two recent developments are coincidence or related? And does anybody have any suggestions about how to get her moving again?

Thanks.
 

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For the staring at other dogs, you could try popping some very high value treats into her mouth right when she spots the dog, feed as long as the dog is in view and stop when it's gone, so that she makes the connection that seeing strange dogs equals her getting yummy treats. You'll know she's made the connection when she spots a dog then looks back at you for the treat.

With off leash time it sounds like she's figured out that getting the leash on means the end of the fun time. She's going to boring old home, so why should she want to leave? There's a few things you can do.
1. Try going on a quick walk once you get her leashed. It only needs to be 10 to 15 minutes long. She'll learn that the leash does not mean that fun time is ended, it means she gets to sniff something new.
2. Have a really special, high value, treat in the car for the ride home. You can do something like a Kong stuffed with peanut butter and kibble, or yougurt and treats to name a couple. Freeze it to make it last longer. Only give it to her on the ride home so that she knows that's the only time she gets it.
3. Once you get her home start an extra fun game that she loves, that way she associates going home with the good times continuing not ending.

Personally I'd do #3 regardless of if you choose to do 1 or 2.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For the staring at other dogs, you could try popping some very high value treats into her mouth right when she spots the dog, feed as long as the dog is in view and stop when it's gone, so that she makes the connection that seeing strange dogs equals her getting yummy treats. You'll know she's made the connection when she spots a dog then looks back at you for the treat.

With off leash time it sounds like she's figured out that getting the leash on means the end of the fun time. She's going to boring old home, so why should she want to leave? There's a few things you can do.
1. Try going on a quick walk once you get her leashed. It only needs to be 10 to 15 minutes long. She'll learn that the leash does not mean that fun time is ended, it means she gets to sniff something new.
2. Have a really special, high value, treat in the car for the ride home. You can do something like a Kong stuffed with peanut butter and kibble, or yougurt and treats to name a couple. Freeze it to make it last longer. Only give it to her on the ride home so that she knows that's the only time she gets it.
3. Once you get her home start an extra fun game that she loves, that way she associates going home with the good times continuing not ending.

Personally I'd do #3 regardless of if you choose to do 1 or 2.
Thanks for the suggestions. I'll definitely give the treats a go. She was never food motivated (as a result of being bullied away from food by her sister - we initially struggled to get her up from 13 kg to a normal weight of 16 kg) and but has found a taste of homemade beef jerky treats in the last year.

I'd love to get her to a place where #3 was an option. The only fun 'game' she likes is hunting and I've tried every toy you can think of to mimic that, including cat toys! She is like a dog possessed at the moment in the meadow - it is in a natural park area so she has to be on leash, but we have to go through it to get to the only fenced off-leash area in my area, which is the only place I trust her to be off-leash. She is currently spurning playing fetch in the off-leash for nosing through tufts of grass even though she is on-leash. Maybe I should use her regular leash instead of the retractable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just to close the loop, now the snow has god she is no longer obsessing about digging in that one meadow. We kept her away from it for a couple of weeks and now she is back to nosing through the interesting tufts as we walk through but will at least move on when told to do so.
 

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Sorry, this is a long post as I've provided a lot of context.

My dog was adopted from the SPCA 3 years ago. She was 'about 4' when we got her and was the submissive sister of a female pair that had ended up in a rescue in the Yukon after their previous person passed away. She was described as a 'border collie cross' which covers here coat colour (black), size (16 kg) and the one crooked-over ear but that's about it. Based on her thick double coat and shedding, she has almost certainly got some sort of spitz in her (Sibe?) but whatever else is a bit of a mystery. She has the look of a small version of a black German Shepherd but my guess is that she is a bit of a heinz.

She has made great strides in her people socialization since we adopted her, thanks in large part to the fact she goes into my husband's office with him every day. She is still a bit skittish when faced with strangers wielding big flappy things (a parson wearing a rain poncho, for example) but is very tolerant of people and their idiosyncrasies. I took her to obedience/agility training and she was the star of the class, admittedly perhaps because she was the only mature dog in the class. She is rather reserved around most other dogs (two exceptions are a male Karelian Bear Dog - I have rarely seen such yipping and play-bowing from her as when she comes accross him on a walk- and an elderly, nervous female misc rescue mutt - they both pee in separate spots then swap to sniff, while gently wagging, followed by the occasional respectful sniff) but she is very savvy about dog behaviour and body language. She has been attacked three times since we've had her. The first time was a dominance thing by a Malamute who broke his collar to pounce on her. The second time was after she'd been barked at, barked back, then suffered the other dog's frustration at being caught up in it's harness as it leaped out of its (parked!) pick-up. The last time was a GSD rescue, that she knows but had never previously had a bad interaction with, who came running onto the beach and launched at her - this was the only attack I would describe as a 'kill' attack on her. She lost some confidence after each of these events but the last attack was many months ago and we had worked our way back up to having an active, happy, little dog who is mostly well-behaved albeit with a very active prey drive when it comes to small, furry critters (squirrels, rats, rabbits,...).

In the last couple of days I have observed some rather unusual (for her) behaviour during her walks. The first thing is that she is doing the 'staring' thing at other dogs she meets, particularly if they are dogs she is uncertain of (new dogs, dogs behaving dominantly). Our previous (also rescue) dog did this because she had never been socialized with other dogs so was just clueless about doggy body language but this is the first time I have seen it from our current pooch. The second thing, that started at the same time, is that now the snow cover is disappearing she is digging for aforementioned small, furry critters. This is OK (she is on an extendable leash at this point of her walk) until it comes time to leave the meadow. She is flatly refusing to go anywhere other than once around the meadow again, to the point of her sitting down and 'going on strike'. She is surprisingly strong for a 35 lb dog and once she locks her paws in there is no budging her short of picking her up. I have tried encouragement, distraction, key words (dinner, home, truck, etc), command (worked only the first time) but would really like to nip this in the bud.

Does anybody have any idea about whether these two recent developments are coincidence or related? And does anybody have any suggestions about how to get her moving again?

Thanks.
Your dog is misbehaving, there may be many reasons, some of them are given
  1. lack of training.
  2. lack of exercise.
  3. lack of nutrition.
  4. Boredom. (not having a partner dog or lonely for a long time in a day)
  5. canine anxiety.
  6. lack of sleep(rare)
These are the basic reasons why your dog misbehaves with you or your family members, friends & neighbors. A few years ago i also had this problem, my dog (named jimmy) used to bark at my neighbors and some of my friends. my dog was physically inactive. then I went to the nearest vet but the problem was not resolved, I also hired a pet trainer who charged me $70/day but nothing works. there was a time that I regret about having a dog at all. And then an old friend of mine discovered a course for dogs which I think it may work, but it was better than my expectation! my dog not only became well behaved he begin to follow my all commands like (“sit”,” run”,” come here jimmy”, etc). after months we together went for hiking and jimmy cooperated with me very well, it was an amazing trip. he became so well behaved, interactive & obedient that I never expected. I’m glad that I got jimmy now we are best friends.
If you can relate from this story and your dog isn’t well behaved then you should try this course (here is the link- http://bit.ly/2YMzFt9 ) I can assure you won’t regret
just copy and paste this link on your browser if it’s not working.
Have a nice evening with your fellow met.:)
 
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