Dog Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi, I have a 5 year old mixed breed dog. she has a nervous disposition very fearful of bangs, fireworks scraping chairs etc. She also chases her tail intensively when she is excited usually when there is laughter or certain noises. She was born to two very fearful rescue dogs so she has it in her nature. She was well socialised as a puppy I took her to the park training classes etc and she goes regularly to a social kennel where she mixes with other dogs.

My issue that is giving me a lot of grief at the moment is when I take her to the local park which often has a few dogs, if another (particularly young or small dogs) runs up to her she very often turns on them and starts a fight - she very quickly stops when I call her off but it is very stressful not knowing how she will react to a dog approaching her sometimes she will be fine and she will tolerate being sniffed and occasionally she will initiate the sniffing but not often. When a dog approaches her I say good girl and use calming words which does seem to help but it is unpredictable. I am now getting to the point of avoiding taking her to the park and seeking places without other dogs but I am worried that this will make her worse when she does encounter a dog. being in town it is an impossible task to run her as she needs without encountering other dogs. She is so good off the lead in terms of coming back,waiting etc I would hate the thought of having to keep her on a lead. She was a playful friendly pup but she now is not interested in other dogs.

As she loves running and is very fit I do throw a ball for her a lot in the park and she can become quite obsessive with it - I wonder if this is not helping as it makes her not interested in the dogs. She is fine on the lead not aggressive and she does not seek dogs out to be aggressive toward its only when they approach her in an over friendly way.

any suggestions most appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
Either stop the dog parks, or keep her on lead. It's not fair to other dogs to risk them being attacked. Find a training group that is able to help and knows what could happen. Again keep her, and other dogs on lead until she is 100% reliable. Some dogs just don't tolerate some behaviors of other dogs.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Either stop the dog parks, or keep her on lead. It's not fair to other dogs to risk them being attacked. Find a training group that is able to help and knows what could happen. Again keep her, and other dogs on lead until she is 100% reliable. Some dogs just don't tolerate some behaviors of other dogs.
Posted via Mobile Device
I agree completely. It's one thing to take your dog to the dog park and not know before hand that he/she has issues with other dogs, but to do so knowing she has a issues is not only irresponsible, it's setting your own dog up for failure, not to mention yourself for legal liabilities. It might be sad that she loses out on off leash time, but other people's dogs have a right to be safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I agree completely. It's one thing to take your dog to the dog park and not know before hand that he/she has issues with other dogs, but to do so knowing she has a issues is not only irresponsible, it's setting your own dog up for failure, not to mention yourself for legal liabilities. It might be sad that she loses out on off leash time, but other people's dogs have a right to be safe.
I agree also. don't take your dog to the park if you want to avoid scuffles with other dogs. as you mentioned, you are culpable for your dog's actions and you could not only face a fine but your dog could be at risk of being put to sleep if it's deemed he/she poses a threat. I posted a thread similar to this in the general discussion sub-forum. I had a problem not too long ago at the dog park with a woman's aggressive dog, and from what i've heard she continues to bring her dog and allows it to attack other dogs. I know if I see this woman again i'll either call the police or animal control
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
Make sure you're the one who controls interaction. Just throwing a nervous dog into situations thet feel anxious about sets them up for failure. Keep her on a leash, work with other people that have friendly, calm dogs (on leash), have your dog in a sit and the other person with their dog walk up to you, put their dog in a sit (no sniffing, playing on leash etc), shake the person's hand, exchange a few words and have them walk off again. Make every interaction calmly, if your dog gets up, calmly put her back into a sit, if the other dog approaches yours, YOU calmly block it with your hands. Your dog needs to be able to rely on you for guidance when she gets nervous, and not be left alone in those situations.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,335 Posts
I think Regula's suggestion will be too much, too soon for your dog. You need to work from distances first, below stress levels, and reward for good actions from your dog (in the way of treats, play, moving away, etc, whatever motivates your dog the most). I agree that you should keep in on leash areas only and out of frequented locations until you can work on this. It may increase the undesirable behavior to have random dogs run up to her while she's leashed since she has no escape (and may be getting negative signals from you, ie tightening of leash). Check out the sticky posts in the behavior and training section--they should clarify some helpful methods.
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
What you (crock) are suggesting and what I was suggesting are two entirely different things. You are suggesting classic "desensitizing", i.e. the dog is gradually accustomed to having other dogs closer and closer around her. This in principle is not wrong.

However, the OP was saying that

1) the dog was socialized a lot as a puppy,
2) the dog has "nervous" in her genetic setup,
3) the dog right now goes to off-leash dog parks, and
4) the dog gets reactive towards other dogs.

So even if you desensitize the heck out of her (as the OP has apparently done during puppy stages), she will probably always have a threshhold where she gets nervous and goes forward.
True, you can try to lower the threshhold to zero, but with the given genetics this will be difficult. What I am suggesting is that it has to be the HUMAN who controls situations that make the dog nervous. So instead of going forward she should turn to the human to help out in this situation, and the human should not fail the dog. Too many times in dog parks you see out of control dogs whose owners tell you "oh, they'll figure it out amongst themselves", which most of the time works reasonably, but I don't believe in that for dogs who already go forward.
I want my dog to feel like I got his back in situations he feels unsure about, so he will come back to me to take care of things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,472 Posts
I agree with the other posters. It isn't fair to other people at the park to have their dogs be snapped at
Posted via Mobile Device
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top