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Hello Everyone,

I have a puggle named Charlie, he's roughly 6 but I don't know for sure since he was a rescue. I've had Charlie for almost 2 years. He had 2 seizures in the first year, he had 1 in April 2016 and unfortunately last night he had another one. They don't happen frequently enough for him to be put on medication (and I'm not too sure i'd wanna do that anyways) so I was wondering if any out there has some tips on things I can do to try and prevent them as much as I can. Also, every time he had a seizure he was just laying down on the couch or in his bed.
Thank you for your time and appreciate any feedback.

Joseph
 

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Do you have a cause for the seizures? With my old girl it was liver disease/hepatic encephalopathy. If it is due to liver disease (blood tests/ultrasound to diagnose) then lactulose will help as it reduces ammonia build up.
If they are ideopathic or perhaps caused by epilepsy, google canine epilepsy groups for some useful seizure advice.
Sometimes vets will give you a supply of diazepam to give rectally when a seizure occurs. Also I have seen ice packs recommended for the back of the neck if a seizure happens. Plus I have seen gelatine recommended as a dietary supplement but lots more info on this site. I understand Dr Dodds has a reputation for being a credible source of info.
Dr. Jean Dodds' Pet Health Resource Blog | Review of Seizures/Epilepsy in Animals
 

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You should read up on the newer 'neuro' diets that have shown some promise in treating epileptic symptoms in dogs. They seem pretty effective in many cases (not all of course) and have few, if any downsides (other than cost). But I also agree with you not to treat a pet that is having such rare seizure activity, unless the seizures are particularly violent or long lasting. The goal of medical treatment is to keep seizures down to a 'manageable' frequency, which is not an exact number, but more of an individual-specific situation. Having a mild seizure less often than every 2 months will usually not interest any veterinary neurology specialist to treat.
 

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CBD oil may help, here is a video of a child being administered cannabis spray which stops a seizure almost immediately and an interview with the developer.


If you are on facebook, I highly recommend joining the Canine Health Concern page, you will find information on CBD oil and seizures, it will also provide some insight into why this happened. It is likely iatrogenic in nature, and you can do things that will help that doesn't involve medication, especially detoxes.
 

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Obviously the only suggestion that anyone on the internet should suggest would be to consult with a licensed veterinarian. The internet is not where people should be getting ideas on what to and what not to administer their dogs.
 

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The thing is the vets cause the problems in the first place and unless you do your own research and decided what you want and don't want for your animals you are not in a position to give informed consent. The internet is a great place to start your research, ever heard of PubMed that's an online resource?

Relying solely on the word of a vet is a risky idea without knowing what other options are available to you. It's all about choice and informed consent because, at the end of the day, the vet doesn't have to deal with the outcomes, it's down to the owner to live with an unhealthy animal, so they should be very sure there isn't a better, safer way.
 

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Also taking information that someone has found on the internet and dispensing medicine is not only extremely dangerous, but it's also against the forum rules.

The internet is a tricky place where not everything that is out there is true, and not every person (or animal in this case) will have the same reactions as other.

If you are not comfortable with classic veterinarian practices maybe looking into a holistic vet would be the best option. None the less OP (or anyone) should be treating their dog for a medical ailment not under some sort of veterinarian watch.

As animalcracker wrote in the other Medical Marijuana thread, as of now Medical marijuana is not a prescribed drug for dogs.

"It is currently illegal and unsafe for veterinary use, including hemp oil. The states that have passed laws to legalize pot have only done so for human use. Veterinarians are regulated by more than just their state. The USDA, FDA, and DEA are all notational organizations that your local vet may report to and none of those organizations endorse the use of marijuana. There's actually been quite a few different articles about this topic in the various vet publications recently, since the industry has been dealing with the negative side effects of society's open view on pot, I'll have to see if I can find a few of the articles to share."
 
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